Aging in the keg or the secondary? - Home Brew Forums
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Old 02-22-2013, 12:46 PM   #1
j-pint
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Hello
I have a Belgian in the secondary and it finished out pretty fast. It's needs a week or two to rest before it will be drinkable. My question is it better to let it sit in the secondary or the keg? This will be my first beer kegged!
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Old 02-22-2013, 04:37 PM   #2
nachotime
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Keg. Get it chilled with a few pounds of co2


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Old 02-22-2013, 04:49 PM   #3
maida7
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keg

 
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Old 02-22-2013, 04:50 PM   #4
DPBISME
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I hate to disagree with my beer brewing colleague but I would let it stay at least three weeks since it is probably a higher gravity beer.

BUT

The only issue you will have is yeast in the first beer you pull if it is kegged to early; a lot of yeast if it is WAY TO EARLY.

If you have the book “How to brew like a Monk” you could use some of those times as a guideline.

Me? I no longer move beers to a Secondary when kegging.

Low Gravity beers: they stay in the fermenter at least two weeks and then are naturally carbonated in a keg for another two before serving. Hefewiesens and English Milds

High Gravity beers: they stay in the fermenter at least Four weeks and then are naturally carbonated and conditioned in the keg for up to 4 months before serving. (Aged IPA, Belgians) but can be consumed after eight (8) weeks but are better aged.


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Old 02-22-2013, 04:50 PM   #5
JeepDiver
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Keg with sugar, give it a couple of weeks to carb naturaly and age a bit

 
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Old 02-24-2013, 02:06 AM   #6
biohaz7331
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Is it better to age in the keg vs just letting it sit in a clearing vessel? My understanding was clearing vessel was for settling and keg was for chilling and carbing? Also then there would be less sediment in the bottom of the keg.

 
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Old 02-24-2013, 04:29 AM   #7
JeepDiver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biohaz7331 View Post
Is it better to age in the keg vs just letting it sit in a clearing vessel? My understanding was clearing vessel was for settling and keg was for chilling and carbing? Also then there would be less sediment in the bottom of the keg.
Any sediment in the keg will come out in the first pint so it is a none issue. It is really personal preference, but if I'm going to have a couple of extra weeks before the keg is ready I'm going to go ahead and carb it. Then a day in the fridge to cool down and it is ready to drink. I never have to fool with my regs and just keep all my kegs hooked up at the same pressure

 
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Old 02-24-2013, 01:27 PM   #8
biohaz7331
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So you carb at room temperature? Doesn't that require more time and pressure to get the same volume of co2?
True the sediment pours out, I am considering dry hoping my dead ringer IPA in the keg because wouldn't dry hoping in the keg give more hop aroma because the hops would be constantly in the beer.

 
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Old 02-24-2013, 01:46 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biohaz7331
So you carb at room temperature? Doesn't that require more time and pressure to get the same volume of co2?
It does require higher pressure; most of the calculators allow you to set your temperature to get the desired pressure. This doesn't "consume" more CO2. You are still carbing to the same volume of CO2. The equilibrium just happens at a higher pressure. As to time, I don't think the temperature makes much difference. The surface area exposed to gas is the major factor in the time to carb. Shaking or using a diffusing stone increase the surface area and speed the process.

 
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Old 02-24-2013, 02:24 PM   #10
JeepDiver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biohaz7331 View Post
So you carb at room temperature? Doesn't that require more time and pressure to get the same volume of co2?
True the sediment pours out, I am considering dry hoping my dead ringer IPA in the keg because wouldn't dry hoping in the keg give more hop aroma because the hops would be constantly in the beer.
I carb naturally at room (70ish) temp. Just boil a cup or so of water, and your sugar (usually half of what it takes for bottleing (so normally 2.5 oz, I let beersmith calculate for me). Dump into keg, rack on top , add co2 to seal and let sit 2-3 weeks. Put in fridge, for 24 hours, hook up gas (I usually purge first, not sure why, just do), pour out first 1/2 pint and drink up



 
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