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Old 02-21-2013, 08:56 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by Jayhem View Post

Could you bring your kettle indoors just for the mash?
I had the same problem and that's what I did. Set the burner close enough to the side door that I felt I could safely get the pot inside once I hit my strike temp. Much easier to hold the temp out of the wind and cold!
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Old 02-21-2013, 11:59 PM   #12
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That's really not a bad idea for cold weather! Although, I try to do as little work as possible , and bringing a hot kettle with almost 8 gals + grain inside does pose a little more chance of a spill. After the boil I bring it in, but at that time it's just under 6 gals and the grain and perforated bucket are out. But I appreciate the suggestions!
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Old 02-22-2013, 12:51 AM   #13
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Mash temperature and its effect on fermentability is certainly a possibility. Another thing that can increase fermentability is low mash pH. And a final component that can enhance the dryness of finish is high sulfate in water. Plenty of options to explore. Hopefully you know what is in your water.
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Old 02-22-2013, 07:50 PM   #14
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Thanks Martin, I am using RO water with 1 tsp of gypsum, and 1 tsp of calcium chloride. In addition I add 1/2 tsp of lactic acid. I'll check out your water link!
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Old 02-22-2013, 08:33 PM   #15
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I heat my strike water on the stove and mash inside, then do my batch sparge indoors as well. Then I take both parts out to the patio and combine them to boil, that way I'm never moving a full kettle of hot liquid/mash.

Also, remember a longer mash=more fermentable wort especially at lower temps. Consider mashing until you get full conversion and then sparging.
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Old 02-23-2013, 12:43 AM   #16
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The RO gives you a known starting point. I wish I had confidence in measuring powdered mineral additions with teaspoons, but I don't. So, I'm not sure what those mineral additions produce in terms of concentrations. My caution is that you don't want high chloride in conjunction with high sulfate. Taste can be minerally when both are in excess.
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Old 02-26-2013, 12:09 AM   #17
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While I was looking at my clone recipe, I did notice that I ignored the yeast suggestion and used US-05. The recipe calls for Wyeast 1968, which has an attenuation of 67-71%. This is even in the description: " Attenuation levels are typically less than most other yeast strains which results in a slightly sweeter finish." I'm not sure what the typical attenuation is for US-05. I'm planning to brew this again next weekend. I was going to enter a small contest with this on Mar 24. I'll increase my mash temps, make sure the mash time is no longer than 60 mins, and I'll use 1968 or maybe 1332 instead of US-05. I'll let you know how it turns out!

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Old 02-26-2013, 03:26 AM   #18
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Mash for a shorter time. I see you're at 70 and 80 minutes. Try mashing for just 30 or 40 minutes.

 
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Old 02-26-2013, 03:30 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TastySalmon View Post
Mash for a shorter time. I see you're at 70 and 80 minutes. Try mashing for just 30 or 40 minutes.
I have to totally disagree with that, if youre mashing at under 150 degrees. A mash may convert in as little as 20 minutes, but usually only at a higher temperature. If you're mashing at 147-147 degrees, it could take as long as 90 minutes to convert. If you're not testing for conversion, I would NOT shorten the mash.
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Old 02-26-2013, 03:35 AM   #20
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Quote:
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I have to totally disagree with that, if youre mashing at under 150 degrees. A mash may convert in as little as 20 minutes, but usually only at a higher temperature. If you're mashing at 147-147 degrees, it could take as long as 90 minutes to convert. If you're not testing for conversion, I would NOT shorten the mash.
I agree. I mash for 2-8 hours and get incredible attenuation due to combo of temps dropping and extended time frames. I've had to increase my temps by 3+ degrees depending on style. It's the mash temp PLUS mash time
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