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Old 12-30-2012, 09:20 PM   #1
sweenc
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Jul 2012
Pittsburgh, PA - Pennsylvania
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I just finished my second brew. Can the cold break by thrown down the drain? I have a disposal in my kitchen sink, which is where said disposal would happen.

Thanks

 
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Old 12-30-2012, 09:51 PM   #2
brewkinger
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If by cold break, you mean the collection of "stuff" at the bottom of your brew kettle after the boil, this is actually a collection of hot break, hop residue and cold break all together.

Having said that, it can certainly be disposed of down the drain. I brew outside and all my initial cleaning occurs outside because of this.

I suspect that it actually benefits rural people like myself that have a septic tank and leach field. THe yeast must have something down there to munch on!!
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Old 01-01-2013, 04:51 PM   #3
sweenc
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Jul 2012
Pittsburgh, PA - Pennsylvania
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brewkinger
If by cold break, you mean the collection of "stuff" at the bottom of your brew kettle after the boil, this is actually a collection of hot break, hop residue and cold break all together.

Having said that, it can certainly be disposed of down the drain. I brew outside and all my initial cleaning occurs outside because of this.

I suspect that it actually benefits rural people like myself that have a septic tank and leach field. THe yeast must have something down there to munch on!!
Thanks! I thought it was cold break because it doesn't actually settle until the wort is chilled. Either way I appreciate the help.

This is my second brew with the first being an IPA which turned out beautifully.

On a completely unrelated note, my basement is very cold and I'm trying to brew a red ale, but I am concerned because fermentation has yet to start from late two days ago. Is it salvageable? Current temp is right around 58F

Thank you for any help you can provide on that.

 
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Old 01-01-2013, 05:12 PM   #4
menerdari
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All that stuff collectively is called trub. I send it down my disposal every time I brew. same with the trub from my fermenter.
58F might be a bit on the cold side depending on yeast strain.
The temp may delay fermentation or stall it completely.
Is your fermenter on the floor? If it is put it up higher and that may make all the difference.
Worst case, fermentation doesn't start. simply move it some place warmer and/or shake it up a bit. It certainly isn't ruined.

 
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Old 01-01-2013, 05:16 PM   #5
chessking
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Oct 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweenc View Post
This is my second brew with the first being an IPA which turned out beautifully.

On a completely unrelated note, my basement is very cold and I'm trying to brew a red ale, but I am concerned because fermentation has yet to start from late two days ago. Is it salvageable? Current temp is right around 58F
58F is a bit cool for ale yeast, but nothing devastating. You could warm it up some and that would invigorate the yeast. With the temperatures you are at now you would expect the yeast to be slower in starting. Its working, you just cant see it yet.

Was your IPA fermented at the same temps? If so, It turned out "beautifully".

Just remember at lower ferment temperatures it will take longer for fermentation to finish. You might even consider warming it up towards the end of active fermentation to keep the yeast interested to the finish.

 
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Old 01-01-2013, 05:50 PM   #6
sweenc
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Jul 2012
Pittsburgh, PA - Pennsylvania
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chessking

58F is a bit cool for ale yeast, but nothing devastating. You could warm it up some and that would invigorate the yeast. With the temperatures you are at now you would expect the yeast to be slower in starting. Its working, you just cant see it yet.

Was your IPA fermented at the same temps? If so, It turned out "beautifully".

Just remember at lower ferment temperatures it will take longer for fermentation to finish. You might even consider warming it up towards the end of active fermentation to keep the yeast interested to the finish.
Thank you! I have it wrapped in four towels now and it is elevated on two plastic bins in the boiler room, near the boiler. The temperature has increased by a lot since I set it up like this yesterday, and I believe it will continue to rise.

I live in PA and brewed the IPA in July/August so the basement was a nice 68-72F throughout fermentation.

I guess I'll just keep an eye on it. At what point should I think about pitching more yeast?

 
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Old 01-01-2013, 06:30 PM   #7
chessking
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Oct 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweenc View Post
Thank you! I have it wrapped in four towels now and it is elevated on two plastic bins in the boiler room, near the boiler. The temperature has increased by a lot since I set it up like this yesterday, and I believe it will continue to rise.

I live in PA and brewed the IPA in July/August so the basement was a nice 68-72F throughout fermentation.

I guess I'll just keep an eye on it. At what point should I think about pitching more yeast?
Be careful not to warm it up too much. You still want to ferment at the cool end of the yeast tolerance to prevent excess ester production. If I remember correctly, this is your second brew? Best advice I can give you is be patient, get the yeast happy, and leave it alone for two to three weeks.

If after warming and swirling you don't see any activity in a week then maybe consider re pitching. But you should be fine. Yeast want desperately to make beer, and they usually succeed in spite of our failings.

 
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