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Old 01-25-2013, 06:00 AM   #1
Gavagai
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As far as I can see, there are three reasonable strategies for adding hops during a hop stand.

1. Standard method: add hops at flame out, perform hop stand, then chill.

2. Chill wort to a certain temperature (e.g., 180), add hops, perform hop stand, finish chilling. The idea here is to find a temperature which will promote efficient extraction while minimizing destruction of aromatic compounds.

3. Use multiple hop additions in the hop stand (e.g., 1 at flameout, 1 at 190, 1 at 180, etc.). Given that different aromatic compounds extract and are destroyed at different temperatures, this method theoretically might allow for a more balanced extraction.

Has anyone done comparisons between different ways of performing a hop stand? Anyone know if any of the pros are doing similar things with whirlpool hops?

 
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Old 01-29-2013, 10:25 AM   #2
VladOfTrub
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There's a guy in Yakima that adds hops when his front yard hop stand is low on stock. Then he performs the hop stand, by standing on one leg and hopping around on the other leg. You have to see it to appreciate the artistry, when he is performing the hop stand.

 
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Old 01-29-2013, 08:48 PM   #3
scottland
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I've tried both (adding at flameout, and adding at like 180*), and didn't see any tangible difference. Albeit, I didn't do a split batch experiment.

Personally, I don't feel that you are 'destroying' volatile compounds with high temperatures. So once the wort is no longer boiling, I believe most of those compounds are staying in the wort. Cooling to 180*, should in theory only slow extraction.

At the end of the day, I'm lazy, so the hops go in when the flame goes off. I start a timer, and start chilling the wort when the timer goes 'ding'
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Old 01-29-2013, 08:56 PM   #4
BetterSense
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How long do people do this? 5min? 20min? I always started chilling immediately but I'm new to this late-hops thing.

 
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Old 01-29-2013, 10:19 PM   #5
scottland
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I do 10-15min. Diminishing returns set in. Play around with it though.
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Old 01-29-2013, 10:54 PM   #6
Gavagai
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Quote:
Personally, I don't feel that you are 'destroying' volatile compounds with high temperatures. So once the wort is no longer boiling, I believe most of those compounds are staying in the wort. Cooling to 180*, should in theory only slow extraction.
I suppose 'destroy' wasn't the best word, but hop oils will volatilize more quickly at higher temperatures. That's just the nature of volatile compounds. Whether there is a significant difference between 210F and 180F remains to be seen.

Quote:
How long do people do this? 5min? 20min? I always started chilling immediately but I'm new to this late-hops thing.
20 - 40 minutes seems to be the most common among homebrewers, but pro brewers often whirlpool for significantly longer. There's a study cited in For the Love of Hops (p. 201) showing significant improvement in hop aroma with an 80 minute steep vs. a 50 minute steep.

 
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Old 01-30-2013, 01:29 AM   #7
wobdee
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Many people say you will lose much of that aroma from a hop stand during fermentation so maybe it's better to dry hop? I still think you get some great flavor with this technique.

 
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Old 01-30-2013, 02:16 AM   #8
scottland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gavagai View Post
20 - 40 minutes seems to be the most common among homebrewers, but pro brewers often whirlpool for significantly longer. There's a study cited in For the Love of Hops (p. 201) showing significant improvement in hop aroma with an 80 minute steep vs. a 50 minute steep.
Ya, I remember reading that too. I thnk it's something people should really just experiment with. There's little risk involved, and you'll find what works well for you.

I found that 15min and 30min weren't much different, so 15min was good enough for me.
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Old 01-30-2013, 02:38 PM   #9
GinSlinger
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At what point is there a potential negative effect on cold break?

 
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Old 02-01-2013, 03:15 PM   #10
bobbrews
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Hot Hop Additions (Simmering / Boiling Temps)
Approx. 180-212 F. @ the full length of your boil

Warm Hop Additions (Not Simmering / Not Scalding Hot)
Approx. 100-160 F @ 20-60 minutes depending on cooling method; lesser than this isn't doing much

Cold Hop Additions (Dryhop Temps)
Approx. 65-68 F @ 5-14 day dryhop, whether single stage or staggered

 
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