Non-oak wood & extract methods - Home Brew Forums
Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Recipes/Ingredients > Non-oak wood & extract methods
Cool Brewing Giveaway - Supporting Membership Drive & Discount

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-07-2013, 04:22 PM   #1
Tiroux
Recipes 
 
Sep 2012
Thurso, Québec
Posts: 470
Liked 10 Times on 8 Posts



Okay! I'm a guitar builder and I wood lover. Wood is often present in my cooking, and my beers, but all we see is oak.

Part 1- non-oak woods

Who tried what?

Aromatic woods i can think of:
Maple
Cedar
Walnut
Hickory
Cherry
Applewood
Etc...

All wood are toxic to a point, but some are more than others. Dust from wal ut, by example is very bad, and many people have allergic reaction when breathing the dust. What about when it's infused in a liquid? Would be great to learn more about it.

Part 2 - extract methods

Wood chips in secondary or barrel aging seem to be the prefered way, but it have to implies big abv beers because wood sanitation aint easy. It's hard to flavor a 4% abv beer with chips without infecting it.

The next time, I will try something new and would like to have some hints a out my idea. That's pretty simple: buy a 26oz of 94% ethanol, then infuse wood in it (green, dry or roasted). I could create different extract this way and be safe on the sanitation side. Would do you think? I might try it with nuts and spices too.

Thanks!



 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2013, 06:38 PM   #2
tennesseean_87
Recipes 
 
Aug 2011
Bismarck, ND
Posts: 1,481
Liked 133 Times on 97 Posts


People soak chips in booze for sanitation all the time. You might also steam/boil the chips or toast them in the oven for sanitation.


__________________
#8 Corks in Belgian Bottles Hold Carbonation
Increasing Pipeline Diversity
Drinking: Irish Red, Hoppy Brown, Belgian Export Stout, Oktoberfest, Dubbel
Fermenting: Belgian Saison, Session Steam(ish)
On Deck: Pilsner/Schwarzbier split batch, Berliner Weiss? White IPA?

Youtube Channel on Homebrewing ::: Youtube Channel on Pipe Smoking

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2013, 06:43 PM   #3
TyTanium
Recipes 
 
Nov 2011
Posts: 3,952
Liked 553 Times on 389 Posts


There was a word doc floating around out there called "Got wood" that listed flavor profiles of a bunch of non-oak woods:

Alder – limited feedback but not positive
Apple – a little sour and raw with some pecan or sweet nuttiness
Beech – after cooking the bejeesus out of these chips, they are no longer buoyant or possess any flavor; they are utilized to allow more surface area for the yeast during fermentations to accelerate diacetyl and acetaldehyde reduction
Cedar -
• Aromatic Cedar (aka Juniper, Eastern Red Cedar) – sweet, smooth, aromatic, interesting character
• Spanish Cedar (aka Cedrela, Cedro, Cigar Box Cedar) – sweet, smooth, aromatic, interesting character
• Traditional Cedar – very strong cedar characteristics come through; can be bitter and tannic
Cherry – great vanilla scent and flavor with some raw wood character
Hickory – rich wood flavor with some evergreen and floral notes; too much can present a harsh paint thinner character
Maple – very mild with a clean finish
Mesquite – dark, rich wood flavors possibly with some pine and molasses
Nutwood – buttery, rich, with some mild sweetness and smokiness
Olive – raw wood with vanilla, sweetness, and evergreen notes
Palo Santo – slight molasses, charcoal, roastiness, and smokiness
Spruce – adds a fragrant pine character
Wormwood – the principal ingredient in Absinthe; use at your own risk

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2013, 08:35 PM   #4
kingwood-kid
Recipes 
 
Jul 2008
houston
Posts: 1,541
Liked 107 Times on 96 Posts


I am assuming (which is like guessing, except that the pitch of one's voice doesn't go up at the end of the sentence) almost any wood you can barbecue/smoke with would be fine to soak with and would lend similar characteristics. Since French Canada is not generally considered part of the barbecue belt, I would say that these woods would include much of what Ty mentioned, as well as many fruit woods.
__________________
Say no to intolerance: love gluten and lactose.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2013, 10:41 PM   #5
Tiroux
Recipes 
 
Sep 2012
Thurso, Québec
Posts: 470
Liked 10 Times on 8 Posts


That's great info! On the flavors, I think my way will be to experiment.

