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Old 01-08-2013, 04:20 PM   #11
birdroad
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Dec 2012
Miami, FL
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LOL @ "home defense item"
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Old 01-08-2013, 05:20 PM   #12
FermentNEthinG
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miker1529 View Post
Ya it has been a few days the rest of the bottles are fine I think it may of been a flaw. Or just the heat during the dish washers sanitation cycle .cracking it Because I remember my uncle who was a bottler in St. Louis at ab saying that today's bottles have a little plastic mixed into them.
As a former supervisor of a glass manufacturing facility that supplied AB their bottles, I can tell you for a fact glass doesn't have any plastic additives....How would polymers survive not getting vaporized in a glass tank? Most tanks are fired and maintained at around 2400 - 2600 degrees with a combination of natural gas and high voltage electricity.
Glass is made of Sand, soda ash, lime and saltpeter...Iron pyrites and other metals are added for color control. Cullet (aka recycled glass) is added to keep energy and costs of firing the tank down.
Glass will break because of defects in manufacturing, it happens. If you saved the bottle and took good pictures of it. I could tell you exactly where the bottle failed and if it indeed was a failure by defect. (Fracture & Failure Analysis) Most will pop at the "bottom match." That would be that faint circle on the bottom of the bottle. This is where the bottom plate of the mold rests and adds the the ridges on the bottom of a bottle for stability. (knurling) Too cold of a bottom plate on the machine causes this to crack around this faint circle. Leading to a eventual pressure fail. Heating and cooling of the bottle a couple of times could have been just enough to get it weak enough to fail.

When this would happen on AB's high speed bottle filler lines, this was a serious problem. They would hold the glass or ship it back for re select. When the broken samples arrived, all the offender bottles were found to be all created from a particular mold. (The number on the bottom of the bottle as well on the sidewall.)


Glass nerd rant over. Hope it doesn't happen too often to you!

 
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Old 01-08-2013, 05:38 PM   #13
jerrodm
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Sep 2012
Silver Spring, MD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davekippen View Post
I think sometimes bottles just have flaws. I had one short 12oz'r blow up spontaneously and none of the others had an issue.I chalked it up to a defective bottle. Im sure that not 100% of bottles are perfect. Would be interesting to hear from someone at a "real" brewery what kind of bottle fall-out they have.
This is my guess too--pressure wouldn't have had to be that high, if there was even a tiny flaw it could still blow. If you haven't had any other problems, chalk it up to this.
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Old 01-09-2013, 03:59 AM   #14
miker1529
 
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Dec 2012
Norfolk, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FermentNEthinG

As a former supervisor of a glass manufacturing facility that supplied AB their bottles, I can tell you for a fact glass doesn't have any plastic additives....How would polymers survive not getting vaporized in a glass tank? Most tanks are fired and maintained at around 2400 - 2600 degrees with a combination of natural gas and high voltage electricity.
Glass is made of Sand, soda ash, lime and saltpeter...Iron pyrites and other metals are added for color control. Cullet (aka recycled glass) is added to keep energy and costs of firing the tank down.
Glass will break because of defects in manufacturing, it happens. If you saved the bottle and took good pictures of it. I could tell you exactly where the bottle failed and if it indeed was a failure by defect. (Fracture & Failure Analysis) Most will pop at the "bottom match." That would be that faint circle on the bottom of the bottle. This is where the bottom plate of the mold rests and adds the the ridges on the bottom of a bottle for stability. (knurling) Too cold of a bottom plate on the machine causes this to crack around this faint circle. Leading to a eventual pressure fail. Heating and cooling of the bottle a couple of times could have been just enough to get it weak enough to fail.

When this would happen on AB's high speed bottle filler lines, this was a serious problem. They would hold the glass or ship it back for re select. When the broken samples arrived, all the offender bottles were found to be all created from a particular mold. (The number on the bottom of the bottle as well on the sidewall.)

Glass nerd rant over. Hope it doesn't happen too often to you!
Really how long ago. I ask because my father in law ( I mis typed earlier when I said uncle) was in St. Louis when in bev took over. If I remember correctly he told me one day not to long after that. That they started to get bottles from Mexico with a % of plastic in them .I do not know what size but I know he worked the 12 line sometimes and mainly worked the 44 and 22 oz line. In fact one day I went to his work for his retirement lunch there at the plant and I got to see a hsl get blocked by a broke bottle.

Is was wild ........ I say at least 200 12 oz bottles of bud lite where finished it was everywhere . Before they where able to stop the line .

My grandfather also worked for crown can and he made the caps before they went to twist offs that was years before my time.
But they closed his plant and he retired. Too

Sad that is why shortly after I was able to legally drink I left the beer that had employed both sides of my family because it was no longer us owned or in some cases us made or supplied.

 
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Old 01-09-2013, 05:47 PM   #15
FermentNEthinG
 
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Again, There is no way glass is manufactured with plastic. The intense heat of the glass process would destroy any chance the polymers had of doing their jobs. There isn't a stabilizer known to man that would allow a particular plastic to maintain it's properties when subjected to this kind of intense heat. The plastic would simply burn off completely and release into the atmosphere any time it would be poured into the tank.

 
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