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Old 03-06-2013, 06:07 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by ncbrewer View Post
Each pound of table sugar per gallon adds 46 gravity points (raises gravity by 0.046)
Um, not quite. it adds 46 points - .046 if added to only 1 gallon. If added to 5 gallons, it will add 46 points but bring the gravity up by only .009 (46/5).

So assuming the OP added 1 kg which is 2.2lb, he should have added about 100 points (101.2) but only raised the gravity .020 - he said .010 (1.040 to 1.050).

relation between sugar points and gravity is that sugar points are expressed in points per gallon (usually points per pound gallon) and thus need to be divided by the volume of the wort/beer.


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Old 03-06-2013, 06:12 PM   #22
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You should ride this beer out, as is. It is basically past the point where you could add anything useful, except maybe do some dry hopping. But I wouldn't do that until it is fermented out and you've tasted your hydrometer sample.

Now keep in mind, this beer really doesn't have enough maltiness to sustain a lot of hops to keep or create a good flavor balance. It will always be a very dry beer.

Reading this book may improve your understanding of creating better beer:

http://www.howtobrew.com/section1/index.html

If you're on a (tight) budget wouldn't you rather save up for one good brew once in while than buy multiple so-so-provide-your-own-sugar kits?

There are many kits available ranging from very marginal quality through all levels of mediocre-ness to actually some very good ones. Cost sometimes being an indication of quality, but not generally as a rule.

Or alternatively, buy the ingredients needed for one of Palmer's recipes, or one you found here.


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Old 03-06-2013, 06:46 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by IslandLizard View Post
You should ride this beer out, as is. It is basically past the point where you could add anything useful, except maybe do some dry hopping. But I wouldn't do that until it is fermented out and you've tasted your hydrometer sample.

Now keep in mind, this beer really doesn't have enough maltiness to sustain a lot of hops to keep or create a good flavor balance. It will always be a very dry beer.

Reading this book may improve your understanding of creating better beer:

http://www.howtobrew.com/section1/index.html

If you're on a (tight) budget wouldn't you rather save up for one good brew once in while than buy multiple so-so-provide-your-own-sugar kits?

There are many kits available ranging from very marginal quality through all levels of mediocre-ness to actually some very good ones. Cost sometimes being an indication of quality, but not generally as a rule.

Or alternatively, buy the ingredients needed for one of Palmer's recipes, or one you found here.
Alright I'll read this. Thanks for your well articulated response.
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Old 03-06-2013, 07:04 PM   #24
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Alright I'll read this. Thanks for your well articulated response.
You're very welcome. That book is one of the best references in the home brewer's field, and friendly to those new to this great hobby.

I'm glad the complete content is available online, and in time it wouldn't hurt any home brewer to own a hard copy of it. I've seen it for $7.60 on Amazon and even lower used.

Also this forum is a marvelous resource. In my 2 short months here I've already learnt more techniques and pointers than in 4 years of off-and-on brewing.
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Old 03-06-2013, 07:18 PM   #25
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Only issue with 'how to brew' is that it was written some time ago when homebrewing was still young - or younger. The concern of autolysis (yeast breakdown/ yeast eating yeast) is overstated for the typical homebrewer. Maybe if you are making in conicals, but not for the typical. What this means is that you don't have to secondary, but can if you wish. I think Palmer has updated it for the latest edition, but the online is the 1st edition and thus has some older thoughts.
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Old 03-06-2013, 11:35 PM   #26
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I have the 3rd and latest edition (2006) and he still mentions the secondary fermentor to prevent autolysis.

I hope he's revising again with attention to modern techniques such as BIAB, hop spiders, hop baskets, hop stands, whirlpooling, dry hop methods, and anything else that's current here.

It is hard to keep up when home brewing is reaching high krausen.
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Old 03-07-2013, 01:29 AM   #27
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It is hard to keep up when home brewing is reaching high krausen.
LOL.. that is great.

If a person does a search on autolysis, or secondary ffermnetors, eventaully up comes a pod cast that palmer did where he basically says "yeah it isn't as big a problem for HB as was originally thought" I thought he was getting it into a book, but if the last revision was 2006, and I think the podcast was late 2009... well there is the problem. He needs a TARDIS
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Old 03-07-2013, 08:43 PM   #28
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How should I have made this kit with malt extract?
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Old 03-07-2013, 09:28 PM   #29
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Substituting malt extract for your sugar. 500 grams of dry malt extract and 500 grams of brewing sugar has given me good results on two brews
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Old 03-07-2013, 09:38 PM   #30
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Wish I would have known that sooner lol. I thought adding sugar would have increased it a lot. So I only added around what 1%?
well it will in 5 gallons add 1% per pound of sugar. if you added 1kg, it will add a bit over 2% per kg on 5 gallons/19L

As for how to do this with malt?

I probably would have replaced the sugar (especially if if was table sugar) with DME. 1 for 1. They have about the same sugar point DME is 44 to 46. Frankly I think I've seen ratings of sugar from 44 to 46, so I guess it depends on who was measuring. But 2 on 46 is only about 4% so good enough I figure.

Now a problem with adding DME is that it doesn't add the same ABV because Malt isn't 100% fermentable like sugar is, so although you'd add about 46pts per pound - about 9 points in 5 gallons (sorry doing that pound gallon thing) the fermentables are about 75 to 80% with Malt (depending on yeast attenuation. 75% is a good number to work with), so it will add slightly less than 1% per pound, although if you by it in kg and get 1 kg it should add about 2% - since as sugar it would have added over 2%.

I'm not sure on how bitterness balance woudl work out. you might need a little more hops to help balance, or might not.

For yoru original recipe, it was 1 can (1.5kg) LME and 1 kg of sugar. I'd have done the 1.5kg of LME and anodther 1 to 1.5KG of DME. But again that is just the malt. Although that seems to be what your recipe called for from what you said.

Another option, would be do do less water. with the can of LME - and only the can. Instead of 20L do say 12 to 15L or even 10L. This way you don't dilute the hoppiness. >or maybe not this idea I'm really just this writing faster than I'm evaluating<

Some basics for you - 8pt gravity change is about 1%abv (or close enough for simple calcs). Sugar and DME add 46 points per pound gallon (ie 1 lb in 1 gallon) LME adds about 36 (35 to 37) Honey(US) is about the same.
With this you can take your Extract/sugar/etc and figure out what the OG should about be. say within 1 or 2 points. So 5 lb of DME with 5 gallons should get an og of 5*46/5=230points/5 = 46! or with 6lb 6*46/5=276/5=55.

That can be a basis for figuring out alcohol content. But that doesn't help with balance of flavor. Balancing the sweet of the malt, the feel of the alcohol and the bitters of the hop are beyond this post.


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