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Old 01-29-2013, 03:07 AM   #1
BrewRock_54
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I am brewing a Bourban Dubbell and an IPA. The IPA on the first day of fermenting put out gas bubbles for 2 days straight. The Bourbon Dubbell on the first day of fermentation put out bubbles for about a day. Should I be worried that the Bourbon Dubbell has gone bad? Or do some beer brews put out more gas then others?

 
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Old 01-29-2013, 03:12 AM   #2
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Every yeast strain acts differently. Different recipes can also give different results, even with the same yeast. Different temperatures, different situations can further alter things.

So yes, it's completely normal for the different brews to behave differently.
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Old 01-29-2013, 03:32 AM   #3
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the higher the original gravity more bubble you will see and the yeast that I was already mentioned, will all play factors.
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Old 01-29-2013, 03:47 AM   #4
BrewRock_54
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gear101
the higher the original gravity more bubble you will see and the yeast that I was already mentioned, will all play factors.
That makes me worry cause the Bourbon Dubbell is higher ABV then the IPA. Bourbon Dubbell is 7.0% and IPA is 6.8%

 
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Old 01-29-2013, 05:07 AM   #5
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RDWHAHB. That means relax, don't worry, have a homebrew. Your beer will be totally fine!!

 
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Old 01-29-2013, 05:15 AM   #6
BrewRock_54
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You know that's all I needed to hear...

 
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Old 01-29-2013, 05:22 AM   #7
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lol... chill out, OP. Different recipes, different yeasts. They will act differently.

Bubbles are fun, but they mean NOTHING. Relax.

Yeast know how to make beer. They don't need your help. Let them do it!
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Old 01-29-2013, 01:43 PM   #8
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Relax.

Each fermentation is different. You can have low gravity beers go crazy and high gravity beers just chug along. As long as it is fermenting you are fine.

 
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Old 01-29-2013, 01:54 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BrewRock_54 View Post
I am brewing a Bourban Dubbell and an IPA. The IPA on the first day of fermenting put out gas bubbles for 2 days straight. The Bourbon Dubbell on the first day of fermentation put out bubbles for about a day. Should I be worried that the Bourbon Dubbell has gone bad? Or do some beer brews put out more gas then others?
I'm confused if you are after 'rate of bubbling/out gassing' or 'total quanity'

The beer with the greatest gravity change should release the most CO2, It may not release it in a way that is noticible by you (you sleep right? and work?) As others put it yeast, temps, etc can change rate of release.

but roughly, for every 1 glucose the yeast takes up, it makes 2 co2 and 2 ethyl alcohol. There is a little fudging because in the begining, sugars go into making new yeast with the O2 and yeast nuetriants. But anyhow since that is the chemistry, a larger OG should result in a larger CO2 release, but things like temps, rate of conversion, work, sleep, seals on containers, etc will all screw with you. Hydrometers are your way to be sure.

 
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