My question is more about the technique... I know many people do it with whisky or something like that, I've done it in the past, but i'm wondering if I can get a more neutral extraction from 94% ethanol?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2013, 10:43 PM   #6
tennesseean_87
Recipes 
 
Aug 2011
Bismarck, ND
Posts: 1,481
Liked 133 Times on 97 Posts


I bet it would, but who wants neutral when you can have bourbon!?!
__________________
#8 Corks in Belgian Bottles Hold Carbonation
Increasing Pipeline Diversity
Drinking: Irish Red, Hoppy Brown, Belgian Export Stout, Oktoberfest, Dubbel
Fermenting: Belgian Saison, Session Steam(ish)
On Deck: Pilsner/Schwarzbier split batch, Berliner Weiss? White IPA?

Youtube Channel on Homebrewing ::: Youtube Channel on Pipe Smoking

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2013, 11:24 PM   #7
kingwood-kid
Recipes 
 
Jul 2008
houston
Posts: 1,541
Liked 107 Times on 96 Posts


Bourbon isn't bourbon until it hits charred white oak. What goes into the barrels is basically Everclear. So the 94% ethanol idea sounds...um, sound. Judging how that would integrate into a particular beer is the tricky part. You'll also get very different results with raw wood vs. charred or oven toasted. If you conduct an experiment, I would be fascinated with the results.
__________________
Say no to intolerance: love gluten and lactose.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2013, 11:53 PM   #8
Tiroux
Recipes 
 
Sep 2012
Thurso, Québec
Posts: 470
Liked 10 Times on 8 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by tennesseean_87 View Post
I bet it would, but who wants neutral when you can have bourbon!?!
Bourbon is all about oak. The thread is about NON-oak.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2013, 11:58 PM   #9
Tiroux
Recipes 
 
Sep 2012
Thurso, Québec
Posts: 470
Liked 10 Times on 8 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by kingwood-kid View Post
Bourbon isn't bourbon until it hits charred white oak. What goes into the barrels is basically Everclear. So the 94% ethanol idea sounds...um, sound. Judging how that would integrate into a particular beer is the tricky part. You'll also get very different results with raw wood vs. charred or oven toasted. If you conduct an experiment, I would be fascinated with the results.
Yhea that's the point, I want the full flavor of the wood (raw and toasted) whitout anything else.

Now, the tricky part as said would be to doze it in the beer. I also guess that I could not just ''taste'' the extract... since 94% is pretty f-ing intense! Maybe I could cut it down to 40 ou 60% so it stays a bacterias killer but become more managable to taste or things like that...

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2013, 01:01 PM   #10
924RACR
Recipes 
 
Nov 2011
Royal Oak, MI
Posts: 104
Liked 6 Times on 5 Posts


I should imagine a vodka soaking would work well, without adding significant non-wood flavor...

Good thread, very tempting! When grilling or smoking, we (meaning wife and I) tend to much more generally prefer the fruit woods (whereas by myself I'm all for hickory or mesquite)...



 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Aging methods eaferreira Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 14 12-10-2012 02:11 AM
Wood chips or wood chip tea? sierramadrebrewer General Techniques 3 06-19-2012 02:37 PM
An Experiment with Maple Sugars and Wood (extract) PinowskiAP Recipes/Ingredients 0 03-24-2012 02:31 AM
Other methods of carbonation? Bubbles541 Cider Forum 4 09-29-2010 01:17 PM
Aeration methods? chef201atc Mead Forum 8 03-26-2010 11:14 PM


Forum Jump