Fermentation - Home Brew Forums
Register Now For Free!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > Fermentation

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 02-02-2013, 06:19 AM   #1
jock
Recipes 
 
Feb 2013
Posts: 4


Brewing my first Ale.
Should there be a head/froth during fermentation?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2013, 06:58 AM   #2
GilSwillBasementBrews
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
GilSwillBasementBrews's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jul 2012
Eagleville, Pennsylvania
Posts: 2,738
Liked 274 Times on 227 Posts


Yes during fermentation the wort will develop a thick foamy krausen layer. Totally normal. It can take up to 72hrs to see visible signs so if you haven't seen anything yet just give it time.
__________________
Beer Plus Science = .....Good!!!!! By: Adam Savage

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2013, 07:04 AM   #3
HoppyDaze
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
HoppyDaze's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Dec 2008
Wilsonville, OR
Posts: 12,496
Liked 2459 Times on 1715 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by jock
Brewing my first Ale.
Should there be a head/froth during fermentation?
Yes! Successful fermentation! Let is sit for three weeks where it is.
__________________
"Dad, Bob broke your beer!"

*Member: The HBT Sweaty Fat Guys Cigar club

Advice for posting

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2013, 12:10 PM   #4
jock
Recipes 
 
Feb 2013
Posts: 4

Thanks! Is the fermentation process longer than a lager?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2013, 01:08 PM   #5
RM-MN
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Recipes 
 
Nov 2010
Solway, MN
Posts: 9,791
Liked 1771 Times on 1407 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by jock View Post
Thanks! Is the fermentation process longer than a lager?
Because the ales ferment at higher temperatures than lagers the fermentation process is much shorter. If the ferment is started warm and has no control of the temperature the active part can happen in 24 to 36 hours. We usually recommend 2 to 3 weeks in the fermenter because the active part of the ferment isn't the end of it.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2013, 12:20 PM   #6
jock
Recipes 
 
Feb 2013
Posts: 4

Do you leave it for 2-3 weeks and the bottle it and leave that as well? Is it bad the leave it in the fermenter for too long?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-2013, 12:45 PM   #7
RM-MN
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Recipes 
 
Nov 2010
Solway, MN
Posts: 9,791
Liked 1771 Times on 1407 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by jock View Post
Do you leave it for 2-3 weeks and the bottle it and leave that as well? Is it bad the leave it in the fermenter for too long?
I leave mine (on average) three weeks in the primary fermenter and then bottle. Then it stays in the bottle for a period of time to carbonate and mature. That time to mature varies with the beer with the higher alcohol beers taking longer and the darker beers taking longer and the ones with higher alcohol and darker taking the longest. I might enjoy a wheat beer (low alcohol and light in color) in a couple weeks but I know that the stout won't be really good for a couple of months or possibly even 3.

Yes it is bad to leave it in the fermenter too long as your yeast can autolyze and give you some really horrible flavors. It just hasn't been fully determined how long is too long. I've left a brown ale for 9 weeks and it came out really good. Another poster reported leaving a beer for 8 months without the bad flavors. You won't have much to worry about in one month.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2013, 12:39 AM   #8
jock
Recipes 
 
Feb 2013
Posts: 4

Quote:
Originally Posted by RM-MN View Post
I leave mine (on average) three weeks in the primary fermenter and then bottle. Then it stays in the bottle for a period of time to carbonate and mature. That time to mature varies with the beer with the higher alcohol beers taking longer and the darker beers taking longer and the ones with higher alcohol and darker taking the longest. I might enjoy a wheat beer (low alcohol and light in color) in a couple weeks but I know that the stout won't be really good for a couple of months or possibly even 3.

Yes it is bad to leave it in the fermenter too long as your yeast can autolyze and give you some really horrible flavors. It just hasn't been fully determined how long is too long. I've left a brown ale for 9 weeks and it came out really good. Another poster reported leaving a beer for 8 months without the bad flavors. You won't have much to worry about in one month.
I am using only a basic starter brewing kit with a plastic 25L fermenter and basic ingredients : Coopers Real Ale, Sugar and Yeast. Does it still matter how long i leave it? will my ale still taste better the longer i leave it?

Also as a young beer enthusiast (18yo) i was wondering if there were some tips to make different and better tasting beers? i am a uni student so i am trying to still be as cheap as possible.

Thank you

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2013, 01:00 AM   #9
RM-MN
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Recipes 
 
Nov 2010
Solway, MN
Posts: 9,791
Liked 1771 Times on 1407 Posts


When yeast consumes the malt sugars it does more than excrete ethanol and CO2. It creates a whole host of other compounds, some are intermediate as the sugars are broken down and will later be turned into ethanol, some will hang around as off flavors, like banana or cloves or even higher alcohols. Given time on the yeast cake that forms at the bottom of your fermenter, a lot of these compounds will be consumed by the yeast and broken down to more alcohol or something inoffensive. You can do a couple of things to reduce these compounds. Pitch the appropriate amount of yeast. To much or not enough will cause stresses on the yeast. The major one for me is temperature control. I find I don't get much off flavors if I start with cool wort, pretty close to the low end of the yeast's preferred range. It doesn't seem to hurt to chill the wort a little below that and let it warm up slowly.

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Slow fermentation onset, then blowoff, then stuck fermentation onthedot Fermentation & Yeast 3 02-09-2013 02:46 AM
Lost too much yeast during fermentation? Stuck Fermentation, should i water down? aorloski Fermentation & Yeast 8 11-11-2012 01:45 AM
fermentation temp control after initial fermentation scottab Fermentation & Yeast 1 06-04-2012 04:24 PM
One step fermentation or two steps fermentation, that depend on? darkmastiff Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 6 06-30-2011 07:13 PM
Which is better? A fast, very active fermentation, or a slow steady fermentation? cerberus9 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 6 09-24-2009 04:56 PM


Forum Jump