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Old 01-12-2013, 01:17 PM   #1
Knecht_Rupprecht
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How valuable is it doing a three tiered mash verses just one?

Ie. If I'm making a partial mash maibock (6# of grain, 4# dme) is it worth having a schedule of

122 - 10 minutes
149- 20 min
155- 20 minutes

Or

152 -60 minutes

Thoughts?

 
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Old 01-12-2013, 01:23 PM   #2
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What is your mash schedule going to gain you? If you are looking for specific characteristics in your beer and the mash schedule will get you those then go for it. I used to do a protien rest for my wheat beers but now just mash right at 152F and have not noticed any difference.
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Old 01-12-2013, 01:40 PM   #3
Knecht_Rupprecht
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That is my question. I've seen both schedules for my recipe and I'm not sure what the merits of both are.

 
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Old 01-13-2013, 03:53 AM   #4
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The benefits from a step mash can be small. Some think it is worth it anyway, some not. I always step mash as it is easy for me. I do steps at 122, 147, and 160 followed by a 170 mash out. Depending on the style I change the time at each step. Crisper gets more time at 147, fuller gets less time at 147, and more time at 160. Basically I am optimizing first for B-amylase which improves fermentability, and then for A-amylase which can still leave some limit dextrins for improved body.

I think you might want to widen the gap in the two saccharification steps. I use my step at 160 as there I am more sure I'm getting much less B-amylase activity
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Old 01-13-2013, 01:30 PM   #5
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You have to remember that with those traditional rests for the mash, that was with using under modified malts.

For a Maibock, though, I would recommend decoction mashing to get the maximum flavor from the malts and to produce a more true to style beer. Maibocks where traditionally brewed using triple decoction and those rest temps (which served more purpose back in the day) will allow you to do all 3 decoctions.

 
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Old 01-14-2013, 01:19 PM   #6
Knecht_Rupprecht
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Thanks all. I did the three weeks (less gracefully then I would have liked), but I was close to the temps I wanted and managed to hit my target OG.

 
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Old 01-14-2013, 01:20 PM   #7
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here's my problem. if i make a delicious beer with a step mash then i'm unwilling to try it with a single step, because i don't want it to be any different. so i may be wasting my time with the protein rest.

so there is something to be said for starting simple (single step) and then screwing around with the mash if you aren't happy with the product.
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Old 01-14-2013, 02:16 PM   #8
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Try and stick with the recipe as much as you can. To give you an example, I use BIAB and have done about 45 brews this way. I have never ruined a batch by being off my Mash schedule. I usually just mash in at 158 for most basic Ales and let it sit for 70 min. Sometimes I have had a 5-8C variation during my mash.

I can hit some great efficiencies. I use a single step infusion mash, as do most BIAB'ers. I rarely have done step mashes because for the styles I brew it doesn't seem to make that much of a difference. Dont worry...

Bottom line.... 152 for 60 and let er rip.
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