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Old 01-27-2013, 02:38 AM   #1
gbx
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Ok, there are some very mainstream Canadian beers that are not represented by the BJCP style guide so I thought I'd write a first draft of the style guidelines. Most of this is just a cut and paste job with a search and replace with Canadian spelling ("flavour" is spelled with a "u"!!!!) and added some marketing copy for the descriptions. Let me know what you think or if I missed anything. ...and yes, this was started as a joke but it probably doesn't have to be.


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Category 29 Canadian Premium Lager
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29A. Honey Brown Lager
Aroma: Little to no malt aroma. Medium-low to no roast and caramel malt aroma. Hop aroma may range from none to light struck. Can have low levels of yeast character (green apples, DMS, or fruitiness). No diacetyl.

Appearance: Golden to amber brown. Foam stand may not be long lasting, and is usually light tan in colour.

Flavour: Moderately crisp with some low to moderate levels of sweetness. Medium-low to no caramel. Hop flavour ranges from none to offensively skunky. Hop bitterness at low to medium levels. No diacetyl. May have a very light fruitiness. Burnt or moderately strong roasted malt flavours are a defect.

Mouthfeel: Light to somewhat medium body. Smooth, although a highly-carbonated beer.

Overall Impression: A somewhat sweeter version of standard/premium lager with a little more body and flavour.

History: Est. in Guelph Ont in 1834 (1988), was originally brewed by pirates and was a popular beer of Al Capone during prohibition.

Ingredients: Honey, Two- or six-row barley, corn or rice as adjuncts. Light use of caramel and darker malts.

Vital Statistics:
OG: 1.044 – 1.050
IBUs: 8 – 20
FG: 1.008 – 1.012
SRM: 6 – 10
ABV: 4.5 – 5.5%

Commercial Examples: Sleeman's Honey Brown Lager, Whistler Bear Paw Honey Lager, Big Rock Honey Brown Lager, Granville Island Cypress Honey Lager, Cariboo Honey Lager

===============================================

29B. West Coast Dark Cream Ale
Aroma: Little to no malt aroma. Medium-low to no roast and caramel malt aroma. Hop aroma may range from none to light. Can have low levels of yeast character (green apples, DMS, or fruitiness). No diacetyl.

Appearance: Deep amber to dark brown with bright clarity and ruby highlights. Foam stand may not be long lasting, and is usually light tan in colour.

Flavour: Moderately crisp with some low to moderate levels of sweetness. Medium-low to no caramel. Hop flavour ranges from none to none. Hop bitterness at low to medium levels. No diacetyl. May have a very light fruitiness. Burnt or moderately strong roasted malt flavours are a defect.

Mouthfeel: Light to somewhat medium body. Smooth, although a highly-carbonated beer.
Overall Impression: A darker, somewhat sweeter version of standard/premium lager with a little more body and flavour.

Comments: Recently breweries have attempted to rebrand their dark cream ales as "English Session Milds" despite lack of any "English" character and remaining 5% ABV (all beer MUST be 5% abv!!!!!)

Ingredients: Two-row barley, corn or rice as adjuncts. Light use of caramel and darker malts.

Vital Statistics:
OG: 1.044 – 1.050
IBUs: 8 – 20
FG: 1.008 – 1.012
SRM: 15-20
ABV: 4.5 – 5.5%

Commercial Examples: Russell Cream Ale, R&B Raven Cream Ale, Big Rock Worthog Cream Ale, Whistler Black Tusk Ale

===============================================

29C. East Coast India Pale Ale
Aroma: Low to medium-low malt aroma, which can be grainy, sweet or corn-like. Hop aroma may range from very low to a medium-low, spicy or floral hop presence. Low levels of yeast character (green apples, DMS, or fruitiness) are optional but acceptable. No diacetyl.

Appearance: Pale straw to gold colour. White, frothy head may not be long lasting. Very clear.

Flavour: Crisp and dry flavour with some low levels of grainy or malty sweetness. Hop flavour ranges from none to low levels. Hop bitterness at low to medium level. Balance may vary from slightly malty to slightly bitter, but is relatively close to even. High levels of carbonation may provide a slight acidity or dry "sting." No diacetyl. No fruitiness.

Mouthfeel: Medium-light body from use of adjuncts such as rice or corn. Highly carbonated with slight carbonic bite on the tongue.

Overall Impression: Refreshing and thirst quenching. Those who like it, like it a lot.

Comments: Hop forward versions are not to style and should be entered in Category 14.

History: Originating in Halifax in 1820, marketed as an IPA long after other breweries had stopped using the name and before the modern craft beer movement redefined the style.

Ingredients: Two- or six-row barley with up to 25% rice or corn as adjuncts.

Vital Statistics:
OG: 1.046 – 1.056
IBUs: 15 – 25
FG: 1.008 – 1.012
SRM: 2 – 6
ABV: 4.6 – 6%

Commercial Examples: Alexander Keith's India Pale Ale


===============================================

29D. Canadian Red
Aroma: Low to medium-low malt aroma, which can be grainy, sweet or corn-like. Hop aroma may range from very low to a medium-low, spicy or floral hop presence. Low levels of yeast character (green apples, DMS, or fruitiness) are optional but acceptable. No diacetyl.

