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Old 03-10-2013, 01:38 PM   #11
BigFloyd
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Originally Posted by stratslinger View Post
I read this type of post often, and really have to wonder. Back before I got my chiller, I regularly chilled full 5 gallon boils to pitching temps in less than a half an hour - yet I read folks who take hours to do so...

Place your kettle into your tub (or utility sink, etc) with water as cold as you can get it - no ice - up to the same level as the wort. Then begin stirring your wort with a sanitized spoon. As you do this, gently move the kettle around the tub or sink a little bit to improve the heat transfer, so you're not always transferring to the same warmed water. Do that for 5 minutes or so and you should be down by about 50 or 60 degrees. Drain the sink or tub and repeat, which should get you close to 100. Drain, then refill with ice and cold water, and repeat the stirring and moving around routine.
Your water must be one heck of a lot colder than it is here. The coldest our tap gets in the middle of winter is 60*F. In Texas, you have to use ice in your chiller water once you get down to about 80-85*F depending on the time of the year.

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Sure, it's a little work - but just sitting the kettle in ice and waiting on it is not an effective cooling method for large volumes of wort.
+1. You've got to stir, even with an immersion chiller.

To the other folks, if you want to do no-chill, go for it. It's your beer. May it be forever tasty.


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Old 03-10-2013, 01:42 PM   #12
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+1 to experiencing no problem with next day pitch.

I've found there's a lot of "facts" and fears about brewing that simply are not supported by experimentation. I've done this many times w/o chill haze, so it's not guaranteed to arise.


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Old 03-10-2013, 04:24 PM   #13
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I no-chill in the kettle all the time w/ good results. Yes, the beer will likely have harmless proteins or chill haze, but will drop clear after cold aging for a week or two...I keg so my beer is stored cold and drops nice and clear after cold storage. Also, I have read that if you are going to do an extended chill, delicate hop flavors and aroma are best preserved at temps below 160 - 170, so after flameout I wait an hour or two for the wort temp to drop and then make my last addition below 170 degrees.

FWIW, much better to wait and pitch the yeast at a proper temperature, than pitching quickly into wort that is too hot!

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Sure, it's a little work - but just sitting the kettle in ice and waiting on it is not an effective cooling method for large volumes of wort.
Not true in my experience at all! I have an immersion chiller and don't use it very often, I either no chill in the ketttle, or place the kettle (8 gal batch) in a large tub, 1/2 of a 55 gal HDPE barrel, fill with water and about 10 frozen 2 liter bottles, a few hours later we are at pitching temps w/ no babysitting a chiller...to each their own.

During summer, when tap water is warm, ice will likely be needed at some point to reach 60-65 degrees, rather than using the chiller, I find it simpler to just use the large tub and ice, I have a beer fridge / keezer, and the freezer compartment holds plenty of frozen soda bottles for wort chilling.
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Old 03-10-2013, 06:26 PM   #14
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FWIW, much better to wait and pitch the yeast at a proper temperature, than pitching quickly into wort that is too hot!
+1. I think it pains all of us to see people post about pitching yeast into 80+ degree wort. For ales, I stop the flow when it gets to 66*F. This time of year, that takes about 15 minutes with 60*F hose water and some stirring every couple of minutes. Most of that time is spent going from 80* down to pitching temp.

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During summer, when tap water is warm, ice will likely be needed at some point to reach 60-65 degrees, rather than using the chiller, I find it simpler to just use the large tub and ice, I have a beer fridge / keezer, and the freezer compartment holds plenty of frozen soda bottles for wort chilling.
That sounds like a workable method. I wish my keezer were big enough to chill all those bottles. Mine's pretty full with 3 kegs and a CO2 tank and has no separate freezer section.
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Old 03-10-2013, 06:53 PM   #15
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FWIW, much better to wait and pitch the yeast at a proper temperature, than pitching quickly into wort that is too hot!
Amen. This quote alone should be a sticky in the New Brewer's area!
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Old 03-10-2013, 07:28 PM   #16
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After switching to a wort chiller, I've only brewed twice. I may need to play with me recipe, I preferred my beer the way it was letting it sit over night.

I hesitated to get a wort chiller because I didn't want to waste water. Then came across a clearance item at Lowe's. I got 60 feet if 3/8 copper tubing for $18. Wrapped it around a bucket, instead if a corny, got some fittings. It will cool 11 gallons or wort to just under 80 degrees using only 20 gallons of water. I just save that water for clean up.


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