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Old 02-06-2013, 01:29 AM   #1
mrrshotshot
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Default How to get Motor Oil black color.

Hey all. Im trying to figure out how to get that super dark, motor oil black color in my imperial stout. Think Sierra Nevada Narwhal, Firestone Walker Parabola, etc.

Parabola hovers in the 160 SRM range. I'm trying to figure out how I can get this without getting crazy astringent flavors from excessive dark malts.

Here is my current recipe for my Imperial Stout:

Imperial Stout (11 gallon)
Maris Otter (23 lbs)
Roasted Barley (2 lbs)
Crystal 120 (2 lbs)
Black Barley (1 lb)
Chocolate Malt (1 lb)
White Wheat (1 lb)
Dark Extract (10 lbs)

Since I only care about the color right now I wont divulge anymore information unless you think it's necessary.

Beer Tools Pro calculates this out to a 38 SRM which isnt quite that cant-see-any-light-through-it dark color that I'm looking for. Suggestions?

Thanks.


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Old 02-06-2013, 01:32 AM   #2
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toss some carafa III in?


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Old 02-06-2013, 01:39 AM   #3
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You need grain that adds darkness without adding bitterness. Debittered Belgian Black malt is ultimate in my experience, but also MoreBeer has a new malt called Black Prinz that is supposed to also be very good. I have some, but haven't used it yet.
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Old 02-06-2013, 01:49 AM   #4
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Maybe sub in some black wheat in place of the white? http://www.ritebrew.com/product-p/806862.htm
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Old 02-06-2013, 01:56 AM   #5
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I think Briess also has a black wheat that isn't supposed to add any roasted flavor. Maybe replace the white wheat with that?
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Old 02-06-2013, 01:59 AM   #6
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Yep, midnight wheat or chocolate wheat will work. I've also had good success with adding a good portion of dark grains at the end of the mash. You get the color and not all the roasted flavor.
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Old 02-06-2013, 02:06 AM   #7
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Old 02-06-2013, 02:32 AM   #8
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Midnight wheat is great.
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Old 02-06-2013, 02:36 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WesleyS View Post
Yep, midnight wheat or chocolate wheat will work. I've also had good success with adding a good portion of dark grains at the end of the mash. You get the color and not all the roasted flavor.
A good idea for those dark grains is to use what you need in the mash too hit your necessary pH then cold steep the rest. This extracts color and flavor but little harshness. There is no or very little fermentables in dark roasted grains.
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Old 02-06-2013, 02:46 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bottlebomber View Post
You need grain that adds darkness without adding bitterness. Debittered Belgian Black malt is ultimate in my experience, but also MoreBeer has a new malt called Black Prinz that is supposed to also be very good. I have some, but haven't used it yet.
Black prinz is great. I've used it a few times for color. It's a little darker than caraffa III and there is a touch of roast, but no astringent flavors.


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