lager frementation schedule and temp - Home Brew Forums

Register Now!
Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > lager frementation schedule and temp

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 01-08-2013, 03:24 PM   #1
allanyork
Recipes 
 
Jan 2013
Posts: 65


I am new to making beer. Do i bought a generic beer starter kit, and a Festa blonde lager kit. From all the reading ive been doing I understand that the instructions that come with the kit are not the best. So I was wondering what you guys thought about the temperature and the length of fermentation. I have access to a room with a temp of 15 degrees C. The yeast used is s-23 from fermentix. What's your thoughts?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 04:21 PM   #2
emmdubb23
Recipes 
 
Mar 2012
Jacksonville, Florida
Posts: 221
Liked 21 Times on 19 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by allanyork View Post
I am new to making beer. Do i bought a generic beer starter kit, and a Festa blonde lager kit. From all the reading ive been doing I understand that the instructions that come with the kit are not the best. So I was wondering what you guys thought about the temperature and the length of fermentation. I have access to a room with a temp of 15 degrees C. The yeast used is s-23 from fermentix. What's your thoughts?
If you have not already, Google John Palmer How to Brew. It is a book that has been published online. Great start for all your questions. I would not have started with a Lager myself.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 04:36 PM   #3
allanyork
Recipes 
 
Jan 2013
Posts: 65

Yeah, its a lot more difficult to brew lager from what I understand. And it takes longer. But my favorite beer is colson canadian and im trying to brew something similair. Any ideas anyone? Should i pitch the yeast in the primary for acouple hours then put the primary in 15 degrees for 3 weeks? Then transfer to final for another 3 weeks? Unfortunatly I cant lower the temperature more then that

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 05:25 PM   #4
Pie_Man
 
Pie_Man's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Aug 2011
Gainesville, FL
Posts: 1,369
Liked 138 Times on 130 Posts


First off, welcome to the forum. Typically kit instructions fail at their fermentation procedure recommendations. They usually give generic guidelines like, keep in primary for one week than transfer.

15C is fine, in fact, well within the 9-23C guidelines listed by Fermentis, http://www.fermentis.com/wp-content/...02/SFG_S23.pdf. Keep in mind that the guidelines are referring to the temperature of the beer, not the ambient temperature. Typically, fermentation raises the temperature of the beer a few degrees higher than the ambient temp. This is more pronounced with ales than with lagers in my experience. Still, you'll be in the yeast's temperature range.

You'll read in Palmer's online How To Brew about diacetyl rest for lagers. I would say to sample the beer as fermenation appears to be winding down. If you taste a buttery, diacetyl flavor, then do the diacetyl rest, if not, I would skip that step. I've heard several prominent homebrew figures like Jamil Z and Gordon Strong speak about not doing a diacetyl rest, I've also heard from good brewers in my homebrew club about this approach. I'm trying it myself for the first time with a doppelbock I have fermenting. Once fermentation is complete, for a lager, probably about 3-4 weeks, (once the gravity readings are stable over a period of several days), you can then cold crash, or move the beer into a secondary vessel if you want it to clear up and give the beer time to lager/bulk condition.

I hope this helps

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 06:16 PM   #5
allanyork
Recipes 
 
Jan 2013
Posts: 65

This does help thank you. I'll ferment in the primary at 15 degrees ambient temp for 3-4 weeks. Then transfer to a second vessell (glass carboy) for another 3 weeks? Then bottle for another 3 weeks? After bottled is it ok to have it in my apartment ie room temp?
This dicetyl rest, is that when you bring it to warmer temperatures for a day and then back to colder temp to continue to ferment? It takes some of the crappy taste out right
And settles the beer a little better?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pie_Man View Post
First off, welcome to the forum. Typically kit instructions fail at their fermentation procedure recommendations. They usually give generic guidelines like, keep in primary for one week than transfer.

15C is fine, in fact, well within the 9-23C guidelines listed by Fermentis, http://www.fermentis.com/wp-content/...02/SFG_S23.pdf. Keep in mind that the guidelines are referring to the temperature of the beer, not the ambient temperature. Typically, fermentation raises the temperature of the beer a few degrees higher than the ambient temp. This is more pronounced with ales than with lagers in my experience. Still, you'll be in the yeast's temperature range.

