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Old 02-01-2013, 06:47 PM   #11
grathan
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If you don't hear any leaks at 25 psi then it's not gonna leak out overnight at 6 psi

Google 'carbonation chart'. I usually shoot for 2.5 volumes co2. Which would be closer to 9psi serving pressure.

More co2 will be absorbed 25psi so yeah shorter time. Shaking the keg greatly reduces the time required as well. I usually leave mine at 9psi for a month, but if you shook it for 5 minutes, 34 degrees, at 25 psi it might be ready next day, might even be over carbed so use caution until you develop a system.

.

 
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Old 02-01-2013, 07:00 PM   #12
JuanMoore
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grathan View Post
Conditioning at room temperature is for bottles to develop carbonation. And that is because priming sugar gets added before bottling. If your not adding priming sugar to the keg then there is no need for room temperature.
Not necessarily. IMO it depends on the beer. A lot of beers benefit from extended aging at cellar temps, or a few weeks at room temp. For an IPA or other hop forward beer, I like to get it chilled and carbed ASAP to retain as much hop flavor and aroma as possible. For malty, higher gravity, or trappist ales like the OP's, I like to let them age at cellar temps for a few months first. Unless I was in a big rush to drink it, I wouldn't cold crash and force carb a trappist ale after only 3 weeks, but that's JMO.
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Old 02-01-2013, 07:08 PM   #13
philly224
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Okay I think I'll just set to 10 psi which looks like a good number based of that chart and leave it for at least two weeks. I have it set to 25 right now (for close to 24 hr) when I get home should I just bleed the keg to get it down to 10 or do I do that with the dial on the regulator?

 
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Old 02-01-2013, 07:15 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by philly224 View Post
Okay I think I'll just set to 10 psi which looks like a good number based of that chart and leave it for at least two weeks. I have it set to 25 right now (for close to 24 hr) when I get home should I just bleed the keg to get it down to 10 or do I do that with the dial on the regulator?
You'll need to do both. Turn the gas way down, bleed the keg, and then turn it up to 10psi. That is unless you have one of the fancy new regulators that vents excess pressure when you turn it down.
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Old 02-01-2013, 07:17 PM   #15
philly224
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Alright thanks a lot! I'll do that when I get home.

 
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Old 02-01-2013, 07:35 PM   #16
Conan
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When I burst-carb before putting the keg in the fridge I do so at 30psi. Once the keg goes in the fridge I set it to serving pressure, 12psi for all styles, and don't vent the keg when doing so. Typically it was only at high pressure for 2-3 days max and still has a large capacity for dissolving CO2. So, leaving the 30psi in the headspace (which has decreased some by now due to dissolving into the beer) and simply maintaining 12psi from the reg. will only allow a minimum of 12psi in the keg. It's not like pressure is additive- i.e, I won't get 42psi.
Also, this 'flooding the keg before filling' is nonsense. Sorry to all those that stand behind it, but realistically the beer has to be splashed heavily during transfer to aerate it at all. As proof: ever walk by a swamp that doesn't have any wave action? Well, the leaves in that swamp will be in tact, which is evidence of anaerobic water. Stir that swamp, splash around in it, and you've introduced oxygen to the water. The same thing happens with your keg. The keg isn't pressurized with atmospheric air so why on earth would the air want to go into the beer? You have to force gas into a liquid. Just the two contacting each other won't cause a transfer. In the long run it's your CO2 you're flushing out the top of an empty keg.

End rant, off podium. Kyle

 
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Old 02-01-2013, 09:05 PM   #17
techbrewie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grathan View Post
Conditioning at room temperature is for bottles to develop carbonation. And that is because priming sugar gets added before bottling. If your not adding priming sugar to the keg then there is no need for room temperature.
This isn't necessarily true. Yes you need your bottles at room temp to carb. this is so the yeast will eat your priming sugar and produce co2 to carb. This is not what conditioning is though.

Conditioning refers to chemical processes that take place over time after fermentation. The harsh alcohol flavors mellow in your beer, other off tasting chemicals dissipate, and the other flavors in your beer blend together. The best way to illustrate this process is to bottle 4-8 of the beers in your batch and date them 1 day, 1 week, 2 weeks etc. from your bottling date. then sample your beer on those dates. You will notice a vast different between 1 and 4 weeks out and varying effects beyond that depending on style. Patience and time is an important component that separates good beer from great beer. To condition, your beer does need to be at room temperature. as temp drops conditioning time increases exponentially. 70-75 seems to be the ideal conditioning temp range.

For Kegs You do not have to carb while conditioning but make sure you purce the headspace with co2 and fill the dip tube with beer (ensuring no air remains in the dip tube). once cooled in the kegerator your beer wont condition much from that point.
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Old 02-02-2013, 11:56 PM   #18
grathan
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Ok techbrewie. I'll bite. Why does beer need to condition at room temperature after 3 weeks in the primary? I think your using the term exponentially quite loosely. My beers do take 3 months to condition, but I feel the time and results would be quite similar warm or cold after 3 week primary.

 
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