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Old 03-07-2013, 08:08 PM   #11
Saxomophone
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Feb 2010
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If you do what you described in your 1st post, you should wait till you combine the boiling water and wort before you start your hop additions. Otherwise you will be adding your hops to a higher gravity wort and getting worse utilization.

I do 5 gallon (sometimes starting with 7gal) boils on my electric stove, but my pot is so big that I can actually put it on two burners at once.

 
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Old 03-07-2013, 08:16 PM   #12
cram
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Heavy duty aluminum foil under the burner can also bump up a gas stove's heating potential since it reflects heat upward (plus, it helps with cleanup). And I have found that leaving an IC in the pot will get a large quantity of wort to boiling when the burner by itself will not.

 
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Old 03-08-2013, 06:37 PM   #13
Malty_Dog
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Saxomophone View Post
If you do what you described in your 1st post, you should wait till you combine the boiling water and wort before you start your hop additions. Otherwise you will be adding your hops to a higher gravity wort and getting worse utilization.
I hear you Saxomophone, fortunately I did not start any hop additions until the full rolling boil. I do need to get a better grasp of hop utilization with these full(er) boils, so that I can adjust downward when and where necessary.
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Old 03-09-2013, 12:56 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malty_Dog View Post
To make this brief: I like the idea of doing full boils, and I have a decently powerful GE Profile stove (gas) with a large burner. I know bringing 6.5 gallons to a rolling boil will take a while (1 hr+). I do have a nice 7.5 gallon pot.

My question: is there any possible value in bringing, say, 2-3 gallons of water to a boil in a separate vessel while simultaneously boiling my main 3-4 gallons of wort, then simply dumping the 2-3 gallons into the larger wort boil? Any downsides? Not worth it? Again, just an idea.
Worst I can think of is the unexpected "Oooooooooopppppssssssss!!!!!" where you may drop the pot or spill the water/wort....

Ouch.

 
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Old 03-11-2013, 10:53 PM   #15
Echoloc8
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Yeah, I don't relish the idea of big boiling-water pours on top of a running stove.

I use this 1000W heat stick/bucket warmer:

http://www.amazon.com/MARSHALLTOWN-P...=bucket+warmer

It's just the thing (along with using 2 of the range's "eyes" at once) for taking 5 gallons of room-temp water to mash-in temp in 15-20 min, and 8 gals from mash-out to boiling in 15-20 min. Even works well with my buddy's decades-old half-busted stove.

-Rich
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Old 03-12-2013, 06:48 AM   #16
optaka
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I just finished my 2000W heat stick following 3d0gs instructions (with 1 slight modification to the grounding wire) and it is wonderful. Takes my tap water to boil time down from 51 minutes to 21 minutes.

 
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Old 03-12-2013, 07:19 PM   #17
jhall4
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Probably the lowest tech solution is just to insulate your kettle.

I take a bath towel and fold it such that it covers about 90% of the kettle - so that the bottom is exposed to mitigate the chance of an accidental fire - and then hold it in place with a bungee cord.

Works like a charm. Without the pot spewing heat into the room, I can heat everything faster and achieve a more vigorous boil.

 
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Old 03-12-2013, 08:59 PM   #18
klindeman
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Jan 2013
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jhall4
Probably the lowest tech solution is just to insulate your kettle.

I take a bath towel and fold it such that it covers about 90% of the kettle - so that the bottom is exposed to mitigate the chance of an accidental fire - and then hold it in place with a bungee cord.

Works like a charm. Without the pot spewing heat into the room, I can heat everything faster and achieve a more vigorous boil.
Any numbers on how much this improved your boil time?

 
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Old 03-14-2013, 02:57 AM   #19
eric19312
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Here is a link to my experiment with the multi-pot boil. http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f14/full...08/index3.html

TBH pouring 2-3 gallons of boiling water from one pot into by 10 gal pot just isn't any big deal. Maybe if I was it would be something to consider but it is not a "feat of strength" or dexterity any more than say draining pasta water into a colander...

 
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Old 03-14-2013, 04:11 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eric19312 View Post
TBH pouring 2-3 gallons of boiling water from one pot into by 10 gal pot just isn't any big deal. Maybe if I was it would be something to consider but it is not a "feat of strength" or dexterity any more than say draining pasta water into a colander...
Good to hear, but when you get to the range of 4 to 6 gallons of transfer it can get lots trickier. It also doesn't take much of a spill at these temperatures to scald yourself (or someone else) and cast a pall over an otherwise great brew day. This is why the big keggles and pots usually wind up with drain valves, to make a siphon or pump do the work and alleviate the risk.

I know I routinely pour big (4+ gal) strike water additions into my mash tun, and every so often I'll goof the pour and slop some 170+ degree water around. I haven't been (badly) burned yet, but I know better than to think I've been anything other than lucky. I try never to pour water any hotter than sparge temps, always use pot holders or welding gloves, and never pour any more frequently than I have to.

-Rich
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