Flanders Red or Brown - leave on yeast? - Home Brew Forums
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Old 03-05-2013, 12:43 AM   #1
oach
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Sep 2009
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Hey All,

Never brewed one before but I am curious if I should leave the beer on the yeast cake the entire time I have it in a carboy or do I rack to secondary? If so, how long do you usually wait to rack (2 weeks, 4 weeks, etc)?

Cheers,
Scot



 
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Old 03-05-2013, 07:30 AM   #2
dannyhawkins
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Are you doing a sacc fermentation before and or with the bacterial culture?
If so I believe the consensus is to allow primary fermentation to finish then rack to secondary. The bacteria and some yeast will carry over to the secondary and take care of everything.
If you are only pitching bacteria then you can pitch the vial and forget it.
I am no expert but I felt I could offer a few helpful hints.
You do not need to make a starter with the bacterial mix, if you are fermenting with yeast and bugs the yeast only should have a starter.
Again this is my interpretation of info from lurking here.
Good luck



 
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Old 03-05-2013, 07:03 PM   #3
oach
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In the Flanders beer I just pitching the roeselare yeast and that is it. I believe that yeast is a combination of sacc, brett, and bugs? Assume, based on what you wrote, I should put it into secondary.

 
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Old 03-06-2013, 12:38 AM   #4
dannyhawkins
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If its just Roselare dump it in primary and then let it go about 1 month then rack to secondary and let it ride. You don't have a definite timeline, you can let it go without racking. If your worried about yeast dying and creating unpleasantries you can rack anytime between the time primary fermentation ends and the time the beer clears.
One month is a good idea to try, and all the good stuff you need will carry over with the beer and the yeast will stay behind. Hope that helps

Also the Roselare does have a sacc strain

 
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Old 03-06-2013, 01:32 AM   #5
eastoak
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you can leave it on the yeast with no problems, i do this routinely for a yr or more. sometimes i don't and it works fine too.

 
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Old 03-06-2013, 01:46 AM   #6
Calder
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I like to rack them as active fermentation is finishing. That way I leave a lot of the trub behind, but still carry over a lot of yeast to act as food for the Brett over the long haul.

Not racking seems to be acceptable too, but I have never done that.

 
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Old 03-07-2013, 03:51 PM   #7
microbusbrewery
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eastoak View Post
you can leave it on the yeast with no problems, i do this routinely for a yr or more. sometimes i don't and it works fine too.
+1, first Flanders Red spent a little over a year on Roeselare and no issues.
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Old 03-07-2013, 09:39 PM   #8
dmoore714
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I just did my first Flanders last weekend. Pitched some Us-05 along with my roesalare. Going to rack after 7 days and then let it sit for as long as I can stand to wait. I've read others had good results doing it this way.

Also read that you have to be careful with oxygen exposure, as oxygen + bugs produces acetic acid flavors in sour beers. If you primary in a bucket, they say to rack into a better bottle or glass carboy for the long secondary because they breathe less than buckets. Then you can control the oxygen exposure to your taste.

Then again... some people age in wood barrels which breathe a lot more than a bucket. So who knows.

 
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Old 03-07-2013, 11:03 PM   #9
oach
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Did you do a Flander red or brown? Do you mind sharing your recipe along with mash temps, etc?

 
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Old 03-13-2013, 09:43 AM   #10
dannyhawkins
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So this thread got me thinking and here is what I found when I referenced "Wild Brews"

I think it was page 181 and 182
Lambics are traditionally left on the cake and everything that entered in the coolship.

Flanders red and brown are fermented with saccro and transfered to barrels (red) where the resident bacteria take over (brown goes in stainless vats not wooden barrels)

So to answer your question after some actual research, you should dose with Roselare and rack to secondary after primary fermentation has subsided.



 
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