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Old 02-27-2013, 09:37 PM   #1
VampireSix
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I'm looking at brewing five different batches within the next month or two, and am looking at using the same liquid yeast strain for three of the batches, and another yeast strain for the other two batches.

I'm wondering if there is anything wrong with the following:

-Create a starter from the liquid pack/tube to take it up to about 300 billion cells.
-Split the slurry off into three separate storage containers (about 100 billion cells each).
-Create new starters from a slurry for each batch individually as needed, using a viability date from when the first starter was made.

Does this simple logic make sense, or am I missing/forgetting something?

Also, does making a starter make the final product a next/new generation yeast?

 
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Old 02-27-2013, 10:06 PM   #2
eastoak
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you can keep a strain going for a long time if you keep everything clean, some breweries have been using the same yeast for many yrs. each starter is a new generation, the yeast in the bottom of the fermentor is yet another generation.

 
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Old 02-27-2013, 10:44 PM   #3
diS
 
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If you plan to keep them for a while I'd suggest either to freeze or slant/plate them (in last scenario you want just few cells, but probably you don't want to do this for now). Leaving it for long time in fridge will have impact on viability and I would rather have less but healthy than old yeast with more cells.
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Old 02-28-2013, 06:26 AM   #4
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Harvest the yeast from one batch and use it on the next one. Lots of tutorials on how to do this, yeast doesn't like to sit in a fridge, contrary to lots of threads.
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Old 02-28-2013, 01:33 PM   #5
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VampireSix' approach is sound. splitting the yeast early reduces contamination risk. It should have no problems surviving the 2 month in the fridge.

Kai

 
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Old 02-28-2013, 03:30 PM   #6
VampireSix
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Thanks for the replies, all. Ideally, I'll have all of the batches at least started within a month.

Regarding freezing, from diS above, the book 'Yeast' mentions to avoid freezing yeast, as ice crystals will rupture the cell walls and provide nutrients for bacteria to grow.

How much of a concern is this, really?

 
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Old 02-28-2013, 04:02 PM   #7
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Sure, but for freezing you will use glycerine which acts as cryoprotectant.
I've done a lot of batches with frozen yeast without fermentation problems.
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Old 02-28-2013, 04:12 PM   #8
Xpertskir
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VampireSix View Post
I'm looking at brewing five different batches within the next month or two, and am looking at using the same liquid yeast strain for three of the batches, and another yeast strain for the other two batches.

I'm wondering if there is anything wrong with the following:

-Create a starter from the liquid pack/tube to take it up to about 300 billion cells.
-Split the slurry off into three separate storage containers (about 100 billion cells each).
-Create new starters from a slurry for each batch individually as needed, using a viability date from when the first starter was made.

Does this simple logic make sense, or am I missing/forgetting something?

Also, does making a starter make the final product a next/new generation yeast?
I do this exactly.


I am however careful to use a calculator to see how many viable cells I have when I do decide to step up my jar for a batch.


I prefer this to washing because I dryhop most of my beers in the primary so washing makes less sense, plus I generally find this easier.


You do end up spending more money on DME, but you would have that cost with frozen slants anyways.

BTW, I just grew up a jar that was in the fridge for 8 months with no issues.

 
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Old 02-28-2013, 04:34 PM   #9
PtreeCreekBrew
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I'd like to throw a wrench into this (I'll sanitize it first).

I want to continuously use the same yeast.

My thinking: 1 pack, 1L starter. Split off. Refrigerate/store one half, second starter for the second half to pitch.

Next batch: repeat. Essentially, I'd be starting with approx 100B cells each time, stepping up to 200B, dividing, and then going back up to 200B (or...whatever's needed) for the pitch. Obviously, I need to do the first step-up a couple of days prior to brewing...

Am I going to see long-term viability issues, or will I have enough new yeast in each generation to keep it fresh and healthy?

 
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Old 02-28-2013, 04:42 PM   #10
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the limiters of that approach are contamination that happens over time and possible drift of the yeast. But you can definitely go for this.

It's easier to keep starter sanitary than beer since you are working with a smaller volume, can sanitize by heat (which is more effective) and don't have as many transfers. The latter is assuming that you are using a flask.

based on that, this approach should lead to less accumulative contamination than reusing yeast from the primary.

Kai

 
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