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Old 02-23-2013, 08:00 AM   #11
SuckaMooHudda
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Wish there was a true and accurate mechanical test you could perform to show oxygen levels, etc.... I know when I had the flames on for 10 minutes everything was blue as could be the entire time. SO thats good, right? CO detectors are great and i do have one, but it is a digital device and i get nervous with them. PARANOIA AGAIN!!!


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Old 02-23-2013, 09:27 AM   #12
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SMH you need more than one CO detector, it can get in the walls. The inline fan is used to boost long duct runs, not for venting. You need a mushroom vent for that. Your set-up may work, but no tech can tell you it's safe. Safe would be a commercial stove instillation up to code. I'm not saying your system is bad or will not work, but it's not code. If you had a fire with the vent system running the house would burn in minutes, due to that fan and not having fire dampers (like fanning a camp fire). If you open only the farthest window to make a wind tunnel, that may help move the air. I like the install, who ever did it has some skills. Try it and let us know how it works. Also check your home owners insurance to see if this is covered. I've worked HVAC here in Chicago for 15 years.


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Old 02-23-2013, 03:00 PM   #13
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I actually have several CO detectors in the house 1 in the basement where I brew 1 in the kitchen just above the basement brewing area 1 additional on the first floor by the laundry room and office hall and all 3 bedrooms on the top floor have a combination fire and CO detector.
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Old 02-23-2013, 03:16 PM   #14
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I just ran/tested the burners just to boil some water for about 40 minutes and it vented like a mutha!!! We have snow here in Chicago and it melted a good 5 foot circle off of the house wall. The duct got very warm but not extremely hot. Obviously compared to the outside temp and snow it was very warm, thus the melting/dry area... the two windows on the same wall as the burners were sucking air in like crazy. everything seemed perfectly fine and the CO detector did not go off. I did open all four Windows. I don't know if it was necessary and it was COLD....but very tolerable. Sweatshirt, jeans and running shoes temp....
I decided to add a couple feet to the back of the hood and some flanges on the side as well just to collect as much vapor/air/(or whatever as I could, Juno to make it more like a funnel instead of a box
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Old 02-23-2013, 05:52 PM   #15
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I don't know much about HVAC but I do know that if you plumbed a cold air intake down to floor level behind the stand, you'd establish a decent local upflow that would affect the temperature of the rest of the basement a lot less than the window method.
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Old 02-23-2013, 06:13 PM   #16
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Ok, so no oppinions, just facts. I've been brewing in my basement with 32 tip natural gas burners, 150,000 btu for 3 years now. No dizziness, no headaches, no stomach cramps, and I'm obviously still alive. Plus, my carboxy hemoglobin is already elevated because I smoke tobacco, so I would be the first to experince side effects from CO poisoning (I know that because I'm an EH&S guy). I brew only when it's cold out (below 50 degrees F) and open two windows on either side of the basement. No vent hood. No CO detector. So basically, you're set up blows mine away and you're introducing less combustion gasses into said space. Draw your own conclusions. I hope you find a certified expert that puts your mind at ease. In the mean time, brew some beer while it's still cold outside.
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Old 02-23-2013, 06:25 PM   #17
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I am an hvac guy. licensed as a gas fitter in massachusetts.

I would buy a CO experts low level health monitor or an HVAC tool designed to take instantaneous readings of ambient air as low as 1 ppm. If you are consistently getting above 10ppm in the ambient air you need more combustion air and exhaust. (Co alarms go off at 70ppm you need to leave the house at 70 levels much lower than 70 will make you sick but the alarms won't go off).

Here is the real legal advice that I can give you:

No code will approve your set up and your burner manufacturer probably does not have them listed for indoor use. You are taking the liability both as far as fire and CO are concerned. Since you did the work yourself your homeowners policy might cover a loss. If you had hired a contractor to do this they would not.
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Old 02-23-2013, 07:24 PM   #18
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If you have to improve capture: Install side and rear flashing, all the way to the floor if need be. Lower the hood.

You may have to open only one window and close the rest. Cross currents are the achilles' heel of island style hoods, and can push all the CO2, CO, unburnt fuel, heat, and steam out from under the hood and into the room. However, cross currents can also work to your advantage by moving gas out of your basement window, or disadvantage by moving gas to your first floor. Commercially, all gasses must be captured by the hood. You could always perform a smoke test if you are worried about capture. Its pretty cool to visually see how well, or how poorly, a hood is exhausting. Just inform the neighbors first.
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Old 02-24-2013, 09:09 AM   #19
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An HVAC guy usually doesn't get involved with sizing up hoods. Companies that sell commercial kitchens size up hoods. The inline fan is probably rated at 435 CFM with no ductwork attached. The fan is used in Radon systems or as one person mentioned, a duct booster. The motor is inside of the housing, make sure it is moisture proof. The motor in an exhaust fan designed for a hood, isn't in the exhaust air. If your gas line is held to the perforated metal with cable ties, you might want to use clamps.
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Old 02-25-2013, 07:06 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VladOfTrub View Post
An HVAC guy usually doesn't get involved with sizing up hoods. Companies that sell commercial kitchens size up hoods. The inline fan is probably rated at 435 CFM with no ductwork attached. The fan is used in Radon systems or as one person mentioned, a duct booster. The motor is inside of the housing, make sure it is moisture proof. The motor in an exhaust fan designed for a hood, isn't in the exhaust air. If your gas line is held to the perforated metal with cable ties, you might want to use clamps.
A sincere Thanks!!!!... to all that have been posting on this thread. I have been able to take something away from every post. Hopefully it will continue to grow and we will all keep learning from it. I will do my best to keep everyone posted on how the system is running and if I run into any ventilation issues. I plan on running a batch this Saturday with my HVAC guy present. He stated he is more than confident enough to sit there the entire time while I brew. How can I argue with that?

**The fan was recommended by my local HBS as good for hot and humid conditions. I would never use cable ties to hold the gas pipe, it is actually four steel U clamps.


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