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Old 02-21-2013, 07:47 PM   #1
ArrowheadAles
 
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Does the temperature of the beer have an effect on dry hopping? I'm planning on a two week dry hop in a keg while the beer is carbing up in the kegerator.

If it's too cold to extract the aroma from the hops, how would I go about pressurizing the keg for dry hopping and leave it at room temperature?

Any thoughts?
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Old 02-21-2013, 08:01 PM   #2
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Dry hopping works best at room temperature. I tried it at both temperatures and found room temperature produced much better results. When I dry hop in a keg I pressurize the keg to the normal serving pressure and keep it at room temperature until its done dry hopping. Then I drop the temperature to level for proper carbonation and wait until it is done. It takes longer but it is worth it.

 
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Old 02-21-2013, 08:07 PM   #3
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i don't know if i'd go as far to say it works better at warmer temps but it def works faster

i almost exclusively dry hop in the keg now at serving temps and haven't noticed any loss of aroma

i place my hops in a hop sack and place it at the bottom of the keg and rack the beer on top (usually around 34 from cold crashing) then seal the keg and set it at serving pressure

it usually takes a week+ to notice the extra aroma but it def lasts longer without the detrimental effects of leaving dry hops in for too long at room temp

i leave it on the hops until the keg is floated - sometimes weeks, sometimes months

 
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Old 02-21-2013, 08:15 PM   #4
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Temperature does play a role in "hopping" a beer. I found this article very informative when researching this question a while back.

http://beersmith.com/blog/2013/01/21...rewing+Blog%29

 
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Old 02-21-2013, 08:30 PM   #5
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I dryhop in the keg all the time. It takes a bit longer for peak flavor/aroma to develop at fridge temps, compared to room temperature dryhopping, but it seems like it ends up about the same.
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Old 02-21-2013, 08:38 PM   #6
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You could prime with priming sugar like you would bottling (be sure to use less priming sugar-about half) and dry hop at room temperature at the same time.

 
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Old 02-22-2013, 07:17 PM   #7
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How many ounces of sugar for 5 gallons of ipa in a keg? And when you purge the head space what pressure do you leave in the keg while it carbs up? I would think not much due to the fact it will build pressure while carbing.
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Old 02-22-2013, 08:18 PM   #8
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Opinions vary on how much sugar to use, but I almost always go with the weight that is recommended if you were bottling a batch. One of the theories are that there is less total headspace in a single full keg than in a combined 48-50 bottles, so it takes less total CO2 to achieve the same pressure. So calculate how much sugar you would need if bottling, then divide by two and you’ll have enough to carb up a full keg. Heres a good calculator for carb volumes at specific temps for varying styles of beer:
http://hbd.org/cgi-bin/recipator/rec...rbonation.html

And here’s a good thread to read about keg priming. Theres some off topic stuff in there about whether the bubbles are better in naturally vs force carbed, but it’s a good read:

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/how-...ar-keg-105601/

 
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Old 02-24-2013, 02:02 AM   #9
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Is there much of an advantage in dry hopping in the keg vs a clearing vessel? It just seems more work to clean out of a keg vs a carboy but maybe I am wrong.

 
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Old 02-24-2013, 02:07 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by biohaz7331 View Post
Is there much of an advantage in dry hopping in the keg vs a clearing vessel? It just seems more work to clean out of a keg vs a carboy but maybe I am wrong.
I use hops bags (the tightly woven ones) for pellet hops, as well as leaf hops, and a I have a "teaball" strainer that also works for leaf hops. It's not bad at all, if you keep them contained. If you don't, they will clog the diptube for sure!

I don't tend to use a carboy, so I either dryhop in the primary, or in the keg, or both.
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