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Old 02-01-2013, 03:59 PM   #1
nilo
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Default Storing Wort

I was thinking on splitting my brew sections by mashing my grains and storing the wort in 34F in a keg with CO2, then continue the brewing some time later, days, weeks?
I'm assuming proper sanitation and low temps will keep bad yeast/bacteria under check.
Anything bad with this plan?


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Old 02-01-2013, 04:26 PM   #2
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I cant see anytging wrong with it. Basically the same as making homemade soda, not adding any potassium sorbate and just storing that. I think that brewing one day and storing it should be ok, the only problem that I am seeing is that although you will be chilling it after mashing, it still might catch something. Also, there is still a good chance of there being separation between the water and the sugar.


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Old 02-01-2013, 05:29 PM   #3
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It should be ok.

I usually break up my brewing into two days. I steep grains on the first day. Then I put the lid on the pot and wrap the top with saran wrap. A day or two later, I continue as usual.

E
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Old 02-01-2013, 05:37 PM   #4
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Ehhh.... I wouldn't store it for too long.

As homebrewers, we don't achieve perfect sterilization, and instead depend on massive out-competition by yeast (in freshly-pitched wort) or a naturally-hostile alcoholic environment (in finished beer) to keep what bugs we miss in check.

Neither of these checks on infection are present in fresh, un-pitched wort, so, while I know plenty of people have made great beers chilling their wort overnight and whatnot, I'd be leery of going more than a couple days before pitching.
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Old 02-01-2013, 05:38 PM   #5
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Note that I will be boiling the wort when brewing resumes, so bad bugs that may be around, defying the close to freezing temps, will be killed.
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Old 02-01-2013, 05:40 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nilo View Post
Note that I will be boiling the wort when brewing resumes, so bad bugs that may be around, defying the close to freezing temps, will be killed.
I don't see a big issue with this idea except that if by chance a bug does get in the damage may be done even before fermentation begins. That being said take extra care in sanitization procedures and quickly getting the wort down to storeable temperatures.
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Old 02-01-2013, 05:50 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nightshade View Post
I don't see a big issue with this idea except that if by chance a bug does get in the damage may be done even before fermentation begins. That being said take extra care in sanitization procedures and quickly getting the wort down to storeable temperatures.
Perhaps using the wort chiller to bring it from 150 to like 45F before moving to the keg? I could do that.
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Old 02-02-2013, 04:39 AM   #8
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An update after brewing it this evening.
Honestly, it doesn't worth it!
All that time you thought you would save is taken by the extra sanitation/clean up you have to do to those pieces of equipment that usually doesn't requires any, like mash tun, fly sparging manifold and many others. It is insane. You realize how filthy those parts are after years of brewing.
I did it and I can say, no more. Will make sure I get the time to brew in one shot.
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Old 02-02-2013, 11:53 PM   #9
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Hmm. I guess it's pretty easy for me because I do extract. The only extra step I do is cover the pot and saran wrap it.

At least you know now that's too much work for all grain.

E


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