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Old 03-12-2013, 08:18 PM   #1
burshaw
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Im looking to make a stronger cider i hear Lalvin's EC-1118*will live up to 18% is that the strongest i could get or...


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Old 03-12-2013, 09:04 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burshaw
Im looking to make a stronger cider i hear Lalvin's EC-1118*will live up to 18% is that the strongest i could get or...
I think the EC is the way to go...
Just my newbie opinion...


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Old 03-12-2013, 09:05 PM   #3
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I don't think this information has alcohol tolerances, but some good information so I thought I would post it...

--------------------------------
~~~EC -11118 - Lalvin champagne Extremely low production of foam, volatile acid and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) — make this strain an excellent choice. This strain ferments well over a very wide temperature range, from 50° to 86°F and demonstrates high osmotic and alcohol tolerance. Good flocculation with compact lees and a relatively neutral flavor and aroma contribution are also properties of the EC-1118.

The EC-1118 strain is recommended for all types of wines, including sparkling, and late harvest wines and cider. It may also be used to restart stuck fermentations.

~~~D47 Lalvin
The ICV D-47 is a low-foaming quick fermenter that settles well, forming a compact lees at the end of fermentation. This strain tolerates fermentation temperatures ranging from 59° to 68°F and enhances mouthfeel due to complex carbohydrates. Malolactic fermentation proceeds well in wine made with ICV D-47.

Recommended for making wines from white varieties such as Chardonnay and rosé wines. An excellent choice for producing mead, however be sure to supplement with yeast nutrients, especially usable nitrogen.

An excellent choice for dry whites, blush wines and residual sugar wines.

~~~71B-1122 Lalvin
The 71B strain is a rapid starter with a constant and complete fermentation between 59° and 86°F that has the ability to metabolize high amounts (20% to 40%) of malic acid. In addition to producing rounder, smoother, more aromatic wines that tend to mature quickly, it does not extract a great deal of phenols from the must so the maturation time is further decreased.

The 71B is used primarily by professional winemakers for young wines such as vin nouveau and has been found to be very suitable for blush and residual sugar whites. For grapes in regions naturally high in acid, the partial metabolism of malic acid helps soften the wine. The 71B also has the ability to produce significant esters and higher alcohols, making it an excellent choice for fermenting concentrates.

An excellent choice for blush & residual sugar whites, nouveau & young red wines. Also a good choice for late harvest wines.

~~~K1V-1116 Lalvin
The K1V-1116 strain is a rapid starter with a constant and complete fermentation between 50° and 95°F, capable of surviving a number of difficult conditions, such as low nutrient musts and high levels of sulfur dioxide (SO2) or sugar. Wines fermented with the K1V-1116 have very low volatile acidity, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and foam production.

The K1V-1116 strain tends to express the freshness of white grape varieties such as Sauvignon Blanc, Chenin Blanc and Seyval. The natural fresh fruit aromas are retained longer than with other standard yeast strains. Fruit wines and wines made from concentrates poor in nutrient balance benefit from the capacity of K1V-1116 to adapt to difficult fermentation conditions. Restarts stuck fermentations.

Highly recommended for dry whites, aged reds, and late harvest wines.

~~~Wyeast 4766 - Cider
Crisp and dry fermenting yeast with big, fruity finish. Creates a nice balance for all types of apples, pears, and other fruit. Allows fruit character to dominate the profile.

Origin:
Flocculation: Low
Attenuation: NA
Temperature Range: 60-75°F
Alcohol Tolerance: 12% ABV

~~~WLP775. English cider Yeast
By White Labs
Classic cider yeast. Ferments dry, but retains flavor from apples. Sulfur is produced during fermentation, but will disappear in first two weeks of aging. Can also be used for wine and high gravity beers.
Attenuation: >80%
Flocculation: Medium
Optimum Fermentation Temperature: 68-75°F
Alcohol Tolerance: Medium-High


~~~D21 Lalvin
Noted for its good fermentation performance even under high temperature and low nutrient conditions. Produces very few sulfide compounds during fermentation.
Selected for fermenting red wines with stable color, in*tense fore-mouth volume, mid-palate tannin structure and fresh aftertaste.
Lalvin ICV D21® can also be used with very ripe white grapes that are barrel fermented to develop fresh fruit aromas, volume and acidity. In highly clarified juices, maintain fermentation temperatures greater than 15°C(59°F) and supplement with proper nutrition.


~~~Safale S-04
A well-known English ale yeast, selected for its fast fermentation character and its ability to form a very compact sediment at the end of the fermentation, helping to improve beer clarity. This yeast is recommended for the production of a large range of ale beers and is specially well adapted to cask-conditioned ales and fermentation in cylindroconical tanks. High sedimentation. Optimum temp: 64°-75° F

~~~Safale US-05
A dried American Ale strain with fermentation properties resembling that of Wyeast 1056 (American Ale) or White Labs WLP001 (California Ale). Produces well-balanced beers with low diacetyl and a very clean, crisp palate. Sedimentation is low to medium, and final gravity is medium. Optimum temp: 59°-75° F

~~~Nottingham Ale Yeast
The Nottingham strain was selected for its highly flocculant & relatively full attenuation properties. It produces low concentrations of fruity and estery aromas and has been described as neutral for ale yeast, allowing the full natural flavor of malt & hops to develop.
The recommended fermentation temperature range of this strain is 57° to 70°F with good tolerance to low fermentation temperatures (12°C/54°F) that allow this strain to be used in lager-style beer. With a relatively high alcohol tolerance, Nottingham is a great choice for creation of higher-alcohol specialty beers!

~~~Bourgovin RC 212
The RC 212 is a low-foaming moderate-speed fermenter with an optimum fermentation temperature ranging from 68°. A very low producer of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and sulfur dioxide (SO2), the RC 212 shows good alcohol tolerance to 16%.

The RC 212 is recommended for red varieties where full extraction is desired. Lighter red varieties also benefit from the improved extraction while color stability is maintained throughout fermentation and aging. Aromas of ripe berry and fruit are emphasized while respecting pepper and spicy notes.
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Old 03-13-2013, 01:25 AM   #4
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Thank you!
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Old 03-13-2013, 02:27 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by burshaw
Thank you!
No prob...
I hope it helps some ..
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Old 03-13-2013, 06:25 AM   #6
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How much longer would an 18% cider take to ferment compared to a 14%?

I imagine it would start to get pretty slow towards the end with all the alcohol.

I usually make a 14% cider with EC-1118 and it takes 4-5 weeks to ferment.
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Old 03-13-2013, 01:59 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dog View Post
How much longer would an 18% cider take to ferment compared to a 14%?

I imagine it would start to get pretty slow towards the end with all the alcohol.

I usually make a 14% cider with EC-1118 and it takes 4-5 weeks to ferment.
Good question i would also like to know has anyone had success with a 18% cider or higher?
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Old 03-13-2013, 03:00 PM   #8
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How much sugar do u have to add to get the S.G, high enough to get 14-18%?
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Old 03-13-2013, 04:17 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkKF
How much sugar do u have to add to get the S.G, high enough to get 14-18%?
I just brewed a 5 gal batch yesterday with 8 cups white sugar and 2 brown. The estimated abv was at 12%. I also used a half pound of chopped raisins which I don't believe will be detected by the hygro. I've been using red star Montrachet yeast and it has worked well, usually I end up at 13-14 %. I tried a dry lager yeast this time because I'm fermenting in the garage which stays at about 55-60 deg. We'll se if a slower longer ferment changes the abv but the taste is always excellent . Good luck
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Old 03-13-2013, 04:25 PM   #10
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These things are going to take years to calm down aren't they?


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