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Old 04-03-2013, 03:40 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by berebrando

Awesome! I love the way all-Brett fermentations pair up with hoppy American style beers! What part of Orange County are you brewing in? I'm in old town Orange near the plaza.
Yeah, I've really wanted to do the zombie dust clone, but couldn't help myself from pairing all that citra with just a little Amarillo and cascade. Ended up with 11 gal of a 1.072 IPA with over a pound of hops int the boil (most in the last 15 minutes) and will be dry hopping with about 10 oz of dry hops. My ratio of Citra:Amarillo:cascade was 4:2:1. It already smells amazing in my fermenter and I can't wait to see what the Brett L does with the fruitiness of those hops.

I'm in Huntington Beach. I will definitely be visiting you new location for the good beer brewery when it opens! If you have sours on rotation my wife may never leave! Keeps me posted on when you're opening.

Also, as a structural engineer by trade I deal a lot with the city for clients doing tenant improvements on spaces and such - if you run into trouble with anything structural in your new space (anchorage of equipment, bracing, etc...) let me know and I might be able to help a fellow brewer out....

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Old 04-03-2013, 07:43 PM   #12
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A quick update: the temperature in my fermentation chamber (chest freezer) was up to 78 this morning on the free rise. I added a heat pad and set it to heat at 75 degrees to keep these suckers warm and get some good attenuation.

Quote:
I'm in Huntington Beach. I will definitely be visiting you new location for the good beer brewery when it opens! If you have sours on rotation my wife may never leave! Keeps me posted on when you're opening.
Probably another topic for another time and place... Sour will be in the works but will obviously take a while to reach the consumer. Wild ales, like the golden ale this thread is based on, will most certainly be part of the lineup.

Reason: Added quote...

 
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Old 04-03-2013, 11:55 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by berebrando View Post
A quick update: the temperature in my fermentation chamber (chest freezer) was up to 78 this morning on the free rise. I added a heat pad and set it to heat at 75 degrees to keep these suckers warm and get some good attenuation.



Probably another topic for another time and place... Sour will be in the works but will obviously take a while to reach the consumer. Wild ales, like the golden ale this thread is based on, will most certainly be part of the lineup.
Sounds good. On the fermentation temp for brett L - what do you recommend? I have both batches in my chest freezer that is set at 65 (Sacc Beer Temp), with a 12" wide heat tape strip wrapped around the Brett carboy that is set to 72 degrees for that one. Is that enough? They are both fermenting madly now (pitched Sunday night - 3 days in), but the Brett did lag for about 36 hours... I pitched a 2L starter that was stepped up from a 1.2L starter with both being allowed to ferment our on the stirplate for 7-10 days each. Am I doing everything right for Brett?

 
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Old 04-04-2013, 01:35 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OCBrewin

Sounds good. On the fermentation temp for brett L - what do you recommend? I have both batches in my chest freezer that is set at 65 (Sacc Beer Temp), with a 12" wide heat tape strip wrapped around the Brett carboy that is set to 72 degrees for that one. Is that enough? They are both fermenting madly now (pitched Sunday night - 3 days in), but the Brett did lag for about 36 hours... I pitched a 2L starter that was stepped up from a 1.2L starter with both being allowed to ferment our on the stirplate for 7-10 days each. Am I doing everything right for Brett?
It's probably different under every set of conditions, but I can tell you my experience with fermentation temperatures and Brett: over the past several months, I have used Brett Trois in everything from blonde ales to IPAs at varying temperatures. I've fermented at 60, 65, 70 and 72 (with free rise to max of 78) and had the best results with 72, so far. Very fruity and good attenuation. Nothing off that I can discern.

What these beers evolve into over time is an interesting exercise, I think. I'd guess that at different temperatures you have a different chemical profile and how Brett reacts with and reconfigures that profile over time remains to be seen. But that's way beyond me.
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Old 04-04-2013, 08:19 PM   #15
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Awesome! Good info. I feel good about my temps now, both Brett and Sacc, and can't wait to compare. I know that Brett develops with time, but what so you think a schedule looks like for a Brett IPA to be ready? My normal Sacc IPAs are usually about 4 weeks grain to glass, depending on the dryhopping and keg carbing time. Is Brett similar for primary strains?

 
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Old 04-04-2013, 10:55 PM   #16
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My Brett IPA (Brett b. 'Trois') went grain to glass in 4 weeks, too. I'm not sure what kind of schedule lambicus works on... yet.

Here are a couple photos I took this morning. The krausen on the Brett b. and Brett b. 'Trois' has subsided. Meanwhile, the Brett l. and Brett c. are still visibly fermenting away. I haven't checked gravity, yet, so I can't say how much attenuation has occurred.
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Old 04-05-2013, 02:38 PM   #17
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Subscribed. Can't wait to see your results.
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Old 04-15-2013, 04:11 AM   #18
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Today, after two weeks in the fermenter, I took samples to check the gravity and get some initial thoughts on how these beasts taste.

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Here are my tasting notes and current SG for each yeast:

B. bruxellensis - 1.014, lots of malt flavor, some moderate/light bread crust flavors. Good flocculation but not great attenuation so far.

B. bruxellensis 'Trois' - 1.008, less malt forward and more pronounced bitterness. Light alcohol derived heat and moderate fruitiness. Best flocculation and attenuation. This beer is nearly crystal clear.

B. claussenii - 1.010, overripe pineapple aromas and some lemon flavors. Little mat presence and moderate bitterness.

B. lambicus - 1.010, overripe (general) fruit nose, some interesting acidity developing here. Light hay flavors and generally malt-forward taste.

I think the most interesting point here is the light acidity that the B. lambicus developed. It's interesting to compare these beers side by side and I look forward to the final product.

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Old 04-15-2013, 04:05 PM   #19
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Great info. I've flirted with some Brett in the WLP670 American Farmhouse a few times, but I watched that Chad Yakobson lecture a few weeks ago and really got pumped up about using 100% Brett. I'm following your progress and wishing you the best.

 
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Old 04-16-2013, 02:27 PM   #20
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Great info. I've flirted with some Brett in the WLP670 American Farmhouse a few times, but I watched that Chad Yakobson lecture a few weeks ago and really got pumped up about using 100% Brett. I'm following your progress and wishing you the best.
Really cool. I can't say I've used 670, but it has tempted me a couple times.

I think that what Chad says about the flavor profile he's looking for is the most important and misunderstood part of fermenting with pure Brett cultures. When developing a recipe, you should start by identifying what you want the finished beer to taste like. To paraphrase CY, the purpose of a 100% Brett fermentation is often not to obtain a super "bretty" beer. The objective is merely to obtain a flavor profile that you can't obtain with any other yeast. Some Brett strains are going to be super clean, some super fruity, and others downright funky - you can say the same about Saccharomyces strains. I think that's an interesting point that he makes in his lecture.

 
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