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Old 03-11-2013, 04:53 AM   #1
spaceyaquarius
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1st time kegging. Long story, but basically I tried to force carbonate for 5 days at 30 PSI at 62 F, but the beer was still flat with 1 inch of foam. Then I put it in the mini-fridge for 3 days at 15-18 PSI at 36 F. Today I turned it down to 8 PSI.

It went from 1 inch of foam in a pint glass to nearly half the glass being foam, but the beer still tastes a little flat. Can beer taste flat when it's overcarbonated too? There are quite alot of bubbles coming up the beer line during a glass pour and even after pouring a pint glass.



If it's undercarbonated (which explains the flat taste) but just has high foam then I should just wait longer.

If it's overcarbonated (and still tastes flat, if that's possible) then I'm going to have to release the pressure tab on the keg and then start over right?


Thanks



By the way, the beer lines are 4.7 feet and are cold, and I raise up the tap when I pour. This amount of foam is not from short beer lines is it? Seems like too much foam for that right?
(photo fixed)

 
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Old 03-11-2013, 04:55 AM   #2
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Can't see your photo...{edit} Now I can see it. I would release all the pressure with the value, and put it back on the gas in the minifridge according to the CO2 chart. (there are lots of links to such charts on these forum, sorry I don't have a link handy). What type of beer is this? Most of my beers are in the keezer at 11 psi, but my lines are longer (10 feet).

 
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Old 03-11-2013, 05:55 AM   #3
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Click image for larger version

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Here's the chart in question.
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Old 03-11-2013, 05:59 AM   #4
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Yes, that's the carbonation chart that I used for the last 2 weeks.

 
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Old 03-11-2013, 06:00 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GilSwillBasementBrews View Post

Here's the chart in question.

I know all about the carbonation chart. The chart doesn't tell me the state of carbonation that I have in my beer in the photo (over or under). It doesn't even tell you how many days it will take to reach that level (given the temp, PSI, and carb level desired). I'm asking if the photo looks like overcarbonation, or is it just foamy from short beer lines (4.7 feet). And also if beer can still taste flat if overcarbonated (mine tastes flat).

I'm new to carbonating, but not that new.

 
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Old 03-11-2013, 06:21 AM   #6
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I think it's foamy from short lines. It could be percieved as flat or under carbed due to the co2 coming out of solution from insufficient backpressure when filling the glass. I would try longer lines ( I use 10') and see if that fixes your issue.

Sorry for posting the co2 chart just figured since the one poster commented about not having it handy I would post it up since I have it in hand.
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Old 03-11-2013, 06:26 AM   #7
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The lines could be warm. Tucking the lines near a cooler area of the fridge fixed the problem for me
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Old 03-11-2013, 06:26 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GilSwillBasementBrews View Post
I think it's foamy from short lines. It could be percieved as flat or under carbed due to the co2 coming out of solution from insufficient backpressure when filling the glass. I would try longer lines ( I use 10') and see if that fixes your issue.
Ok, I could see it being from short lines. Of course the store sells you the short lines without mentioning foam. Does anyone else think that the beer line equation should be used, or is 10 foot lines just a good idea?


Two types of resistance exist in the beer lines, vertical resistance (elevation) and horizontal distance (length of lines). A 3/16” tube has a resistance of 3 PSI/ft. Use the following equation to determine the length that you need. Length = (serving pressure – 1)/resistance. If you’re serving a highly carbonated beer at 18 PSI, then (18-1)/3 = 5.5 feet of vinyl tubing is required. So according to this equation, it seems like 10 foot lines would never be necessary. People usually say that regular serving pressure is 6-12 PSI, so that would make tube length less than 5 feet. That doesn't really make sense.

I'm not advocating the equation necessarily, equations can be wrong and if 10 foot lines work, then they work.

 
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Old 03-11-2013, 06:27 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spaceyaquarius View Post
I know all about the carbonation chart. ...

I'm new to carbonating, but not that new.
I see that you've been discussing this issue in two other threads in the last few days, and the chart was given and the equation to figure line length. If I had known you knew all that, I wouldn't have mentioned it. Sorry.

FWIW, short lines almost always our the first pint foamy even when the line is cold and the pressure is right. ymmv.

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Old 03-11-2013, 06:56 AM   #10
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Ok, I realize I'm being very impatient. It's my 1st kegged beer and I screwed it up (at least temporarily). Now that I've drank 3 more pints, the head is a little lower now (2.5-3 inches), and now I can see consistent bubbling (more than champagne bubbles).

I am thinking of concluding that it went from an undercarbed beer to an overcarbed beer overnight (last night). The beer lines are very cold since the fridge is 34-36 F.

I turned the tank down to 8 PSI and that should let some of the CO2 equilibrate as each pint is poured. Didn't mean to be too pushy. I'm new!!!!

 
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