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Old 03-15-2013, 02:41 AM   #1
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Default Malted vs Unmalted wheat

For brewing a Lambic (or any beer for that matter) what is the difference between using Malted wheat (and mashing) or Unmalted wheat (and mashing it with grains that can convert).

I'm thinking of mashing Malted Wheat and 2 Row (at a 1:2 ratio) unless you think that wont that good?


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Old 03-15-2013, 01:54 PM   #2
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Traditionally unmalted wheat was used in a turbid mash that converted some of the starches and left others gelatinized to create a complex wort to sustain the long mixed-fermentation. Malted wheat would not work, its starches are too easily converted and would yield easily fermentable sugars.

If you are planning to do a single infusion mash, there really won't be much of a difference between malted and unmalted wheat. Their flavors aren't exactly the same, but with the complex character of the fermentation it is probably not noticeable.


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Old 03-16-2013, 02:23 PM   #3
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If using unmalted wheat, doing a protein rest would be a good idea.
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Old 03-18-2013, 11:55 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldsock View Post
Traditionally unmalted wheat was used in a turbid mash that converted some of the starches and left others gelatinized to create a complex wort to sustain the long mixed-fermentation. Malted wheat would not work, its starches are too easily converted and would yield easily fermentable sugars.

If you are planning to do a single infusion mash, there really won't be much of a difference between malted and unmalted wheat. Their flavors aren't exactly the same, but with the complex character of the fermentation it is probably not noticeable.
In Wild Brews, Jeff Sparrow simplifies a turbid mash for the Lambic homebrewer scale by simply taking 10% of the grist (just 2-row and rice hulls) and along with all of the unmalted wheat and doing a rest at 145°F for 30 minutes then bringing it to a boil for 30 minutes (somewhere in pages 143-148, I do believe). That way the wheat can gelatinize. After that, you just pour that boiled mixture into the mash and mash around 158°F like normal.
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Old 03-19-2013, 12:34 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brewbobaggins View Post
In Wild Brews, Jeff Sparrow simplifies a turbid mash for the Lambic homebrewer scale by simply taking 10% of the grist (just 2-row and rice hulls) and along with all of the unmalted wheat and doing a rest at 145°F for 30 minutes then bringing it to a boil for 30 minutes (somewhere in pages 143-148, I do believe). That way the wheat can gelatinize. After that, you just pour that boiled mixture into the mash and mash around 158°F like normal.
I've done the "WYeast mash" from Wild Brews a couple of times, with pretty mediocre results. It's really just a cereal mash, I don't see any advantage to it over a standard infusion mash with something like flaked wheat that is already gelated. I've had much better results with the full turbid. It really isn't that hard or long, espeically when you consider the time going into aging a sour beer.
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Old 03-19-2013, 04:02 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldsock

I've done the "WYeast mash" from Wild Brews a couple of times, with pretty mediocre results. It's really just a cereal mash, I don't see any advantage to it over a standard infusion mash with something like flaked wheat that is already gelated. I've had much better results with the full turbid. It really isn't that hard or long, espeically when you consider the time going into aging a sour beer.
Ah. That's good to know.
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Old 03-22-2013, 05:05 PM   #7
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Flaked white wheat works well as well. Unmalted, you can buy it at homebrew shops or even cheaper at Whole Foods
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Old 06-10-2013, 10:53 PM   #8
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Old 06-10-2013, 11:03 PM   #9
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Wheat can gelatinize at mash temps. It can take longer than an hour though. Milled into flower it can convert fairly well.


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