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Old 01-22-2013, 01:33 PM   #1
DRonco
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Over the last month I built a fermentation chamber out of a 14cuft chest freezer controlled by the STC-1000.

My question is this: what type of temp schedule should I follow to get the best fermentation in the shortest amount of time? I pitched a 1L starter into a Schell's London Stout about 36 hours ago. I'm controlling the fermentation with the probe insulated to the side of the bucket and set to the low end of the range (66*) for Wyeast 1968. I've heard of techniques used to facilitate or speed up the D-rest by bumping the temp up towards the end of fermentation. Is that right after the vigorous fermentation or later then that? How much temp change at a time and over what period of time?

TIA for any tips and advice. Looking forward to my first temp controlled brew!

 
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Old 01-22-2013, 05:49 PM   #2
DRonco
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Any advise or experience?

 
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Old 01-22-2013, 06:05 PM   #3
Misplaced_Canuck
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I wouldn't try to rush the fermentation. 66F or 68F is fine for Wyeast 1968.

Diacetyl rests are generally done for lagers, where you ferment in the 48-50F range and after most of the fermentation is done, you progressively raise the ferm temp to 68F for 2-3 days.

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Old 01-22-2013, 06:09 PM   #4

For most beers, I leave the temp set at the same rate for the whole fermentation. But if I'm worried about attenuation, then I will slowly ramp up the temp, say a degree or two a day.

 
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Old 01-22-2013, 06:36 PM   #5
DRonco
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Originally Posted by Pappers_ View Post
For most beers, I leave the temp set at the same rate for the whole fermentation. But if I'm worried about attenuation, then I will slowly ramp up the temp, say a degree or two a day.
I typically don't take hydro readings for at least 2 weeks, 3 if I'm feeling exceptionally patient. (it's rare) Should I stick to that for a temp controlled brew? Are hydro readings the only clues to attenuation?

 
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Old 01-24-2013, 12:02 AM   #6
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Yes! That's the only real way (or refractometers). I would say there is no reason to do a diacetyl rest for ales unless you ferment them very cool (60 or so) or your attenuation is stuck. Just leave it be for 2-3 weeks, crash cool and keg.
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Old 01-24-2013, 03:15 PM   #7
DRonco
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Thanks guys for the tips. I'm still learning as I go so I appreciate all the help I can get.
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Yes! That's the only real way (or refractometers). I would say there is no reason to do a diacetyl rest for ales unless you ferment them very cool (60 or so) or your attenuation is stuck. Just leave it be for 2-3 weeks, crash cool and keg.
I'll be bottling, what's a goid temp to crash and how long should I hold it there?

 
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Old 01-24-2013, 04:12 PM   #8
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Everybody has their own temperature control process, here's mine. I set my dual stage temp controller to the middle of the published temp range for the yeast, unless I'm trying to stress the yeast to produce a particular flavor. I did a temp study once and learned that the internal temp of the wort is generally about 3-4 degrees above that read by the sensor taped to the side of the bucket. I have the controller set to the default 3 degree swing. I leave it for 4 weeks, then bottle.

 
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Old 01-27-2013, 12:28 AM   #9
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crash to 40 overnight up to 2 days then bottle. Let it warm back up to room temp after you bottle to carb.
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Primary: Climbing stout
Primary #2: ESB
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Tasty Remembrances: White 'N Nerdy, Dynamite Red (Hop bursted), APA, The Bonaduce (irish Red), runners stout, ridgeback brown,

from my big ass computer sitting on my floor

 
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