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Old 12-22-2012, 03:45 AM   #31
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We are close to $0.07/ KWH in MN.


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Old 12-23-2012, 12:46 AM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goybar View Post
wow, you guys pay a lot for electricity!!!

Last bill $0.074380/kwh
You have no idea...


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Old 12-23-2012, 01:13 AM   #33
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I actually have an Electricity Delivery Charge plus an Electricity Supply Charge...

If I add up and divide by kwh used it comes up to $0.1461/kwh.

974kwh = $142.30

Your clearly still more, but not as dramatically as it at first seemed, unless of course you have Delivery Charges on top that.

Chris
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Old 12-23-2012, 04:55 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goybar View Post
I actually have an Electricity Delivery Charge plus an Electricity Supply Charge...

If I add up and divide by kwh used it comes up to $0.1461/kwh.

974kwh = $142.30

Your clearly still more, but not as dramatically as it at first seemed, unless of course you have Delivery Charges on top that.

Chris
Not included in this pic is the delivery charge etc. I'll have to look a little closer. I didn't include that as I figure that is not anything additional. I was simply looking at the additional marginal cost if you will. Which by the way, you can see the higher tiers are crazy.
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Old 12-27-2012, 07:16 PM   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mateomtb View Post
The pennies difference on actual energy costs are of no real significance, the time and convenience factor are the savings. My current number for the cost of my time is $200 per hour when deciding on how to use it. If I have to spend a half hour getting a propane tank filled, I just spent $100 not to mention gasoline and whatever other errand my wife will sneak in on me :-). Having plenty of electric power to heat up my gear whenever I want in the comfort of my shop in a fraction of the time it takes on a burner in my driveway has been well worth the money I spent building it. I now have extra time to spend on other activities, it was a no brainer for me.

I can't believe people are trying to figure out how much heat they are loosing through their power cords. That's some heavy ****. lol
At $200/hr, I am guessing the time value of the beer you are brewing pushes your cost per beer out of this world...ha ha.

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Old 12-27-2012, 07:52 PM   #36
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So as promised I did a brew yesterday and was pretty methodical about collecting what I thought was relevant data.

I have tried to post a pic of the excel spreadsheet below. In summary I used approximately 74,633 BTU's with my set-up. The set-up being a 10.5 gallon Polarware Kettle and a Blichmann Floor Burner. Couple of key points:

Time to heat 8 gallons of water from 59* to 160* = 29 min
Time to Heat 8 gallons from 152* to 166* = 11 min
Time to Heat and Boil ~6.75 gal for 60 min, took 80 min, raised temp from 162*

A pound of propane = 21,951 BTU's. If I leave out the boil portion for just a moment and simply calculate energy used to raise temp from point A to point B, I think I can come up with some efficiency numbers. A quick refresher. 1 BTU = energy used to raise 1 gallon of water 1* F. 1 gallon = 8.34#. Therefore, 8 gallons of water x 8.34 = 66.7#. If I do the math for the heating of strike water and mash out water, in a 100% efficient system you would only use 7,670 BTU's. Based on the weight of the tank before and after, I used 1.6# = 35,122 BTU's. Thus, heating with Propane is 21.8% efficient, right? I am pretty sure my math is correct.

So here is the comparison:

Propane @ 3.57/gallon = $2.93 for this brew
NG = $0.90 (assuming same efficiency + 15% for difference between LP and NG)
Electricity = $0.80 (using some very loose estimations)

In the end, assuming some of my estimations are correct, due to heat loss as many suggested, going all electric can save (in my case) almost $2.10 per 5 gallon batch. Needless, to say, breakeven is a ways off. However, as some suggested the bling factor alone will more than cover the cost.

Thanks to all who chimed in on this. I hope it was a bit of fun to think of our brew days in yet another way.

Cheers!


Admittedly in order to do a apples to apples comparison, I would need to conduct same experiment with an electric element.

Reason: Cannot seem to get excel into the post - sorry
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Old 12-27-2012, 08:01 PM   #37
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Very unscientifically, I've found it costs me $3per 5gallon batch of propane. Since I bank my yeast and buy grain and hops in bulk, an average medium beer costs me under $15 to brew.

Bottling or kegging works out to about the same price (co2 vs caps and sugar).

I'm under .30 a bottle for most brews. I'm happy with that.

I have considered going electric, but right now isn't the best time for me. Thanks to everyone's contributions on this thread!
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Old 12-27-2012, 08:21 PM   #38
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Holy nerd alert!

I like it. Gonna have to take some time to read through this later.
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Old 12-27-2012, 11:04 PM   #39
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OP delivers! What efficiency did you assume for electric?
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Old 12-27-2012, 11:48 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jps101 View Post
So as promised I did a brew yesterday and was pretty methodical about collecting what I thought was relevant data.

I have tried to post a pic of the excel spreadsheet below. In summary I used approximately 74,633 BTU's with my set-up. The set-up being a 10.5 gallon Polarware Kettle and a Blichmann Floor Burner. Couple of key points:

Time to heat 8 gallons of water from 59* to 160* = 29 min
Time to Heat 8 gallons from 152* to 166* = 11 min
Time to Heat and Boil ~6.75 gal for 60 min, took 80 min, raised temp from 162*

A pound of propane = 21,951 BTU's. If I leave out the boil portion for just a moment and simply calculate energy used to raise temp from point A to point B, I think I can come up with some efficiency numbers. A quick refresher. 1 BTU = energy used to raise 1 gallon of water 1* F. 1 gallon = 8.34#. Therefore, 8 gallons of water x 8.34 = 66.7#. If I do the math for the heating of strike water and mash out water, in a 100% efficient system you would only use 7,670 BTU's. Based on the weight of the tank before and after, I used 1.6# = 35,122 BTU's. Thus, heating with Propane is 21.8% efficient, right? I am pretty sure my math is correct.

So here is the comparison:

Propane @ 3.57/gallon = $2.93 for this brew
NG = $0.90 (assuming same efficiency + 15% for difference between LP and NG)
Electricity = $0.80 (using some very loose estimations)

In the end, assuming some of my estimations are correct, due to heat loss as many suggested, going all electric can save (in my case) almost $2.10 per 5 gallon batch. Needless, to say, breakeven is a ways off. However, as some suggested the bling factor alone will more than cover the cost.

Thanks to all who chimed in on this. I hope it was a bit of fun to think of our brew days in yet another way.

Cheers!


Admittedly in order to do a apples to apples comparison, I would need to conduct same experiment with an electric element.
Spreadsheet



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