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Old 02-12-2013, 02:17 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhelanKA7 View Post
Airlocks are trash. That is my story and I am sticking to it.
Not true, they are great for secondary racking, wine, and cider.

Primary fermenting I use a blowoff tube.

 
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Old 02-12-2013, 02:18 PM   #12
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Temps higher than 74?

Probably want to get that down a little bit dependent on the yeast strain that you are using as internal temp of fermentation is often higher than indicated temp on outside of ferment vessel. So if outside reads 74 degrees than you can make a solid bet that internal ferment temps are around 80 or higher.
Again depending on yeast strain you might get some off flavors (esters)

Given that a good majority of the fermenting is done, it could possibly be too late BUT still beer when it is all done and drinkable for sure.
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Old 02-12-2013, 02:20 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhelanKA7 View Post
Airlocks are trash. That is my story and I am sticking to it.
I have dozens and dozens of trash then! Like I said, I've needed a blow off tube ONE time in 13 years in beermaking, and never in winemaking (25+ years). I think technique and temperature are the important things.
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Old 02-12-2013, 02:22 PM   #14
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I had the same thing happen with my porter last week while using an airlock. OG was 1.061 and temp was 67. The blow-off tube is a nice way to solve the excessive pressure problem.
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Old 02-12-2013, 08:38 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yooper View Post
I have dozens and dozens of trash then! Like I said, I've needed a blow off tube ONE time in 13 years in beermaking, and never in winemaking (25+ years). I think technique and temperature are the important things.
When you are in the business I am you become accustomed to minimizing risk

Plus a blowoff tube is fewer parts and cheaper. I don't see any benefit to using an airlock and a major negative, that being the propensity to bottleneck your vent and create a nasty mess in the process.

 
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Old 02-13-2013, 03:03 AM   #16
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When I got home the internal temp was 75. The yeast ideal temp is up to 70 so I rigged up a swamp cooler to try to cool it off. Hopefully my version of a swamp cooler will work. I need to find a better permanent solution but space is pretty tight in an apartment. Any suggestions? I doubt my way would even work during a Florida summer, even if I am in north Florida. Luckily my wife likes good beer too, so she's a little more forgiving about having a cooler with water and towels sitting around. After all this I just hope I end up with something drinkable at the end.

I was kinda panicked this morning when I saw the spray all over everything. Kinda felt like carrying a bomb to the bathtub to release the pressure. In the future I'll be using the blowoff tube. With this just my second batch, I didn't realize it was even possible to need one. Appreciate everyone's advice.

 
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Old 02-13-2013, 12:46 PM   #17
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I find a blowoff tube is really only necessary for "bigger" beers (higher O.G.). With normal-gravity beers, a plain old airlock is sufficient. The key is controlling fermentation temperature. If you ferment in a room with ambient temperature of 60-65, you'll get a nice, controlled fermentation and no blowoff tube is necessary.

I'm afraid this batch will almost certainly have some harsh fusel alcohol flavours (which do not go away with age), but it may still be drinkable, and it's worth seeing it through to completion so next time, you'll know what can happen if you ferment too hot.

 
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Old 02-13-2013, 12:52 PM   #18
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Given 3-7 days after FG to clean up & settle out,the yeast will eat those off flavor inducing compounds if there isn't too much of them. I had a strange one this morning with my airlock on the brew I did yesterday. I filled it with cheap vodka last evening,& it's kinda yellowish this morning. I guess it had a good belch or two?
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Old 02-13-2013, 01:47 PM   #19
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I am on my 3rd beer (2nd AG) and I had to use a blow off tube for all of them. I think my plate chiller cooled my wort down too far this round and 12 hours after pitching my temps were in the low 60s. So I used a brew belt for about 2 hours and got the temp to ~66. After 24 hours the temps were around 69-70... turned the heat off in my apartment last night, and they dropped to ~68 this morning.

Hoping SWMBO does not notice the apartment being in the low 60s....

 
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Old 02-13-2013, 04:24 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhelanKA7 View Post
Plus a blowoff tube is fewer parts and cheaper.
Air lock at LHBS: $1

4' of tubing at LHBS: $4

10' of tubing at Home Depot (just for non-LHBS pricing): $5


So, no, a blow-off tube isn't necessarily cheaper.

 
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