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Old 01-29-2013, 10:01 PM   #1
csoulies
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How hot is too hot for the carbonation periods for an ale? If there is a thread on this, some advice on searching the labyrinth would be much appreciated.



 
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Old 01-29-2013, 10:05 PM   #2
masterfool101
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I say for carbonating, leave the bottles about 2 weeks at room temperature. anything from about 65*F to 75*F should be just fine. Going over 80 isn't advisable, and anything under 65 will just add time to the process.


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Old 01-30-2013, 02:04 AM   #3
csoulies
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Thank you. Does going over 80 start fermentation again?

 
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Old 01-30-2013, 02:09 AM   #4
Varmintman
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When you add the sugar the fermentation process starts again but this time it is anaerobic and the goal is CO2. That is why it is so important to let your beer ferment fully before bottling

As long as it is not uncomfortable to you the yeast will be fine. Depending on the gravity of the beer it might take a long time to ferment but most average beers take about 3 weeks at room temp.

 
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Old 01-30-2013, 02:13 AM   #5
Rosvineer
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Follow up to the carb question. What is the conversion rate for different carbing sugars? ie DME, honey etc

 
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Old 01-30-2013, 02:20 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rosvineer View Post
Follow up to the carb question. What is the conversion rate for different carbing sugars? ie DME, honey etc
http://www.northernbrewer.com/priming-sugar-calculator/

 
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Old 01-30-2013, 03:13 AM   #7
csoulies
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Speaking of yeast settling, should I swirl the beer in the bottle prior to pouring? Silly question, I know...very noob here

 
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Old 01-30-2013, 03:21 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by csoulies View Post
Speaking of yeast settling, should I swirl the beer in the bottle prior to pouring? Silly question, I know...very noob here
No. Leave it caked at the bottom.

The first time, leave 1 oz on the bottom of the bottle. Swirl, then taste it. Do you like it?

If you don't like the taste (you probably won't), then you should always pour into a glass, then rinse the yeast down the drain before it hardens or gets funky. If you do like it, then might as well swirl that bad boy up and drink it down. It does have some vitamins.

I personally like the taste of wheat beer yeasts, but they're almost always suspended, so this isn't really an issue.
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Old 01-30-2013, 03:22 AM   #9
Ogri
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Quote:
Originally Posted by csoulies View Post
Speaking of yeast settling, should I swirl the beer in the bottle prior to pouring? Silly question, I know...very noob here
Depends if you prefer cloudy beer or clear beer in  your glass.

Some styles, hefe-weissen, witbier, etc are quite often served with the yeast swirled prior to pouring.

I usually pour off a first glass full of clear beer, drink that, then swirl the dregs in the bottom of the bottle and drink them as I enjoy the different taste that arises from the yeast being mixed in.

 
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Old 01-30-2013, 03:26 AM   #10
csoulies
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Much obliged, friends.



 
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