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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Recipes/Ingredients > BYO Belgian IPA recipe - notes 2 yeast
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Old 02-05-2013, 11:32 PM   #1
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Default BYO Belgian IPA recipe - notes 2 yeast

Hey guys,
I am looking to make a Belgian IPA next week and I want to follow the Belgian IPA recipe that was posted on page #41 on BYO in the October 2012 issue. In the ingredients it list both US-05 and WLP500. Why does it list both? Pitch both at the same time? It does not include an "or". I have WLP530 already washed, so I'm going to use that regardless. The recipes O.G. for the recipe is 1.064


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Old 02-05-2013, 11:43 PM   #2
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Read the article. Specifically under the subtitle "Why Not A Belgian Twist?"
It's explained.


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Old 02-06-2013, 02:32 AM   #3
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Wesley - Thanks for the heads up. Read the article a while ago and forgot that I read that before.

Two questions after re-reading the passage #1) It mentions I need soft water and per his test 35 to 45 IBU's. For the soft water part, I usually get RO water from a Glacier machine and add 1 tsp of Gypsum and 1 tsp of Calcium Chloride. Will that take care of the water for a Belgium? I tried plugging it into EZ Water Calculator and it seems to be fine pH-wise. Also, 35 to 45 IBU's is more of a pale ale to me, should I keep it around that and just dry hop 3-4 ounces to boost it full of aroma since it will have to age for a while. Which leads me to #2) When dry hopping in two stages, as the author and Bob Peak recommend, should I remove the first hops that have dry hopped for 1 week already or leave them in the beer as I dry hop the 2nd hop?

Very excited to try this. New to Belgium's and I am a huge fan of IPAs. My first Belgium is still aging, at 3 months now and will be bottling to begin a 2-3 month bottle age in the next 3-4 weeks.
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Old 02-06-2013, 04:57 AM   #4
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I was wondering if either of you could inform me about the article a little but more. I don't have access to it, but I have a Belgian ipa in my fermenter and I used wyeast Ardennes in it. I was just wondering why they said to stray away from Belgian yeast strains. I've sampled it a few times after gravity readings, but it was pretty tasty. I did notice that it was less hoppy than I was expecting. Any info would be greatly appreciated.
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Old 02-06-2013, 05:08 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bassaholic View Post
I was wondering if either of you could inform me about the article a little but more. I don't have access to it, but I have a Belgian ipa in my fermenter and I used wyeast Ardennes in it. I was just wondering why they said to stray away from Belgian yeast strains. I've sampled it a few times after gravity readings, but it was pretty tasty. I did notice that it was less hoppy than I was expecting. Any info would be greatly appreciated.
It would be hard to make a "Belgian IPA" without a Belgian yeast, IMO. If it's not hoppy enough, add more hops.
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Old 02-06-2013, 05:16 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by highgravitybacon

It would be hard to make a "Belgian IPA" without a Belgian yeast, IMO. If it's not hoppy enough, add more hops.
That's exactly what I was thinking. My understanding of the style was an IPA fermented with a Belgian strain of yeast. The hops were apparent, but the yeast flavors were just a bit stronger. I have it dry hopping now so that should take care of that issue.
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Old 02-06-2013, 01:09 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bassaholic View Post
I was wondering if either of you could inform me about the article a little but more. I don't have access to it, but I have a Belgian ipa in my fermenter and I used wyeast Ardennes in it. I was just wondering why they said to stray away from Belgian yeast strains. I've sampled it a few times after gravity readings, but it was pretty tasty. I did notice that it was less hoppy than I was expecting. Any info would be greatly appreciated.
Bassaholic - Sorry if you misread my posting, but I never mentioned anything about "stay(ing) away from Belgian yest strains". The ingredients listing list both US-05 and WLP500 (or any Belgian yeast depending on the Belgian style, in my opinion). The reason the author says to use the two strains are as follows. The author "added a neutral ale yeast after cooling the wort followed by a Belgian strain as soon as the fermentation was active" This is because "the Belgian tradition is generally a necessary background to the fruity yeast used". Obviously. He really doesn't go to far into the reason for the nuetral yeast though. I believe he wants it there to add some of the IPA yeast flavors to the beer as well. I am going to try both and see how it goes. How long are you planning on aging in primary and bottle conditioning your BIPA?
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Old 02-06-2013, 03:30 PM   #8
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No worries, I was just a little confused, but I guess that technique would make sense. I would think it might result in a drier beer tho. I was planning on trying one after two weeks in the bottle and see how it's progressed. I noticed a huge difference in flavor between my two gravity readings and it already tastes quite good flat and warm. I have a feeling that aging it too long will diminish the hop flavor, but ill probably just keep sampling them along the way and keep a sixer in the closet for a while.


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