You'll read in Palmer's online How To Brew about diacetyl rest for lagers. I would say to sample the beer as fermenation appears to be winding down. If you taste a buttery, diacetyl flavor, then do the diacetyl rest, if not, I would skip that step. I've heard several prominent homebrew figures like Jamil Z and Gordon Strong speak about not doing a diacetyl rest, I've also heard from good brewers in my homebrew club about this approach. I'm trying it myself for the first time with a doppelbock I have fermenting. Once fermentation is complete, for a lager, probably about 3-4 weeks, (once the gravity readings are stable over a period of several days), you can then cold crash, or move the beer into a secondary vessel if you want it to clear up and give the beer time to lager/bulk condition.

I hope this helps

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 06:33 PM   #6
freisste
Recipes 
 
Sep 2012
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Posts: 2,538
Liked 344 Times on 276 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by allanyork
This does help thank you. I'll ferment in the primary at 15 degrees ambient temp for 3-4 weeks. Then transfer to a second vessell (glass carboy) for another 3 weeks? Then bottle for another 3 weeks? After bottled is it ok to have it in my apartment ie room temp?
This dicetyl rest, is that when you bring it to warmer temperatures for a day and then back to colder temp to continue to ferment? It takes some of the crappy taste out right
And settles the beer a little better?
After bottling, you should leave it in a dark space that is roughly 70f (20c, I think) so it can bottle condition.

And yes, your description of diacetyl rest is correct. Early in the fermentation, the yeast create diacetyl. Late in fermentation, the yeast will "clean up" diacetyl. Warming it at the end of the fermentation period promotes this cleanup. After the cleanup, you cool the beer down to lagering temperatures (basically as cold as you can get it without freezing).

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 06:51 PM   #7
Pie_Man
 
Pie_Man's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Aug 2011
Gainesville, FL
Posts: 1,369
Liked 138 Times on 130 Posts


Diacetyl is often described as a buttery or butterscotch flavor. It may also come across as slightly nutty or caramel like in low amounts. Diacetyl can also created a slickness to the beer.

You can do the diacetyl rest and that's fine, or if you don't taste it as fermentation is subsiding, you can forgo it according to the sources I listed in my previous post. There are other posts on this forum discussing the merits of the diacetyl rest if you're interested.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 07:22 PM   #8
allanyork
Recipes 
 
Jan 2013
Posts: 65

Ok thanks, ill have a look. I guess my lager, won't really be largered if im lagering it at the same temp that it was fermented at. Is there even any point to lager it then ? If its at the same temp? Or will the beer still benifit from it?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 07:33 PM   #9
Pie_Man
 
Pie_Man's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Aug 2011
Gainesville, FL
Posts: 1,369
Liked 138 Times on 130 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by allanyork View Post
Ok thanks, ill have a look. I guess my lager, won't really be largered if im lagering it at the same temp that it was fermented at. Is there even any point to lager it then ? If its at the same temp? Or will the beer still benifit from it?
While I've not done this myself, I would think there is still a benefit to letting the beer "lager" at the 15C temp. You may want to search the forum for "swamp cooler" as a way to decrease the temperature a little. It's basically placing your fermenter in a tub of water and adding bottles of ice to the water in order to lower the beer's temperature. That should get your beer at least a couple of degrees cooler.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 10:56 PM   #10
allanyork
Recipes 
 
Jan 2013
Posts: 65

Hmmmm. Interesting

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
First lager (oktoberfest)- Mash schedule and ferm temp? smittygouv30 All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 8 07-31-2012 02:38 PM
Planning a lager fermentation schedule with a new temp controller SolidBrewRider Fermentation & Yeast 7 07-05-2012 02:55 PM
Yeast frementation temp question StarCityBrewMaster Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 3 12-29-2010 09:34 PM
Lager Schedule/Temp Woes jake_up Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 3 11-16-2010 04:03 AM
Lager Carbonating - room temp or lager temp? DrJekyll-HomeBrew General Techniques 1 03-08-2010 03:03 AM


Forum Jump