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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Hop-stand Additions
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Old 05-12-2013, 06:07 PM   #11
Dave1096
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Any thoughts on how the use of gelatin to clear up the suspended yeast might affect the benefits of a hopstand?


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Old 05-12-2013, 10:18 PM   #12
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I've been having great success with throwing in a large FO hop stand addition, giving it a good stir ("whirlpool"), then putting the lid on my BK and letting it sit for 30 minutes. This give excellent flavor extraction, the best I have ever achieved.

I have not had as great of luck with the "aroma" hop stand, which you should do in the 170-160F temp range. I think this week I am going to move to a small bittering addition at 60 minutes, maybe about 20-25 IBUs, and then get the rest of IBUs from a flavor hop stand, and skip the aroma. I will then rely on a dry hop and keg hop addition for aroma.

This all being for an IPA.

Source: http://byo.com/component/k2/item/2808-hop-stands


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Old 05-13-2013, 06:49 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scottland View Post
Personally, I don't feel that you are 'destroying' volatile compounds with high temperatures. So once the wort is no longer boiling, I believe most of those compounds are staying in the wort. Cooling to 180*, should in theory only slow extraction.
The flash points for at least two of the major essential hop oils (myrcene & humulene) are 90F and 103F, respectively. So you are absolutely losing volatile compounds with high wort temperatures.

Isomerization of alpha acids (humulone, adhumulone, cohumulone, etc.) is still occuring above 180F, so there will be bitterness/flavor development, but the major drivers of aroma and to a lesser extent, certain aspects of hop flavor are lost. This is why a warm/cold hop stand may be beneficial, just as there is really no 1:1 substitue in the boil/hopstand for dry-hopping.
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Old 03-10-2014, 03:08 PM   #14
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Default hopstand question

Trying to research hopstand. I have only done this twice. I make, almost exclusively so far (but Im only about 20 batches in about a yr), IPAS. I like big aroma. I experimented allowing my kettle to coast down to 170* and then hopped. I manually whirlpooled down to 130* (covered once, uncovered once) then headed for the ice bath. This was advice from a buddy. Both batches turned out ok but I hope they could be better by evolving technique. I thought I was on the right track until I read this: A hop stand in the 160170 F (7177 C) range will basically shut down the alpha acid isomerization reaction and the lower temperatures will reduce the vaporization of the essential oils. Homebrewers can use their wort chillers to bring the wort down to this range before adding the knockout hops or they can add a second dose of knockout hops. In the BYO article here, http://byo.com/component/k2/item/2808-hop-stands .I think I want shut down isomerization to pick up flavor and aroma, right? Question is since I went from ice bath to gravity plate chiller (I dont have a copper chiller), how bad is it to coast down (covered/uncovered)? Am I going to have to figure out how to plate chill half or so of my wort and add back to kettle to get to 170*? Anybody else coasting?
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Old 03-10-2014, 03:14 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobbrews View Post
Hot Hop Additions (Simmering / Boiling Temps)
Approx. 180-212 F. @ the full length of your boil

Warm Hop Additions (Not Simmering / Not Scalding Hot)
Approx. 100-160 F @ 20-60 minutes depending on cooling method; lesser than this isn't doing much

Cold Hop Additions (Dryhop Temps)
Approx. 65-68 F @ 5-14 day dryhop, whether single stage or staggered
Personal experience / opinion or documented trials?
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Old 03-10-2014, 03:51 PM   #16
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Personal experience / opinion or documented trials?
Rookie here so I'm willing to try just about anything reasonable to improve my brews. You have experience with "coasting", or the covered/uncovered issue? I'll take it and try it. Thanks
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Old 03-10-2014, 04:17 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by DragonHead View Post
Trying to research hopstand. I have only done this twice. I make, almost exclusively so far (but Im only about 20 batches in about a yr), IPAS. I like big aroma. I experimented allowing my kettle to coast down to 170* and then hopped. I manually whirlpooled down to 130* (covered once, uncovered once) then headed for the ice bath. This was advice from a buddy. Both batches turned out ok but I hope they could be better by evolving technique. I thought I was on the right track until I read this: A hop stand in the 160170 F (7177 C) range will basically shut down the alpha acid isomerization reaction and the lower temperatures will reduce the vaporization of the essential oils. Homebrewers can use their wort chillers to bring the wort down to this range before adding the knockout hops or they can add a second dose of knockout hops. In the BYO article here, http://byo.com/component/k2/item/2808-hop-stands .I think I want shut down isomerization to pick up flavor and aroma, right? Question is since I went from ice bath to gravity plate chiller (I dont have a copper chiller), how bad is it to coast down (covered/uncovered)? Am I going to have to figure out how to plate chill half or so of my wort and add back to kettle to get to 170*? Anybody else coasting?
Thanks for posting. I brewed an IPA on Saturday night. I did a whirlpool addition of 1.5 oz Simcoe, 1.5 oz Citra. I planned to chill to 180F, cut the water (copper IC), add my addition and whirlpool using a pump/recirculating arm for 30 min. I should have cut the water sooner as the combination of ambient temps (garage was in 40s) and cold water in the chiller pushed the wort temp down to around 168F. I whirlpooled for 25 minutes, then chilled the rest of the way.
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Old 03-10-2014, 09:43 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spenghali View Post
I've been having great success with throwing in a large FO hop stand addition, giving it a good stir ("whirlpool"), then putting the lid on my BK and letting it sit for 30 minutes. This give excellent flavor extraction, the best I have ever achieved.
Source: http://byo.com/component/k2/item/2808-hop-stands
Do we need to worry about DMS issues with putting the lid on the kettle during a hopstand?
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Old 03-10-2014, 11:46 PM   #19
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Only above 180F or so. Once it's below that, you can safely put the lid on, and should to keep those volatile hop oils from boiling away as much as possible.
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Old 03-11-2014, 02:58 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by opiate82 View Post
Do we need to worry about DMS issues with putting the lid on the kettle during a hopstand?
i throw the hops in right at flame out and put the lid on right away. in my case i have not detected DMS.


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