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Old 01-25-2013, 06:39 PM   #1
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Do you generally use the same amount of bittering hops as you would at say 60min?

What seems to work best as far as late additions go? Do you just use your normal late additions like 15 and flame out for example?

TIA

Rick
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Old 01-25-2013, 06:51 PM   #2
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I recently did my first fwh ipa so I only really know how to convert a recipe to fwh using Palmers advice. Your 'meant' to move 30~40% of the latest additions as fwh. I.e calculate total AAUs, find say 35% of that and starting with flameout work backwards robbing from late additions. You're not meant to touch the standard bittering additions. I know a lot of people here do it differently but apparently that's the 'right' way. And before anyone has a go at my reference to the 'right' way I know!

 
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Old 01-25-2013, 06:53 PM   #3
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Lots of info and opinions on this subject if you do some searching.

I tend to be in the school of thought that a FWH imparts a bittnerness that tastes like a 20 min addition. From a theoretical standpoint I believe the IBU contribution is the same as a 60 min addition but the way it tastes on the palate is less because the alpha acids are isomerized at a lower temperature before boiling.

My advice is to use them, and if you like a good level of bitterness on the tounge then use a 60 min addition as well. I personally do it both ways, with or without the 60 min, depending on what im looking for.

 
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Old 01-25-2013, 06:53 PM   #4
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From Brew365...

http://www.brew365.com/technique_firstworthopping.php

Definition
First Wort Hopping is a bittering technique where you provide a flavor/aroma hop addition into the warm wort as it is received from your mash tun before boiling. As the boil kettle fills, the hops immediately begin releasing their oils into the wort. Because they are added below boiling temperature, where the coumpunds that provide aroma to your beer normally boil off, the oils are converted to more soluble compounds in the liquid, and do not boil off as readily during the boil. You should use some of the hops that you would normally use in the last 20 minutes of your boil.
Common wisdom says that the amount of bittering imparted to your beer is roughly equivalent to the same hops added for 20 minutes. However, there is still some debate over this fact on the online message boards.

Technique
The technique is quite straight-forward. Add a portion of your lower-acid aroma or flavor hops into your boil kettle by themselves right before you are ready to drain your mash tun. As you drain your mash tun the warm wort will start to go to work on the hops. The easiest way to calculate the final IBU contribution is to use a software program like BeerSmith. I usually set my first wort hop addition to 90 minutes because I am a batch sparger, and it takes me about a half hour to get all the wort into the kettle.

Advantages
First Wort Hopping seems to result in a bit more refined hop aroma. The bitterness is less harsh and more uniform. It is something I would encourage you to try for yourself to see the differences.

Disadvantage
The only real disadvantage I can see in this technique is the difficulty you may have in calculating exacly the amount of IBU imparted. Sparges never really take exactly the same length of time, and other variables always seem to come into play in even the best brew day. But, hey, the worst that can happen is you have a bit hoppier beer ... not a bad thing in my personal estimation.

Appropriate Beer Styles
I would not use this technique in beer styles that do not showcase the hop flavor and aroma as one of the major constituents of the beer. Try this in APA, IPA, ESB, and even hop-forward Pilsner style beers.

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Old 01-25-2013, 07:00 PM   #5
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I also estimate the bittering contribution to be the same as adding them for the last 20 min of the boil. I have my own spreadsheet for brewing so I just adjust my hops until I get the bitterness I'm looking for but also the late additions I want. This usually means that I pull out some of the bittering hops for use as FWH so that I can still go heavier on the late additions. Doesn't really matter how you do it. After your first couple batches with FWH you'll see where you need to make adjustments for your tastes. I usually never use less than an OZ for FWH in a 5 gallon batch, but I use lower alpha aroma hops mainly.
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Old 01-25-2013, 07:22 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BBL_Brewer View Post
I also estimate the bittering contribution to be the same as adding them for the last 20 min of the boil. I have my own spreadsheet for brewing so I just adjust my hops until I get the bitterness I'm looking for but also the late additions I want. This usually means that I pull out some of the bittering hops for use as FWH so that I can still go heavier on the late additions. Doesn't really matter how you do it. After your first couple batches with FWH you'll see where you need to make adjustments for your tastes. I usually never use less than an OZ for FWH in a 5 gallon batch, but I use lower alpha aroma hops mainly.
Great stuff guys!

My next brew is an all grain pale ale, I'm using cascade and citra hops. I'll have to do some cyphering obviously but I think I can come up with something drinkable.

Rick
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Old 01-25-2013, 07:27 PM   #7
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I recently did my first AG batch and had read about FWH a day or so before the brew, so I tried it.
After reading this thread, I realized that I misinterpreted the "30%" of total IBU's

I read it to mean 30% of the total hop schedule, so I added roughly 0.5 ounces (of 3ounces total) as a FWH.

As far as BeerSmith was concerned, the change in my IBU's went from 28.6 down to 24.5 when I made this change, so based on what I had read about FWH it seems like it would work well.

I will be sure and drink all of it and then report back as far as quality control.

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Old 01-25-2013, 10:32 PM   #8
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My first fwh beer is still tasting green, but from trying the first bottle all I can say is that it seems a but under buttered although the original recipe came in at 38ibus. Here's the thread I started checking out fwh. Worth a read
http://www.biabrewer.info/viewtopic.php?t=1798

 
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Old 01-26-2013, 02:24 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larso View Post
My first fwh beer is still tasting green, but from trying the first bottle all I can say is that it seems a but under buttered although the original recipe came in at 38ibus. Here's the thread I started checking out fwh. Worth a read
http://www.biabrewer.info/viewtopic.php?t=1798
Larso, it was worth a read, interesting thread.

I may change this, but right now I'm contemplating using a 1/2 ounce of Citra at FWH, a 1/4 ounce of Cascade at 60, 1/4 ounce Citra at 15 and at FO, and then DH with a 1/2 ounce of Citra for the last 5 days.

Rick
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