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Old 02-11-2013, 04:09 AM   #1
chri5
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The local brew pub (SLO Brew) has their IPA available both regular, and on nitrogen. I've really been digging the version on nitro even though I'm not a huge fan of it served normally.

Does anybody else have a beer they only like on nitro?

 
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Old 02-11-2013, 05:14 AM   #2
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Cascade Lakes in Bend Oregon had their Cyclops (I think it was Cyclops) IPA on both traditional and nitro. The nitro was way smoother and more drinkable. Fo rthe mostpart though I prefer stouts on nitro ans the style better lends itself to nitro. Left hand Brewing in colorado even has a milk stout on nitro in bottles. I highly recommend it.
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Old 02-11-2013, 06:29 PM   #3
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I'm not a big fan of big American IPA's on nitro, or cask especially, although Pizza Port occasionally makes a delicious pale ale called Foamball that's delicious. Only served on nitro.
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Old 02-11-2013, 08:42 PM   #4
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And I'm just the opposite. I really enjoy IPA on nitro. I think it tastes and feels like I'm at a pub in england, only hoppier! When I have a nitro system i will be brewing IPA and stout exclusively.

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Old 02-11-2013, 09:02 PM   #5
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On a recent trip to Colo Springs i had Compass IPA on nitro

http://www.bristolbrewing.com/our_beers.asp?brs_id=3

Darn good beer and the nitro gave it the sort of creaminess that i typically associate with a stout. Cant say i ever had more than one or two other IPAs on nitro, but this is the only one i can recall at the moment.

 
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Old 02-11-2013, 09:38 PM   #6
chri5
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The interesting thing to me is how the nitro changes the taste of the bittering hops. It really gives it a mellow bitterness.

There was a beer bar I used to go to (Bittercreek Alehouse) that usually had an IPA available in cask. It had a similar feel, yet was obviously served warm. That was a nice way to serve too.

 
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Old 02-11-2013, 11:33 PM   #7
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From what I understand nitrogen doesnt actually carb the beer, and most places serve with beergas (75/25 nitro/co2). Nitro is just a way to push beer through lines at a higher PSI without overcarbing the beer. The nitrogen doesnt actually touch 90% of the beer. Is there an explanation to why beers pushed with nitro would taste different? I've never understood this phenomenon, so if someone could shed some light on this I'd really appreciate it.

To answer the question, I enjoy stouts and porters pushed by nitro, mainly because the're coming out of a stout tap at a high psi which gives them a nice thick creamy head.
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Old 02-11-2013, 11:40 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by techbrewie View Post
From what I understand nitrogen doesnt actually carb the beer, and most places serve with beergas (75/25 nitro/co2). Nitro is just a way to push beer through lines at a higher PSI without overcarbing the beer. The nitrogen doesnt actually touch 90% of the beer. Is there an explanation to why beers pushed with nitro would taste different? I've never understood this phenomenon, so if someone could shed some light on this I'd really appreciate it.

To answer the question, I enjoy stouts and porters pushed by nitro, mainly because the're coming out of a stout tap at a high psi which gives them a nice thick creamy head.
I would say (this is just my opinion) that going through a nitro tap would "aerate" the beer more giving it a smoother mouthfeel.
Normally a nitro beer is lower carb'd (1.2 volumes vs. 2..3ish - roughly), this would mean less carbonic acid bite to the beer, and a possible reasoning for chri5's "mellower bitterness".

 
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Old 02-11-2013, 11:45 PM   #9
chri5
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I'm sure it is because of the mouthfeel. Regular beers seem more "crisp" to me. I think that's the best way to describe it.

 
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Old 02-11-2013, 11:56 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by techbrewie View Post
From what I understand nitrogen doesnt actually carb the beer, and most places serve with beergas (75/25 nitro/co2). Nitro is just a way to push beer through lines at a higher PSI without overcarbing the beer. The nitrogen doesnt actually touch 90% of the beer. Is there an explanation to why beers pushed with nitro would taste different? I've never understood this phenomenon, so if someone could shed some light on this I'd really appreciate it.

To answer the question, I enjoy stouts and porters pushed by nitro, mainly because the're coming out of a stout tap at a high psi which gives them a nice thick creamy head.
Nitrogen can be dissolved in beer, although it's a pain in the ass and likes to break out much more easily than CO2. The bubbles that nitrogen forms when going from a dissolved gas to a free gas are much smaller and finer than those that CO2 forms, and that really changes the mouthfeel of the beer.

 
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