Appearance: A distinctive ruby-red colour. White, frothy head may not be long lasting. Very clear.

Flavour: Up front it layers a hint of brewer's caramel with a light bitterness from roasted malts. But the caramel's sweetness balances out the bitterness to yield a smooth finish with no lingering aftertaste. High levels of carbonation may provide a slight acidity or dry "sting." No diacetyl. No fruitiness.

Mouthfeel: Medium-light body from use of adjuncts such as rice or corn. Highly carbonated with slight carbonic bite on the tongue.

Overall Impression: Refreshing and thirst quenching, although generally more filling than standard/lite versions.

Comments: Canadian Reds tend to have fewer adjuncts than standard/lite lagers, and can be all-malt. Strong flavours are a fault, but Canadian Reds have more flavour than standard/lite lagers.

Ingredients: Two- or six-row barley with up to 3 roasted malts

Vital Statistics:
OG: 1.046 – 1.056
IBUs: 15 – 25
FG: 1.008 – 1.012
SRM: 10 – 15
ABV: 4.6 – 6%

Commercial Examples: Rickard's Red, Alexander Keith's Red Amber Ale



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Old 01-27-2013, 02:46 AM   #2
maverick9862
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Oct 2012
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Interesting how you've defined Canadian styles within the ABV: 4.5-6%-ish range, and generally "highly carbonated".

Also, just a formatting point that style 29B (cream ale) the commercial examples are below the break instead of within the style description.



 
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Old 01-27-2013, 02:52 AM   #3
gbx
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Feb 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maverick9862 View Post
Interesting how you've defined Canadian styles within the ABV: 4.5-6%-ish range, and generally "highly carbonated".

Also, just a formatting point that style 29B (cream ale) the commercial examples are below the break instead of within the style description.
Thanks, corrected!

and all Canadian beer must be 5% ABV, served cold and highly carbonated. Its the Canadian Reinheitsgebot.

 
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Old 01-27-2013, 02:55 AM   #4
ktblunden
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I can honestly say I've never heard of any of those brands. Don't you guys send anything down here other than Molson?

 
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Old 01-27-2013, 03:01 AM   #5
gbx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ktblunden View Post
I can honestly say I've never heard of any of those brands. Don't you guys send anything down here other than Molson?
You can live a full and satisfying life without tasting any of the beers in this style guide. I know we send more than just Molson - I've bought Moosehead lager at ABC stores in Hawaii and doesn't everyone in the US love Maudite?

 
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Old 01-27-2013, 03:04 AM   #6
ktblunden
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Ah yes, forgot about Moosehead (not much better) and Unibroue (definitely redeeming).

 
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Old 01-28-2013, 05:34 PM   #7
HopHoarder
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All of the above styles could be considered as Craft Beer for the masses or perhaps a "gateway" style of craft beer to get people into the enjoyment of true craft beer. Sleeman Honey Brown is quite popular, at least out here in the Vancouver area and is usually found in drinking establishments that only serve bland Canadian/ Coors/ Bud otherwise.
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Old 01-29-2013, 12:47 AM   #8
gbx
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Feb 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HopHoarder View Post
All of the above styles could be considered as Craft Beer for the masses or perhaps a "gateway" style of craft beer to get people into the enjoyment of true craft beer. Sleeman Honey Brown is quite popular, at least out here in the Vancouver area and is usually found in drinking establishments that only serve bland Canadian/ Coors/ Bud otherwise.
Yeah, most of the "style guide" is a joke and digs at beers like Alexander Keith's and Rickards Red (the guideline is a cut and paste of the american lager guidelines) and the weird black cream ales that breweries in BC make...but a legitimate case for "Honey Lager" could be made. Its a distinct lager syle but just the numbers of commercial examples is reason enough for it to be represented in the style guide - classic american pilsner has no commercial examples. ...and the number of times I've offered to bring a keg of homebrew to a party and I ask them what they want. If they aren't beer people, they ALWAYS say "Honey Lager". ...so is skunkiness a feature of the style or a flaw? I grew up southern ontario and had never had a bottle that was skunked. Here in vancouver every bottle of sleeman's I've had is in rough rough shape.

...and a good argument could be made for Alexander Keith's IPA to be its own style.

 
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Old 01-29-2013, 12:58 AM   #9
WesleyBrewViking
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Since subcategory 29A is the only lager and the rest are ales, it doesn't seem appropriate to call the category "Category 29 Canadian Premium Lager." I like the concept though.

 
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Old 01-29-2013, 01:28 AM   #10
patthebrewer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ktblunden View Post
I can honestly say I've never heard of any of those brands. Don't you guys send anything down here other than Molson?
Canadian Brewing laws are wierd, lots of local brews you can only get in the provinces that can't be exported even to other provinces much less, the US.

My dad has a place NFLD, and I've travel to some of the other provinces.


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