Lovibond Rating (or Plato. Not sure) - Home Brew Forums

Register Now!
Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Beer Discussion > Lovibond Rating (or Plato. Not sure)

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 01-02-2013, 02:20 PM   #1
Lepke
Recipes 
 
Jul 2012
Posts: 10


I'm wanting to attempt to make a few beer styles that have fallen out of popularity in the past hundred years or so, or which are extinct aside from a recipe or two still being available.

One of them calls for 2 pounds of acidulated malt with an L of 2. I think they mean 2L as in Lovibond and not Plato, so if I'm wrong by all means let me know.

So far I have found this with a 1.8L and 3L rating.

My question is; does this make that much of a difference? If so I will keep looking. I'd like to get it as close to the style as possible otherwise there's no sense in doing this.

Also, is there away to compensate the 1.8L to 2L. Or conversely the 3L to 2L?

Here is the link from BYO in case this helps.

http://www.byo.com/stories/beer-styl...-style-profile



Thanks all!
Ken~

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2013, 02:28 PM   #2
cluckk
 
cluckk's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Apr 2005
San Antonio, TX
Posts: 1,599
Liked 360 Times on 230 Posts


Lovibond is a color rating and it is easier to put color in than to take it out. Use the 1.8 and then you could boil longer. You could also check your water too and compare to the water where the style was brewed. Some additions to water can increase or decrease the extraction of color from the grain. It may be possible to make additions to your water that will make the brew darker than theirs would have.
__________________
"So you say you just brewed your first batch of beer. Welcome to the obsession." --me, to every first time brewer I ever meet.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2013, 02:33 PM   #3
causeimthesquid
Recipes 
 
Mar 2011
Merrimack, New Hampshire
Posts: 152
Liked 23 Times on 20 Posts


Unless the rest of your grain bill is pilsner malt, I wouldn't worry about 1.2L If you add any crystal malts or toasty specialty grains, those will be suspect for color discrepencies.

Plus, you said you were doing historical beers, which depending on how far back you are going, were no where near as light or clear as today's pilsners just due to the malting and kilning process.

I wouldn't worry about it.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2013, 02:35 PM   #4
WoodlandBrew
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
WoodlandBrew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Oct 2012
Malden, MA
Posts: 2,191
Liked 244 Times on 199 Posts


That is likely Lovibond which is a measure of color. There are many more factors that will impact the best more than the slight difference in roastiness that the difference in color indicates. so I wouldn't sweat it. The malt available today is very different than that available a century ago, so I wouldn't sweat the Lovibond being 10% different.

EDIT:
That's an interesting article. Is it really 2 lbs of acidulated malt? 1% or 2% of the grist is normal, and maybe I missed it when I skimmed it, but it didn't sound that sour. The Pilsner malt was listed as "about 2L" and the Munich is listed as "between 6L and 20L." If that's what you are referring to then like was said, don't worry about the 2L being 1.8L.
__________________
The 2nd edition is now available: Brewing Engineering
Woodland Brewing Research Blog Applied Science for Better Beer.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-02-2013, 07:38 PM   #5
mikeho
Recipes 
 
Apr 2010
Boston
Posts: 135
Liked 13 Times on 11 Posts


Maybe the link is wrong, but I didn't see any acidulated malt in that recipe. The grain bill is "70/30 mix of Pils and Munich malt", no room in there for 2 lbs of acidulated malt.
__________________
Primary: Simcoe APA, Smoked Porter
Bottled: Brown Ale, Imperial Red, Simcoe/Columbus APA, Breakfast Stout, Barleywine

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2013, 12:29 AM   #6
Rideandbrew
Recipes 
 
Sep 2012
Chicagoland, Illinois
Posts: 55
Liked 9 Times on 8 Posts


Continental Pils, and Munich 10.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2013, 07:41 AM   #7
patto1ro
Recipes 
 
Apr 2005
Posts: 252
Liked 37 Times on 26 Posts


That article is wrong about Dampfbier. It isn't feremneted with a Weizen yeast. I've been to the brewery and asked the brewer. It's just a neutral top-fermenting strain. The beer itself is like a lightly-hopped Alt.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2013, 01:03 PM   #8
Lepke
Recipes 
 
Jul 2012
Posts: 10

Sorry. Meant to put this link in there. Not the other one. That one is for later. :-) http://byo.com/stories/recipeindex/a...beer/2429-gose

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-03-2013, 03:30 PM   #9
mikeho
Recipes 
 
Apr 2010
Boston
Posts: 135
Liked 13 Times on 11 Posts


So it turns out that the gose style has experienced a small resurgence in popularity. Sam Adams makes Verloren, which is limited release, but you may be able to find some. Also, a gose took gold in the Category 23 in the Boston Homebrew Comp in 2012.
__________________
Primary: Simcoe APA, Smoked Porter
Bottled: Brown Ale, Imperial Red, Simcoe/Columbus APA, Breakfast Stout, Barleywine

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
37 Plato OG (1.164) tmains All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 11 04-29-2012 09:20 PM
Plato question 3sheetsEMJ General Beer Discussion 4 02-17-2012 11:08 PM
calculating plato indianaroller General Beer Discussion 3 09-17-2011 03:19 AM
Plato coincidences jlaureanti Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 2 05-05-2011 04:57 AM
Why don't we use deg Plato for gravities Kaiser General Techniques 29 03-23-2009 02:01 PM


Forum Jump