obtaining smoked hickory flavor - Home Brew Forums
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Old 03-11-2013, 09:24 PM   #1
beerbellybryan
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Feb 2013
Posts: 6


As the title suggest I've been attempting to get a smoked hickory flavor. Out of the bag the chips have their natural aroma, but after boiling to sterilize the aroma is lost, thinking the aroma is water soluble and gets extracted out. Roasting the same chips didn't bring out the desired effect either. So I soaked some chips for a while and put them on the grill with hickory chunks smoking away. Hoping this will give a noticeable flavor in my porter. Any other suggestions or comments would be awesome.



 
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Old 03-11-2013, 10:03 PM   #2
novaraz
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Jun 2012
Toms River, New Jersey
Posts: 37


May be too late for this suggestion, but you could smoke a few pounds of 2-row with hickory.

Alternatively, soak the charred hickory in vodka and dump the whole mess into the secondary?


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Old 03-12-2013, 12:35 AM   #3
beerbellybryan
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Feb 2013
Posts: 6

Smelling the water which the chips are boiled in actually does have the hickory note, I'm wondering if I could make a concentrate. And I'm actually doing a smoked porter didn't occur to me to smoke the malt myself, DANG YOU HIND SIGHT

 
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Old 03-12-2013, 01:13 AM   #4
doornumber3
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Feb 2013
Boston, Massachusetts
Posts: 246
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might be crazy but they have something called liquid smoke for cooking. You can get this in a few flavors and i'm guessing you'd be ok putting it for the ferment. Not sure, never tried it but it kinda makes sense?

 
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Old 03-12-2013, 06:38 PM   #5
MDRex
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Sep 2010
Baltimore, MD
Posts: 105

A friend used liquid smoke in a beer and said it tasted really bad, undrinkable. I would just smoke the malt if posible. You could also try smoking the wood itself to kill anything and throw that into the beer. Smoke it above 250F and you won't burn the wood(put it on the grill grate not in the charcoal), but should kill off any nasties. May even add even more nice hickory smoke flavor.

 
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Old 03-12-2013, 11:51 PM   #6
doornumber3
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Feb 2013
Boston, Massachusetts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MDRex View Post
A friend used liquid smoke in a beer and said it tasted really bad, undrinkable. I would just smoke the malt if posible. You could also try smoking the wood itself to kill anything and throw that into the beer. Smoke it above 250F and you won't burn the wood(put it on the grill grate not in the charcoal), but should kill off any nasties. May even add even more nice hickory smoke flavor.
Good to know. Glad someone else made the mistake instead of me.

 
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Old 03-13-2013, 01:13 AM   #7
Genuine
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Nov 2011
Putnam, CT
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Well, the thing with liquid smoke, since I use it sometimes in sausage making, etc...You do not need a lot. A VERY LITTLE bit goes a super long way.

I would go with some liquid smoke and try that out. However I would probably use a quarter teaspoon or less. You really don't need much.
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Old 03-13-2013, 01:22 AM   #8
kingwood-kid
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Jul 2008
houston
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Try Briess Cherrywood smoked malt, or smoke your own. I made a porter once with homemade pecan-smoked malt.
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Old 03-13-2013, 01:26 AM   #9
Epimetheus
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Oct 2012
Amherst, MA
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Yeah, very little liquid smoke. I diluted 1/4 teaspoon into 1 teaspoon of water, then used a 1/4 teaspoon of the dilute solution in 5 gallons. I thought it was too strong. Similar experience with maple flavoring just before bottling.
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Old 03-13-2013, 01:42 AM   #10
TahoeRy
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Nov 2012
South Lake Tahoe, California
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Go old school with the stein bier method and smoke some granite rocks on a hickory fire for a few hours or until they are extremely hot and add them to your kettle right before you sparge. Then, slowly sparge into it and the rocks will caramelize and you will obtain that earthy smoke flavor from that. I'm aging an oatmeal stout that I brewed like this and it was pretty cool to use some medieval methods on beer. Plus the caramelized smokey taste in the sugary wort worked out really well.



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