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Old 03-13-2013, 12:16 AM   #1
Thunder_Chicken
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I'm brewing using my stovetop and pots and pans in my kitchen, and I don't have plans to upgrade too much. The SWMBO has signed off on my having a 5-gallon primary (actually a 6 gallon ale pail) in the kitchen for temperature control, but my real problem is actually filling it.

With both of the big kettles that I have I can do partial mashes, with grains in one pot and reconstituted DME or LME in the other. Best I can do on my stovetop is about 3 gallons of wort per day. I can cool my mash down quickly in an ice bath in the sink, and I do the same with the reconstituted DME (which I just quickly boil to sanitize). But even after this it is all too warm to pitch yeast into until the next day. I let everything cool to room temp while covered, then dump it all in the fermenter and pitch.

What I was thinking of doing was doing this process on sequential days, in order to fill up my fermenter. Do my partial mash 3 gallon boil, cool it overnight, put it in the primary and pitch yeast, and then boil an additional 3 gallons, cool that to room temperature, and then adding that to the already-pitched primary 24 hours later.

Can anyone poke any holes in this idea? Obviously I need to make sure everything is at or very near room temperature before it goes into the fermenter to avoid shocking the yeast. Will this screw up the yeast development? My guess is if I do this within a day or so the yeast will not really care, and mixing oxygen in probably still won't be a worry.



 
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Old 03-13-2013, 12:20 AM   #2
captwalt
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Have you considered making a high gravity wort and just topping off with cold water


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Old 03-13-2013, 12:21 AM   #3
captwalt
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Your idea would probably work fine but I think you're making it harder Than it has to be
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Old 03-13-2013, 12:32 AM   #4
Thunder_Chicken
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Quote:
Originally Posted by captwalt View Post
Have you considered making a high gravity wort and just topping off with cold water
My concern was with how high I can drive the gravity before I start making syrup or burning. But yes, that would be a really attractive option if I could do a small boil and top off with chilled water.

I have a 1.5 gallon pot and a 2.5 gallon pot, but those volumes are filled to the rim, which I am hesitant to do. I usually do my BIAB mash in the 1.5 gallon (producing about 1 gallon) and reconstitute the DME in the larger pot (probably could get 2+ gallons but I usually limit it to 1.5 gallons to produce a total of 2.5 gallons of wort).

The last couple of batches I have had about 1 lb of grains in the bag and 3 lbs of DME in the other pot. 2 lbs of grains is probably not a huge stretch, though I would probably have to sparge to make up some of the wort volume. 6 lbs of DME in 2 gallons of water might go - again I just sweat about burning sugar.

 
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Old 03-13-2013, 12:40 AM   #5
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It should work fine. It takes a lot of pro breweries multiple batches to fill their fermentors. I would, however, suggest that you get your wort to pitching temperature immediately instead of letting it sit over night.
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Old 03-13-2013, 12:48 AM   #6
IffyG
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Why can't you get a 20 quart aluminum stock pot from a restaurant supply shop and do a standard partial boil like almost everyone else?

 
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Old 03-13-2013, 12:55 AM   #7
Thunder_Chicken
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IffyG View Post
Why can't you get a 20 quart aluminum stock pot from a restaurant supply shop and do a standard partial boil like almost everyone else?

Because my stove can barely get 8 quarts to a boil. Read the original post.

 
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Old 03-13-2013, 01:10 AM   #8
Weezy
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Have you considered just doing small batches? 2.5-3 gal? I'll brew 2 gallon partial mashes and top off to 3.

What's your true need for 5-6 gal? Brewing a kit? drinking and serving that much?

(I love me my 3 gallon better bottle with the rotating spigot.)

an option could be to do hops boil in pot with the specialty grains, then use other pot to just quick boil the extract in only as much water you can fit, then top off the ale pale with jugs of store bought RO water.

 
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Old 03-13-2013, 01:15 AM   #9
Thunder_Chicken
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mongrel View Post
It should work fine. It takes a lot of pro breweries multiple batches to fill their fermentors. I would, however, suggest that you get your wort to pitching temperature immediately instead of letting it sit over night.
I chill the mash wort down below 90F and then chill it it in the refrigerator overnight with the lid sealed in plastic wrap. The bigger kettle with the DME wort I seal with wrap but leave in on the stove overnight (no room in the fridge). In the morning the mash wort is ~45F and the DME wort is in the 70s, so when I toss them in the fermenter the mix is generally in the low 60s and ready to take yeast.

I put a lid on both kettles immediately at the end of the boils to keep air exposure to a minimum while they are hot/warm. They don't get opened until they are at pitch temp.

 
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Old 03-13-2013, 01:20 AM   #10
Thunder_Chicken
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weezy View Post
Have you considered just doing small batches? 2.5-3 gal? I'll brew 2 gallon partial mashes and top off to 3.

What's your true need for 5-6 gal? Brewing a kit? drinking and serving that much?

(I love me my 3 gallon better bottle with the rotating spigot.)

an option could be to do hops boil in pot with the specialty grains, then use other pot to just quick boil the extract in only as much water you can fit, then top off the ale pale with jugs of store bought RO water.
Well, I don't really need more beer, but I have half of a 5 gallon primary doing nothing but occupying space and holding CO2 now. If I can make more beer without occupying more real estate and needing more kitchen assets, then I get more beer to drink. Practically I might just be able to let it sit longer in primary to clean up and age and still get more (and better) beer.



 
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