High gravity at secondary on stout - Home Brew Forums
Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > High gravity at secondary on stout
Cool Brewing Giveaway - Supporting Membership Drive & Discount

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-05-2013, 04:08 AM   #1
Blades13
Recipes 
 
Mar 2013
Posts: 4


I've been brewing for a few months now and lately I've been experimenting with my own recipes, all partial mashes. In my latest experiment I was aiming for a coffee stout. It could be early to ask this question but I just switched it over into secondary ferment after 2 weeks in primary so I think it's valid.

I had an OG of about 1.058 before primary and after two weeks my gravity reads at 1.04. Aside from the fact that I still want it to drop about .03, but this seems very high after 2 weeks. I tried the beer and it isn't sweet. It tastes like it should to me. I'm not sure what has gone wrong so far. The only thing I can think of is that the fermentation temperature could be a little cold, we keep our house at 58F in the winter and I don't have a way to warm the brews during ferment as of yet, however I haven't had any problems with any of my previous beers although they haven't been perfect. I used Lallemand Windsor British-style beer yeast.

Any advice is much appreciated!



 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-05-2013, 06:13 AM   #2
helibrewer
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
helibrewer's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Nov 2011
Santa Rosa, CA
Posts: 3,705
Liked 299 Times on 254 Posts


You need to warm that yeast, even if you have a heating pad you can use around the fermenter. That beer should finish in the teens for FG. 1.015 would be 75% attenuation.


__________________
Something is always fermenting....
"It's Bahl Hornin'"

Primary:
Brite Tank/Lagering:
Kegged: Sour Saison, Pale Ale, Aggie Ale, Firestone DBA, De Koninck Blonde
Bottled: Belgian Quad (Grand Reserve), Derangement (Belgian Dark Strong)
On Deck: Pliny the Younger

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2013, 09:35 PM   #3
Blades13
Recipes 
 
Mar 2013
Posts: 4

Thanks. I have it wrapped in fermwrap now and it is warmed up. It has started to bubble but very slowly. Is there any reason to think I may have to add more yeast?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2013, 11:30 PM   #4
frazier
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Recipes 
 
Dec 2009
illinois
Posts: 1,885
Liked 158 Times on 134 Posts


OK so you started at 1.058, and now you're stuck at 1.040? That's a problem.

IIRC, those Windsor yeast packs are small, like 5 grams, right? If you used one, you seriously under-pitched. So it may have gotten off to a sluggish start.

Second, you took the beer off the yeast cake long before it was ready for such a move. You will have trouble getting much more attenuation. You should wait until you have reached FG before moving the beer to secondary.

Adding more yeast is a desperation move, since the presence of alcohol and the absence of oxygen will make it difficult for the new yeast to reproduce. I have heard of trying to make a big starter and pitching it at high kraeusen, but your overall chances of success are small.

Having said all that, I will confess that I also have had a very high finish - 1.034 - the cause of which I never really did diagnose. But after I started paying a lot of attention to conditions at pitching time, I started getting good attenuation. My guess is that this may end up being one of those batches, which happen to all of us from time to time, which just isn't that great. But you will learn from it, and do better in the future.


Cheers!
__________________
~
"Anything worth doing, is worth doing slowly." ~~ Mae West

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2013, 11:35 PM   #5
duboman
Recipes 
 
Jul 2011
Glenview, IL
Posts: 6,368
Liked 507 Times on 469 Posts


Out of curiosity is this being read with a hydrometer or refractometer?

If the latter, use the former

Also, if you were concerned about the gravity, why'd you rack off the yeast? Makes things a little more difficult to try and correct
__________________
Nothing Left to do but smile and drink beer.....

The Commune Brewing Company-Perfecting the "art" of beer since 2010

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2013, 08:29 PM   #6
Blades13
Recipes 
 
Mar 2013
Posts: 4

Frazier, the yeast packets are 11.5g so it wasn't under-pitched. It certainly started fermenting immediately. I think it stalled due to temperature and it has started again, slowly, with the heat. Hopefully I can get a new reading this weekend and see where it's at. If it's still high I will probably try pitching another large yeast starter and hope for the best.

Dubo, A refractometer looks fancy, maybe later. I like my hydrometer and rough readings. I racked it because I was hoping it was going to be so high, I probably should take the reading first in the future...

It's all an experiment right?

Thanks

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2013, 08:46 PM   #7
Demus
Recipes 
 
Dec 2011
Orlando, FL
Posts: 1,242
Liked 160 Times on 131 Posts


No need to rack a stout at all in the future. The less you mess with them, the better they turn out. If it's bubbling again, even slowly since you warmed it up just give it a few more weeks and check the gravity again. Re-pitching seldom works well so that should be a last resort...

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2013, 02:18 AM   #8
Cyclman
I Sell Koalas
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
Cyclman's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jan 2013
Aurora, CO
Posts: 6,102
Liked 714 Times on 597 Posts


No need to rack any beer unless you're adding something or ageing it. Hopefully you'll reach a good FG, Stouts can tolerate a fairly high FG, but you want as much yeast to finish the beer as possible

Since it's already been racked, you may need to leave it 3-4 weeks in secondary to achieve FG (same reading > 3 days).
__________________
Give a man a beer, waste an hour. Teach a man to brew, and waste a lifetime! Bill Owen quote

Why does Happy Hour limit happiness to 1/24 of the day?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2013, 06:20 AM   #9
Blades13
Recipes 
 
Mar 2013
Posts: 4

I'm going to try and check the gravity this week, I'll let you know how it goes. I guess it kind makes sense that a stout doesn't have to be racked, but as for other beers, they don't have to be racked sure, but if you want a clear beer without sediment it is much better. I didn't believe in it either at first. Thanks for all the help.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2013, 03:18 PM   #10
Beergazzi
Recipes 
 
Feb 2013
Posts: 113
Liked 15 Times on 11 Posts


From one new brewer to another, my first 5 gal batch was a stout, OG in the 1.055 range. It fermented like mad for 24 hours down to 1.023ish and stopped. I was hoping for 1.015ish.

Temps started warm, too warm, pitched in the upper mid 80s (I know..I know) and then into my basement it went where is dropped to low 60s.

After 2 weeks being stagnant at 1.023/1.022, I decided to move it into my dining room next to a heater vent and probably got it up 3-5 degrees. After 1 day, 1.020, day 3, 1.018, last couple of days 1.016, and that diacetly punch you in the face odor has dissapated nicely.

So its into bottles tonight for me. Glad I decided to 'let it finish' warmer, cause I'd have had a lot'o'foam in those bottles.



 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Gravity high in secondary krahm Fermentation & Yeast 8 07-06-2012 05:54 PM
high gravity stout trigger Fermentation & Yeast 1 11-11-2010 06:14 AM
High Gravity Secondary? at 70' or 50'? 5 Is Not Enough General Techniques 10 02-14-2008 03:55 AM
Very High Gravity Stout dmend Extract Brewing 1 02-02-2007 04:13 AM
high gravity stout boxerdoglover Recipes/Ingredients 7 02-25-2006 06:50 PM


Forum Jump