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Old 02-24-2013, 02:59 PM   #1
geoffey
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Default British Ale Recipe Help

Looking for some feedback here on my first go at my own recipe. Not sure the exact style this fits into, but something close to an English Bitter with more spicyness. Would really appreciate any comments/feedback. The goal here was somewhat to use up some Brambling Cross hops I have sitting around.

Batch size: 5 Gal
Grainbill:
8lbs Marris Otter Pale Malt
.5lb Biscuit
.5lb Caramel 60L
.5lb Caramel 120L

Hops:
1oz Styrian Aurora 60min
.5oz Brambling Cross 30min
.5oz Brambling Cross 10min
1oz Brambling Cross 5min
1oz Brambling Cross Dry Hop

Yeast: Safbrew T-58
Estimated OG 1.049
Estimated FG 1.015
Calculated IBU's 39

Not sure of the Caramel 120 addition here, but was thinking it could be a good compliment to the black current undertones of the Brambling Cross. Using the same logic with regards to the yeast choice (which is one I've never used before).

Thanks!


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Old 02-24-2013, 04:16 PM   #2
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I would use a differnet yeast like o4 or even windsor unless you can get a liquid english/British strain. Although it could still be a good beer. Seems to me like an esb style, you got going on otherwise. Because of the MO you may not really need buiscuit but I still personally would use it. Ive only heard others say this about using them together "that its unnessasary"-so Im only going by that.
You could be a little heavy on the crystal malts since they are the darker type too but that could be a preference.


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Old 02-24-2013, 05:32 PM   #3
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Agree the johmohno here. Simplify the recipe. The biscuit is not necessary with the MO base although it certainly could stay. I'd reduce the 120L to 1/4 lb and also look for another yeast. The S-04 is a good British dry strain and both Wyeast and White Labs have a very nice variety of UK strains available. I'd also simplify the hop schedule to put it in line with with the traditional British two addition program, one for bittering (I'd suggest a 90 minute boil here) and one late, like 20-15 minutes from the end. Also consider bringing the IBUs down a bit to the typical ratio of 2/3 of the OG which would be ~32 here. You can always dry hop if you want an extra hit or aroma.
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Old 02-24-2013, 06:54 PM   #4
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Just curious why you guys suggest a dryer yeast. On the whole I prefer a more fruity/estery yeast.

Sounds like cutting back on the caramel 120 would be good, and adjusting the hop additions as suggested.
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Old 02-24-2013, 08:23 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geoffey View Post
Just curious why you guys suggest a dryer yeast. On the whole I prefer a more fruity/estery yeast.

Sounds like cutting back on the caramel 120 would be good, and adjusting the hop additions as suggested.

T-58 is a Belgian style yeast and is totally inappropriate for a British ale.
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Old 02-25-2013, 12:07 AM   #6
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Hmmm, wasn't thinking of T-58 as a Belgian Style. I'll take your advise here and perhaps go to Windsor for this one. This would probably be a good beer to split into two batches and pitch different yeasts. At some point I want to try that T-58 though, from what I read it sounds like something up my alley. I have a Belgian Wit on the calendar for later in the spring, maybe use it then...
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Old 02-25-2013, 12:56 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geoffey View Post
Hmmm, wasn't thinking of T-58 as a Belgian Style. I'll take your advise here and perhaps go to Windsor for this one. This would probably be a good beer to split into two batches and pitch different yeasts. At some point I want to try that T-58 though, from what I read it sounds like something up my alley. I have a Belgian Wit on the calendar for later in the spring, maybe use it then...
Its a belgian style dry. I didnt really like it in a pumpkin I made,well at least til a year later. I think most the dry strains are fairly subtle though. Its worth an experiment if you want to though. I think 04 is not very far from 05 also. Maybe because I havent used them at different temps though or something. I think the dry yeast strains are not extemely different. Pretty subtle mostly in my experience and pretty dry and clean as well. Alot of people seem to think windsor will produce a maltier beer,which from my short experience only using it in a few beers it attenuated as good as the rest of the yeasts. I did happen to like a pale ale I made with it more than other yeasts but could be other things as well. I think windsor is a good choice,but if you can splitt it its probably worth a learning experience.
If youve never used either then maybe Id wait for your belgian wit to use the t-58.


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