When to move to secondary - Page 3 - Home Brew Forums
Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > When to move to secondary

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 01-03-2013, 08:09 AM   #21
bbell21
Recipes 
 
Dec 2012
Posts: 104
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts


I recently racked after 4 days of primary fermentation and let it sit in the carboy for 2 more weeks of secondary fermentation like the kit instructions said and the beer tasted great. The point behind it is to avoid autolysis which is known to produce off flavors. Also a benefit to racking early is that your brew is still producing co2 which helps reduce your risk of oxidation.

Others feel like it is a waste of time or considers it extremely too early to rack. Some think this isn't enough time for the yeast to clean up its byproducts and off flavors. It all comes down to personal preference.



 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2013, 08:57 AM   #22
Dan
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
Dan's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Oct 2010
Makakilo, Hawaii
Posts: 7,016
Liked 2167 Times on 1355 Posts


I don't agree with your method but truly respect your stance.



 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2013, 09:24 AM   #23
statu
Recipes 
 
Jun 2012
Escazu, Costa Rica
Posts: 322
Liked 14 Times on 7 Posts


I move most of mine to a secondary for a couple days to remove any sediment that I may have transferred over. There is no need to put it in a secondary. The big brewers don't. It's all about personal preference. The only wrong way is a undrinkable beer. If you get to the drinking stage and are happy then continue on!
__________________
People that like light beer don't like the taste of beer they just like to pee a lot!

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2013, 11:05 AM   #24
Calichusetts
Recipes 
 
Nov 2011
Plymouth, MA
Posts: 3,007
Liked 495 Times on 297 Posts


There is a lot of "no need" talk on this site about secondaries but if you want to use it go ahead. I do on all my beers. As one of the above posters mentioned, there is no real threat to oxidation or infection if you are careful. I usually wait 3-4 weeks and then cold crash the primary...transfer and dry hop for a week. I sometimes even cold crash the secondary. Hope this helps

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2013, 04:54 PM   #25
LoloMT7
Recipes 
 
Jan 2012
Missoula, Montana
Posts: 1,913
Liked 1268 Times on 679 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by statu View Post
The big brewers don't.
I move all my brews to secondary after FG is reached IF I am planning to bottle them. If I'm going to keg then I don't bother (the first and last glasses from the keg get rid of all the sediment anyways). I just don't like to hand out bottles to friends with a bunch of yeast sediment in the bottoms of them (they will pass gas and call you with a stomach ache...lol)

The tours I've been on and seen inside micro breweries they all transfer from the fermentors to "Bright tanks" (kind of like a secondary I believe) That is where they put the beer on CO2 and they age it and allow it to clear. The other thing the big brewers do is filter there beers (most of us homebrews don't as far as I can see)

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2013, 05:33 PM   #26
KeyWestBrewing
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Recipes 
 
Jan 2012
Key West, Florida
Posts: 6,017
Liked 713 Times on 557 Posts


I think the important thing the secondary users have all said is letting the beer finish up before moving it over. Let the beer finish and if you wanna move it over at that point go for it.
__________________
EAC - 5/2/14

Growing Hops in Key West, FL....

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f92/casc...y-west-333466/

Primary : Oak Aged Chocolate Stout
Primary : Atocha Amber
Primary : Smoked Porter
On Tap : Mosaic/7Cs APA, Cypress aged Chocolate Stout, Arnold Palmer Berliner Weisse, English Porter
On Deck : Jackfruit Hefeweizen, Pink Lemon Wit

*Member: The HBT Sweaty Fat Guys Cigar club

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2013, 08:00 PM   #27
LoloMT7
Recipes 
 
Jan 2012
Missoula, Montana
Posts: 1,913
Liked 1268 Times on 679 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by KeyWestBrewing View Post
I think the important thing the secondary users have all said is letting the beer finish up before moving it over. Let the beer finish and if you wanna move it over at that point go for it.
+1 enough time in primary is definitely important. Sanitize good for your transfers and try not to splash in the transfer. Good Luck

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2013, 11:21 PM   #28
GASoline71
Recipes 
 
Dec 2011
Oak Harbor (Whidbey Island), WA
Posts: 608
Liked 70 Times on 59 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by CiscoKid View Post
I am a lazy brewer: I go straight from primary to kegs. I put the kegs on CO2 and let them sit for a couple of weeks. First glass pretty much takes care of any trub that settled in the keg.
THIS...

Gary
__________________
GREEN TRUCK BREWING CO.

"Brewed Fresh from the North End of Puget Sound"

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2013, 02:20 AM   #29
homebrewdad
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
homebrewdad's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jan 2012
Birmingham, AL
Posts: 3,271
Liked 384 Times on 279 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by bbell21 View Post
The point behind it is to avoid autolysis which is known to produce off flavors.
This is a boogeyman that no longer exists on the typical homebrew scale. Even Palmer has done a complete 180 on this issue.

I have tried both methods, and I personally secondary every beer - I like the security blanket of ensuring less trub in my bottling bucket. For the record, I'm one of those "slow" brewers; I tend to primary for 3-4 weeks, then secondary for anywhere from a week to a few months (for big beers).
__________________
Check out the priming sugar calculator, yeast starter calculator, and the beer calorie calculator.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2013, 10:55 AM   #30
bbell21
Recipes 
 
Dec 2012
Posts: 104
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts


Only difficulty with waiting for your brew to completely ferment is that your risk oxidation. Idk what setup he has but I don't use a liter or so of my wort because I don't want the nasty looking trub at the bottom of my cook getting in my primary so my carboy always has a little more open space for oxygen than normal.... racking a tad early (before fermentation is complete) will reduce this risk because your brew will still be producing enough co2 to push all of the oxygen out. It will finish fermentation in the secondary hence "secondary fermentation". My FG was suppose to be 1.010-1.015 and I racked at 1.007...it will develop another small yeast cake in the secondary...but you should of seen all the crap I left behind in the primary! Don't want that in my brew! Haha. Like I said it all depends on who you talk too.



 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
When to move to secondary? ilv4xn Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 30 07-05-2012 06:20 PM
Too soon to move to secondary? psuicers Fermentation & Yeast 4 02-25-2011 09:40 AM
Move to secondary? bizybrewer Fermentation & Yeast 11 10-28-2010 08:14 PM
When to move to secondary? B192734 Mead Forum 3 03-18-2010 06:56 AM
When can I move to Secondary.... brewagentjay Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 14 02-07-2010 03:57 AM


Forum Jump