Homebrewer looking into winemaking - Home Brew Forums
Register Now For Free!

Home Brew Forums > Wine, Mead, Cider, Sake & Soda > Winemaking Forum > Homebrewer looking into winemaking

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 01-11-2013, 02:17 AM   #1
hobomilitia
Recipes 
 
Oct 2010
Baton Rouge, LA
Posts: 10


I'm sure this has been posted somewhere, but I have searched and am unable to find much info...

I've been homebrewing for a few years now, and am looking to branch out a bit and occasionally try winemaking. Firstly, I don't really need to buy a starter wine kit, since I already have most of the equipment, but is there anything else besides a corker that I would need? I have a 6 gal glass carboy and a few 5 gal plastic ones. Should i invest in some different racking tubes?

I am mostly into red wines, any recommendations on any solid, but easier kits? I'm not entirely familiar with the aging process with wine, but is there anything like that that would be ready in about 5 or 6 months? I know red wines tend to take more time than whites, but most sites that I look at kits don't have the fermentation/aging times like beer kits often do.

Thanks ahead for any links or info.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2013, 02:28 AM   #2
Ctayl9jq
Recipes 
 
Dec 2011
Henrico, Va
Posts: 78


Bump interested in this too

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2013, 02:33 AM   #3
cbmikey
Recipes 
 
Jan 2012
Lemoyne, OH
Posts: 110
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts


I am not an expert on this and I don't play one on TV. But head on over to Midwest Supplies and see what they have. There's a lot of q&a there and lots of info!

http://www.midwestsupplies.com/winem...ncentrate.html
__________________
->Mike
->Mr Beer Newb

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2013, 08:02 AM   #4
WVMJ
 
WVMJ's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Dec 2012
Karnage, WV
Posts: 1,531
Liked 182 Times on 166 Posts


On the plus side you already know what clean is, you know yeast are alive and you can measure stuff and follow a recipe. Winemaking is slower than making beer, real patience pays off. A kit is a good way to start learning how to make kit wine, bit if you want to know how to make wine start from scratch or at least from juices. Balancing acids seems to be the hardest thing for beer guys to get their head around since you dont do it for beermaking. Get a simple titration kit to measure it and some acid blend. We also use potassium metablisulfite powder, stay away from the camden, the powder is much more useful. A simple Welches concord from concentrate is a good practice wine. You can even add some oak to it WVMJ
__________________
Country Wines with WVMJ

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2013, 08:32 AM   #5
Clearcut23
Registered User
Recipes 
 
Sep 2012
Posts: 98
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts


I did a Pino Noir kit last February. Pretty self explanatory. Ferment for a month then Bottle. Aging doesn't really do anything since you clear it with chemicals before you bottle it. My advice is to use a bucket with a blow off tube. If you really wanted to you could ferment an extra month in secondary with oak chips. I tossed mine in during primary. Came out pretty good. I only have 4 bottles left

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2013, 01:39 AM   #6
hobomilitia
Recipes 
 
Oct 2010
Baton Rouge, LA
Posts: 10

When you say aging doesn't really do anything, does that mean that if I use a clarifying agent then it doesn't need to be aged? I was under the assumption that the balance of the tannins determines how long it needs to age. If so do you have to balance it in some certain manner to get it that way?

Thanks for all the good info though.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2013, 01:48 AM   #7
novalou
Recipes 
 
Jun 2012
Posts: 600
Liked 36 Times on 35 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by hobomilitia
When you say aging doesn't really do anything, does that mean that if I use a clarifying agent then it doesn't need to be aged? I was under the assumption that the balance of the tannins determines how long it needs to age. If so do you have to balance it in some certain manner to get it that way?

Thanks for all the good info though.
Aging doesn't do anything?? Take a bottle, stash it away for a year and try it, it does make a difference, clarified with chemicals or not.

Wines with large amounts of tannins do require more aging. After fermentation, wines do require "resting" where the flavor a all mellow out. Some are good after one month, some a year or more.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2013, 02:57 PM   #8
saramc
Recipes 
 
Feb 2011
suburb of Louisville, KY
Posts: 1,743
Liked 169 Times on 153 Posts


Hobo,
If you move into winemaking I would recommend investing in a pH meter. That way you can quickly and accurately determine your pH, but more importantly you can determine the TA when you incorporate the chemicals from TA test kit. It takes ALL the guess work out of it. If you plan to work with fruit, invest in a refractometer. And if you are serious about it, then a vacuum system like All-in-One will be your best friend, next to your hydrometer and its backup. There is nothing like vacuum racking, degassing and bottling--with no lifting of carboys required.
But in all reality when it comes to the making of the wine, making a wine from a kit is a good starting point, but in no way prepares you for working with raw ingredients. Kits go thru years of R&D, so it is simple and easy. But a basic understanding of terms and techniques is required if you want success. As to when that wine will be ready to drink that will be left to you. For me, I bulk age almost every wine, kit or non-kit, for a minimum of 12 months. My non-kit wines typically do not get exposed to fining agents because I find that time will naturally clear and degas a wine IF you do the right things up front.
__________________
Motto: quel che sara sara

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2013, 07:54 PM   #9
mikeslag
Recipes 
 
Oct 2012
Posts: 31
Liked 3 Times on 2 Posts


When Midwest had a groupon a while back I purchased a wine starter kit to get some additional equipment at a good price and it came with this

COASTAL RED (Red Burgundy) Wine Making Kit - Vintners Reserve

I really enjoyed it, nice and dry, dark as blood. Delicious.

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
New to winemaking hawkeyes Winemaking Forum 33 12-11-2012 05:58 PM
Winemaking for the Homebrewer pianobrew Winemaking Forum 2 10-31-2011 05:24 PM
winemaking mistakes? dusty1025 Winemaking Forum 17 12-10-2010 08:39 PM
Gift ideas - from homebrewer to a homebrewer kunstler General Beer Discussion 13 11-11-2009 10:18 PM
New to winemaking beginner08 Winemaking Forum 3 10-11-2008 06:28 PM


Forum Jump