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Old 02-01-2013, 03:47 AM   #1
n8huntsman
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I've heard a alot of people say this. Since the beer will produce co2 which is denser than o2, and keep a blanket over the beer.... blah, blah blah (I'll leave the validity of that argument to the threads that already exist). My question is to those who believe this to be true, is it bad to quickly "peak" into your conical or other non-clear fermenter once in a while? On one hand, the o2 should remain over the beer. On the other hand, when I want to peak, the fermentation is mostly over and not much co2 is being produced. I don't want to disturb the blanket and risk oxidizing the beer. I have a 15 gallon fermenter and only 5 gallon batches so I don't think peaking would do much harm. It should have a rather large blanket by the point that I'm peaking.

 
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Old 02-01-2013, 03:51 AM   #2
iambeer
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forget the bs CO2 blanket, it is a farce. most of us hb'ers don't have to worry about oxidation which this is about. just try not to allow light to touch your beer and minimize oxygen contact.

If you have a beer than will be around for more than a few months, especially.
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Old 02-01-2013, 03:51 AM   #3
PhelanKA7
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Beer produces CO2 not O2 and no peeking probably won't hurt... but it really won't help either unless you are monitoring gravity levels.

 
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Old 02-01-2013, 04:14 AM   #4
n8huntsman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhelanKA7 View Post
Beer produces CO2 not O2 and no peeking probably won't hurt... but it really won't help either unless you are monitoring gravity levels.
Sorry... typo. I had it right towards the end of the post, just typed incorrectly. It's fixed now.

I peaked a couple times mainly to see if the krausen had fallen and also to take a good whiff to check for off scents like acetaldehyde. I'd hate to be actually causing off flavors by ozidizing it though. Just wanted to check if there was consensus on the topic.

Thanks

 
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Old 02-01-2013, 05:21 AM   #5
GASoline71
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Trust me... just wait 14 - 20 days... then peek... with a hydrometer. Trust me.

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Old 02-01-2013, 05:55 AM   #6
dannylerch
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be patient, let it do its thing. looking into the bucket will not do anything to help the yeasties, only adds another variable/potential problem. Just set it and forget it for at least 3 to 4 weeks. Then bottle it and wait another 3 weeks. In the meantime, brew another beer maybe 2 weeks into primary. That way once you're drinking this batch, you'll have another coming, and another. Before you know it, you'll forget you had something bottled and the whole patience thing won't be an issue.

 
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Old 02-01-2013, 06:22 AM   #7
tackett
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Wait a minute stop.

I'm a newbie at beer, but not fluid dynamics.

Gas, cannot enter a still surface because of the surface tension. If simple exposure was enough to oxygenate a body of water, then there would be no such thing as stagnate pools.

In order for a gas to enter a fluid, the surface tension must be overcome. The two main ways this occurs is by making the outside pressure greater than the surface tension, or breaking the tension all together. (Surface agitation)

Remember back to the days of the aquariums? Remember how people had those bubble stones? It's a common misconception that the bubbles oxygenated the water. In fact, the act of the bubbles breaking the surface tension of the water, is what allows oxygen (and other gasses) to enter the water.

There is absolutely no way you are going to oxygenate a liquid, simply by exposing it.

A little bit of neat trivia for you.

The ocean is oxygenated only two ways. Through streams and rivers that enter it, and by the gravitational pull of the moon. The gravitational pull of the moon is what is responsible for creating both the waves themselves, and the tides. The big, air gulping waves are what gives the ocean over 90% of its dissolved o2 supply. If the moon were to be destroyed, then the earth would die. Because the ocean would stagnate and the organism that is responsible for 99% of the worlds oxygen supply would die off......(no, not trees as green peace would have you believe) Cyanobacteria. Or simply, algae.

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Old 02-01-2013, 06:27 AM   #8
iaefebs
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If you want to sneak a peak at the krausen you can use a flashlight. Shine it through the bucket lid toward the sidewall you should see what's happening. Like "iambeer" suggested above, the "layer of co2" is largely a myth. However, I don't pull the cover off the pail to check gravity since I use a refractometer. All I do is pull the airlock and stick a straw or pipette through the hole to draw a sample.

 
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Old 02-01-2013, 06:32 AM   #9
tackett
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And if you have saltwater aquariums. The refract is useful for both hobbies!

 
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Old 02-01-2013, 06:46 AM   #10
woknblues
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tackett View Post
Wait a minute stop.

I'm a newbie at beer, but not fluid dynamics.

Gas, cannot enter a still surface because of the surface tension. If simple exposure was enough to oxygenate a body of water, then there would be no such thing as stagnate pools.

In order for a gas to enter a fluid, the surface tension must be overcome. The two main ways this occurs is by making the outside pressure greater than the surface tension, or breaking the tension all together. (Surface agitation)

Remember back to the days of the aquariums? Remember how people had those bubble stones? It's a common misconception that the bubbles oxygenated the water. In fact, the act of the bubbles breaking the surface tension of the water, is what allows oxygen (and other gasses) to enter the water.

There is absolutely no way you are going to oxygenate a liquid, simply by exposing it.

A little bit of neat trivia for you.

The ocean is oxygenated only two ways. Through streams and rivers that enter it, and by the gravitational pull of the moon. The gravitational pull of the moon is what is responsible for creating both the waves themselves, and the tides. The big, air gulping waves are what gives the ocean over 90% of its dissolved o2 supply. If the moon were to be destroyed, then the earth would die. Because the ocean would stagnate and the organism that is responsible for 99% of the worlds oxygen supply would die off......(no, not trees as green peace would have you believe) Cyanobacteria. Or simply, algae.
I like the cut of your jib, Sir!

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