Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Extended mash times
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-13-2013, 02:30 AM   #1
JBeuchs
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: , Pennsylvania
Posts: 26
Likes Given: 1

Default Extended mash times

Has anyone experimented with mash times in excess of 60 minutes? I've read some material indicating a slightly increased efficiency numbers with 90 minute mashes. Any thought?


JBeuchs is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2013, 02:36 AM   #2
billl
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 2,112
Liked 323 Times on 270 Posts
Likes Given: 7

Default

How about - it depends.

If you have 100% conversion at 60 minutes, you can't get any increase in efficiency.


If you are less than 100% conversion, then you'll continue to convert as long as you hold the temp. The crush at my local homebrew shop hits the low 90's in 60 minutes and will be 99% at 90.


billl is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2013, 02:39 AM   #3
jeffjm
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: St. Louis, Missouri
Posts: 435
Liked 80 Times on 55 Posts
Likes Given: 15

Default

I usually do a 75 or 90 minute mash on beers that I either want to finish really dry or where I am using a less attenuative yeast. I am not sure how much it affects efficiency, but it does seem to help lower my final gravity.
__________________
I set out running but I take my time.
jeffjm is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2013, 02:56 AM   #4
jarnock
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 71
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 22

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by billl View Post
How about - it depends.

If you have 100% conversion at 60 minutes, you can't get any increase in efficiency.


If you are less than 100% conversion, then you'll continue to convert as long as you hold the temp. The crush at my local homebrew shop hits the low 90's in 60 minutes and will be 99% at 90.
99% efficiency? That is amazing if it is true.
__________________
http://jevelaigbrewery.blogspot.com/

"Because without beer...things do not seem to go as well" Brother Epp
jarnock is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2013, 03:45 AM   #5
JBeuchs
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: , Pennsylvania
Posts: 26
Likes Given: 1

Default

I am new to all grain (I've got 2 batches under my belt). My efficiency is in the 65-70% range. I'd like it to be more like 75-80%. I think the screen I use in my mash tun may be at least part of the problem. I've seen different recipes call for 60 min mashes and others 90 minutes. I guess I wasn't sure what the pros/cons were.
JBeuchs is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2013, 04:34 AM   #6
bhondorp
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Posts: 30
Liked 6 Times on 3 Posts

Default

Effiency is potential SG vs what's in your fermenter. Conversion can be 100% (I don't know that it is) and you still have sparge and equipment losses to lower efficiency.

I biab and use a longer mash time (90 m) to ensure the amylase(s) have time to chew the carbs in the dilute environment of full volume biab.
bhondorp is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2013, 01:12 PM   #7
billl
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 2,112
Liked 323 Times on 270 Posts
Likes Given: 7

Default

"99% efficiency? That is amazing if it is true."

Just to clarify, that is 99% conversion efficiency. Anyone with a good crush is getting 99% efficiency in under 60 minutes. Anyone with a mediocre crush generally isn't. That is why people report such large brewhouse efficiency jumps when they start milling finer. If you only start out with 90% conversion, that would change an 80% brewhouse down to a 70%.

In terms of fermentability, that is highly temp dependant. If you are mashing in a temp where Beta is working well (under 152), that will continue to break down the larger sugars as well as the starch. If you are at a much higher temp, Beta slows way down and alpha dominates. A long rest at alpha temps won't necessarily produce a much more fermentable wort.
billl is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2013, 01:31 PM   #8
bobbrews
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Sierra, Nevada
Posts: 4,020
Liked 426 Times on 343 Posts
Likes Given: 72

Default

The diastatic power of your intended base malt, other fermentables in the grist, and targeted mash temp(s) also comes into play here. I suggest reading up on this more if you want to improve efficiency (in select cases) with an extended mash time.

http://byo.com/all-grain-brewing/ite...f-step-mashing
bobbrews is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2013, 04:14 PM   #9
jhoyda
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Tiffin, OH
Posts: 258
Liked 36 Times on 27 Posts
Likes Given: 13

Default

I mash longer than 60 minutes because it makes my brew day easier. After dinner I heat my strike water and mash in, usually by 7:00. Then I get the kids ready for bed and read books with them. By the time I get back to the garage it's usually 8-8:15. But it means I'll be boiling by 9 and done by 10:30 instead of midnight
jhoyda is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-13-2013, 05:48 PM   #10
daksin
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
daksin's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 4,435
Liked 320 Times on 276 Posts
Likes Given: 346

Default

This isn't an issue of efficiency- 90% of homebrewers are getting full conversion, and most of those in teh first 20m of the mash. Mashing for longer will give you a more fermentable wort as the amylases continue to work on the already converted sugars in the mash, breaking them down into smaller and more easily fermentable sugars.


__________________
I can't be arsed to keep up this list of what's in the fermenters, but hey, check out the cool brewery I own!

twitter.com/2kidsbrewing .. facebook.com/2kidsbrewing .. 2kidsbrewing.com
daksin is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Effects of Extended Mash Time Brutus Brewer All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 4 10-25-2012 05:27 PM
Extended Mash Time Question hbhudy All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 3 07-13-2011 07:53 PM
Choc. Stout extended mash NuclearRich All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 2 09-07-2010 02:17 PM
Extended Primary vs. Extended bottle conditioning Bradinator General Beer Discussion 11 02-17-2010 11:55 PM
Ever wondered about the affects of an extended mash time? Kaiser All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 14 12-04-2007 02:35 AM


Forum Jump

Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS