Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Bottling/Kegging > Help with first-time force carbing and kegging
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-10-2013, 12:23 AM   #1
DylanTO
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 47
Likes Given: 41

Default Help with first-time force carbing and kegging

Hey all,

I would greatly appreciate some advice here.
I just got a 5gal corny keg and am force carbing for the first time.
The coldest that I am able to get the beer in my keg down to is 52' F.
I am trying to carb an IPA.
Beersmith tells me to have the pressure at ~20psi @ ~52' F. It has been sitting at this pressure for about 10 days.

I am trying to pour a beer to test it for carbonation (plus I'm thirsty ) and I am getting 90% foam. The resulting beer in the glass is just as flat as you would expect it to be after all that foaming.

I am using ~6 feet of 3/8" beer line with a cobra tap.
I am serving at 5 - 10 psi (i've tried everything in between).

So, what can I try to get this beer to relax and quit foaming?
Does it matter whether the cobra tap sits above or below the keg?

I took it off of the 20psi, vented the pressure from the keg, and then immediately put the co2 back on at 10psi for serving. Does it need time to rest?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated!


DylanTO is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2013, 12:32 AM   #2
wilsojos
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 290
Liked 21 Times on 18 Posts

Default

Do you have any longer serving lines? 10 ft maybe? I never have it that warm so I'm not sure what impact that has.


wilsojos is offline
DylanTO Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2013, 01:10 AM   #3
jabbott
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 5
Liked 3 Times on 2 Posts

Default

You should be using 3/16" beer line, not 3/8" line, or you'd need over 100 feet of line to balance the serving pressure.

Here is a helpful page which talks about figuring out the right beer line length. This will allow you to achieve an ideal pour. Mike Soltys in the comments section posted a calculator on Google Docs which is the most comprehensive calculator I've seen for doing this. I just leave all the entries beneath the hose length unchanged.
http://beersmith.com/blog/2011/07/14...of-draft-beer/

Another benefit of balancing line lengths is that you won't need to purge the CO2 and adjust the regulator pressure for serving, you can just serve at the same pressure that you've been carbonating the beer at (assuming you're carbonating via the set-and-forget method). If you don't want to deal with calculating the line length, try 10 feet of 3/16" line and if it pours too slowly, trim it a little and try again.

Also I use this chart for knowing what pressure to force carbonate at for different styles and temps... but it sounds like Beersmith does this for you already:
http://www.kegerators.com/carbonation-table.php
jabbott is offline
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2013, 02:00 AM   #4
DylanTO
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 47
Likes Given: 41

Default

@jabbot Thanks!
I just checked the line and it is 3/16". My bad.
After looking at that table from the second link, I think I overshot the pressure and should have had it at 16 - 18psi.
If the beer is indeed overcarbonated now, do I need to shake, bleed pressure, repeat? or can I just reduce the pressure that's sitting on it and wait?

Thanks again for the help! Sorry to be that noob.
DylanTO is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2013, 02:11 AM   #5
BansheeRider
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
BansheeRider's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,509
Liked 101 Times on 92 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

I think your problem is that you forced carbed for 10 days. At 20psi I think 48 hours is plenty. I do 30psi for 36 and then set to serving pressure after purging the keg. You should disconnect the gas and purge the keg and let it sit for 24 hours. Check the carbonation every 12 or 24 hours and purge.
__________________
Good judgement comes from experience, experience comes from bad judgement.
BansheeRider is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2013, 05:49 AM   #6
jabbott
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 5
Liked 3 Times on 2 Posts

Default

I wouldn't consider 20 PSI to be that over-carbed if you were shooting for 16-18 PSI... other than trying a longer line length, or periodically warming and purging until the pressure gets to where you want it to be, you should also inspect the inside of your beer line quick disconnect to make sure it isn't obstructing flow. Some of the plastic ones aren't molded properly when they're made and as such they turn carbonated beer going through them into lots of foam. See the reviews at the link below which talk about the problem in more detail:
http://www.midwestsupplies.com/revie.../list/id/4272/

Here is a QD disassembly guide:
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/ball...d-view-261615/

Another thing is to make sure you're opening the tap all the way to dispense instead of just partially opening it.
jabbott is offline
DylanTO Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2013, 06:45 AM   #7
spaceyaquarius
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Oklahoma City, OK
Posts: 402
Liked 8 Times on 8 Posts
Likes Given: 61

Default

Same thing happened to me, I tried to force carbonate for 5 days at 30 PSI and then burped the keg (but I think I actually let all the pressure out). Then turned the pressure to 18 PSI and it's still flat. I guess it never got carbonated, so I'm just leaving it alone on 15 PSI now and checking it once a day.
spaceyaquarius is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2013, 07:33 AM   #8
JuanMoore
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
JuanMoore's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: The Old Pueblo
Posts: 18,653
Liked 3389 Times on 3269 Posts
Likes Given: 20

Default

It's going to be near impossible to serve without excessive foam with a moderately high carbonation level at that temperature. The warmer the beer is, or the more carbonated, the more the CO2 wants to come out of solution and cause foaming. This means that you'll need extremely long lines to slow the pour down to a snails pace to minimize the foam, and even then it will still likely foam quite a bit. If I were you I'd be looking at ways to get the beer colder, or shoot for a lower carbonation level, or both. If you're sure you want that serving temp, and 2.5-2.6 vol, then you're gonna need 25-30' lines, or maybe slightly shorter if you use the epoxy mixer sticks in the diptube. And to answer your question about where to hold the cobra faucet, the higher you can hold it, the more resistance gravity will provide, making the pour slower and hopefully minimizing the foam.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BansheeRider View Post
I think your problem is that you forced carbed for 10 days. At 20psi I think 48 hours is plenty. I do 30psi for 36 and then set to serving pressure after purging the keg. You should disconnect the gas and purge the keg and let it sit for 24 hours. Check the carbonation every 12 or 24 hours and purge.
At 52 and 20 psi, the maximum carbonation level that it could have reached is 2.61 vol. At that warm temp, 48hrs at 20psi would have barely carbonated the beer at all. Your process and pressures don't correlate well to what I'd guess is a vastly different serving temperature from yours.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jabbott View Post
Here is a helpful page which talks about figuring out the right beer line length. This will allow you to achieve an ideal pour. Mike Soltys in the comments section posted a calculator on Google Docs which is the most comprehensive calculator I've seen for doing this. I just leave all the entries beneath the hose length unchanged.
http://beersmith.com/blog/2011/07/14...of-draft-beer/
The beersmith article is misleading and not very good for homebrewers IMO, but the Mike Soltys spreadsheet in the comments section is awesome. The hard part is figuring out the pint fill time that won't create foaming for a specific temperature and carbonation level.


__________________
Keezer Soze

Yuri rubs it out with 60 grit... wouldn't even feel a tenga egg. -Randar

, place entry ox dixla to suck. Fcxk fwnpoo and passed. Hel an my spupid ass. OK. - TXCrash
JuanMoore is offline
DylanTO Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Kegging/force carbing bel Bottling/Kegging 19 03-03-2013 11:39 PM
Kegging, force carbing question. DonPritchard Bottling/Kegging 4 11-13-2012 01:12 AM
Kegging and Force Carbing Champagne howabouttheiris Wine Making Forum 0 03-16-2012 12:49 PM
First time kegging and force carbing, any tips? Frankfurtvr4 Bottling/Kegging 14 06-27-2010 03:41 PM
First time kegging question about force carbing GroosBrewz Soda Making 4 03-05-2009 08:45 PM


Forum Jump

Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS