What does what? - Home Brew Forums
Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > What does what?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 02-15-2013, 02:49 AM   #1
Enf0rc3r
Recipes 
 
Jan 2013
Posts: 88
Liked 8 Times on 5 Posts



Are there any resources to easily find substitutes when converting recipes? I don't have the ability to go all grain and I enjoyed my first partial mash. Rather than posting or asking everytime I need a recipe converted, is there someplace I can immediately look and see what my subs would be?



 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2013, 03:00 AM   #2
Conan
Recipes 
 
Apr 2008
Cheektowaga, NY
Posts: 737
Liked 37 Times on 35 Posts


While it seems like you want an online resource, brewing programs such as BeerSmith ($20, and a huge benefit to all aspects of brewing) will convert back and forth with about 3 clicks. Google didn't bring up many direct answers but there are apparently some spreadsheets floating around that could help. Kyle



 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2013, 03:33 AM   #3
BobC
Recipes 
 
Jan 2012
Anchorage, Alaska
Posts: 269
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts


I can profide a hop chart.

http://www.hopunion.com/17_HopVarieties.cfm
__________________
Primary 1 - Smash 1
Primary 2 - Smash 2
Primary 3 - Belgium Triple
Bottled - Oatmeal Stout, ESB, Belgium Light.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-15-2013, 03:43 AM   #4

When I was doing partial mashes, I would mash the specialty grains along with ~2 pounds of the base malt. I would then convert the remaining base malt to DME (light or extra-light). 1 lb of base malt = ~0.6 lbs DME (or ~0.75 lbs LME).

Is this what you mean?
__________________
My Hombrewing Blog

My Beer Cellar

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2013, 01:24 PM   #5
Enf0rc3r
Recipes 
 
Jan 2013
Posts: 88
Liked 8 Times on 5 Posts


Take the honey orange wheat recipe in this site. He has all grain, partial, and extract recipe versions. How do you calculate from all grain?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2013, 01:34 PM   #6
alane1
Recipes 
 
Jun 2012
South East Massachusetts
Posts: 899
Liked 251 Times on 167 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by Enf0rc3r View Post
Take the honey orange wheat recipe in this site. He has all grain, partial, and extract recipe versions. How do you calculate from all grain?
Hitting original and final gravity is whats important, most all-grain recipes include specialty grains.Start with a pale extract and use specialty grains until you hit o.g and .f.g with a online calculator like this one:http://www.tastybrew.com/calculators/recipe.html

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2013, 04:26 PM   #7

Quote:
Originally Posted by Enf0rc3r
Take the honey orange wheat recipe in this site. He has all grain, partial, and extract recipe versions. How do you calculate from all grain?
It depends on how much grain you can mash with your partial mash setup. Start with the specialty grains and then the base malt up to the max pounds of grain you can mash. Then convert any remaining base malt to extract (~0.6 lbs of DME per lb of malt or ~0.75 lbs of LME per lb of malt)

Just make sure the total amount of specialty malts do not outweigh the total amour of base malt in your mash. If it does, you should probably pull out some of the specialty malt and steep it as you would when doing an extract batch.

Simple example:
7 lbs pale ale malt
1 lb crystal 40
0.5 lbs wheat malt

For my partial mash setup I can mash 4 lbs of grain, so into my mash goes:
1 lb crystal 40
0.5 lbs wheat malt
2.5 lbs of pale ale malt

I then convert the remaining 4.5 lbs of pale ale malt to 2.7 lbs of extra-light DME.
__________________
My Hombrewing Blog

My Beer Cellar

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2013, 09:22 PM   #8
Enf0rc3r
Recipes 
 
Jan 2013
Posts: 88
Liked 8 Times on 5 Posts


Ah I see now. Thanks for the help. I appreciate it.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-16-2013, 09:28 PM   #9
Chipman
Recipes 
 
Feb 2010
Jackson, WY
Posts: 166
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts


Best way is to learn the math behind the programs. Then tweak to your system. There are stats for LME and DME fermentability etc.


__________________
Remember, 'cold' is a flavor

Cooking with beer? Been doing it for years.
Add it to the food? I'll have to try it sometime.

He who has tasted sailing will walk the earth with his head turned into the wind.

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools



Forum Jump