Coldbreak Brewing Giveaway - Open to All!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Adjusting pH of Strike Water?
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 09-02-2007, 02:19 AM   #1
left field brewer
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Lansing, MI
Posts: 94
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default Adjusting pH of Strike Water?

I've seen a couple of conflicting opinions about whether pH should be adjusted before dough-in. The pH of local city water is about or above 9 and has a fair amount of alkalinity to it. A couple of people at respectable supply stores(one is a brewery too) , said that reducing pH prior to dough-in to under 7 will help reduce the hop harshness especially in young beers. Has anyone else heard this? The two people seemed pretty damn sure it improved their homebrew.Anybody experienced brewing with pretty high pH? I know that much of that will mellow in time but seriously, if I can have smoother beers faster just by a little addition, of course I'd do it.


left field brewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2007, 12:29 PM   #2
Brew-boy
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Brew-boy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Lapeer, Michigan
Posts: 2,415
Liked 14 Times on 11 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Ph of the mash should be adjusted first. Then you should use acid to bring your strike water down to a Ph of around 6.


__________________
Next:Smoked Pilsner.
Primary:Belgian Red, American Stout w/Roeselare
On Tap:Pale Ale, English Bitter
Aging: Imperial Oatmeal Stout on Vanilla beans.

I rather owe you a dollar than cheat you out of it.."Dad"

http://lapeerareabrewers.com/

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/LapeerAreaBrewers/
Brew-boy is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2007, 01:07 PM   #3
Blender
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Blender's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Santa Cruz, CA.
Posts: 3,116
Liked 6 Times on 4 Posts

Default

Your water is pretty high at Ph 9. Why not try some 5.2 stabilizer in your next batch and see if it makes a taste difference.
http://www.fivestarchemicals.com/tech/fivetwo.pdf
__________________
Gary
Blender is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2007, 01:25 PM   #4
BigEd
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 2,439
Liked 135 Times on 118 Posts
Likes Given: 23

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by left field brewer
I've seen a couple of conflicting opinions about whether pH should be adjusted before dough-in. The pH of local city water is about or above 9 and has a fair amount of alkalinity to it. A couple of people at respectable supply stores(one is a brewery too) , said that reducing pH prior to dough-in to under 7 will help reduce the hop harshness especially in young beers. Has anyone else heard this? The two people seemed pretty damn sure it improved their homebrew.Anybody experienced brewing with pretty high pH? I know that much of that will mellow in time but seriously, if I can have smoother beers faster just by a little addition, of course I'd do it.
Do not confuse your water pH with the pH of the mash. It is not the pH of the brewing water but it's residual alkalinity that is important. This factor and the activity of the mash will determine the pH level reached and will let you know what additions you may need to reach the optimum mash pH range. Get a water report that shows the important brewing ions and the bicarbonate/alkalinity level of the water. You can check out the link below for a start on some water info.

http://www.allaboutbeer.com/homebr ... ater3.html
BigEd is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2007, 01:54 PM   #5
desertbronze
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 385
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

More info from John Palmer:

http://www.beertown.org/events/hbc/p...esentation.pdf

Read through this presentation - Palmer notes that the mash pH is the important consideration - water pH is not as important.
desertbronze is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2007, 02:24 PM   #6
Thalon
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Thalon's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: St. Louis Park, MN
Posts: 365
Default

Wow those are great links, thanks! I like Palmer's nomographs, though they're easiest used when printed out. Any idea where we can find some nomographs without the example data on them, blank forms we can print out and use ourselves?
Thalon is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2007, 02:32 PM   #7
FlyGuy
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
FlyGuy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Posts: 3,618
Liked 151 Times on 43 Posts
Likes Given: 7

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Thalon
Wow those are great links, thanks! I like Palmer's nomographs, though they're easiest used when printed out. Any idea where we can find some nomographs without the example data on them, blank forms we can print out and use ourselves?
Yep, try here:
http://www.howtobrew.com/images/f83.pdf
FlyGuy is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2007, 02:46 PM   #8
Thalon
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Thalon's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: St. Louis Park, MN
Posts: 365
Default

MMMMMMM Thank you!!!!
Thalon is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2007, 04:03 PM   #9
Got Trub?
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Washington State
Posts: 1,538
Liked 7 Times on 5 Posts

Default

You can also calculate it if you have your water analysis. The equation is:

Mash pH = 5.8 + (0.028*((CaCO3*0.056) - (Ca++ * 0.04) - (Mg+*0.033))) - (%dark malt)/40

5.8 is pH of distilled water (do not substitue your water pH)
Concentrations are in ppm
The pH change by dark malt is an approximation based on results published in Ray Daniels book

Again to re-iterate what has been posted above it is not your waters pH that dictates your mash pH but rather the constituents in your water and the amount of dark grain in your mash. As you can see from the equation your waters pH is not a component.

In terms of hop harshness your water definitely will affect that. It is for that reason that Burton on Trent is famous for its IPA's. It's their water.
Got Trub? is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2007, 07:18 PM   #10
ajf
Senior Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
ajf's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Long Island
Posts: 4,643
Liked 102 Times on 96 Posts
Likes Given: 39

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Got Trub?
5.8 is pH of distilled water
Minor correction. 5.8 is the typical pH of a mash containing only pale malt made with distilled water.

-a.


ajf is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
IPA water recipe - adjusting high bicarbonate water conpewter Brew Science 19 10-01-2010 05:29 PM
Strike water temp blowmax10 All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 5 07-26-2009 04:22 PM
strike water too hot? cap1 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 5 12-05-2008 03:11 AM
Strike Water Temperature Brett3rThanU All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 22 11-19-2008 03:40 AM
Strike Water hopsalot All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 8 05-18-2008 05:39 PM


Forum Jump

Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS