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Old 12-17-2012, 02:56 AM   #1
ryno1ryno
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I am just wondering if, in general, do most Americans have unexperienced beer palates? We are so accustomed to Buds, Coors and Miller Lites that anytime we drink a European beer or IPA with a full body, the initial taste reaction is unexpected.

Does an American need to learn how to drink world wide beers with unique taste profiles?

 
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Old 12-17-2012, 03:01 AM   #2
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No. American beer is arguably the best in the world, and we certainly make the best IPAs. Europeans drink plenty of mediocre beer as well (Beck's, Stella Artois, etc.).

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Old 12-17-2012, 03:06 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by McGarnigle View Post
No. American beer is arguably the best in the world, and we certainly make the best IPAs. Europeans drink plenty of mediocre beer as well (Beck's, Stella Artois, etc.).
Those two examples were originally pretty good examples of pilseners. Wasn't it InBev on your side of the pond that turned them into sh!te?

 
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Old 12-17-2012, 03:11 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ryno1ryno View Post
I am just wondering if, in general, do most Americans have unexperienced beer palates? We are so accustomed to Buds, Coors and Miller Lites that anytime we drink a European beer or IPA with a full body, the initial taste reaction is unexpected.

Does an American need to learn how to drink world wide beers with unique taste profiles?
Not necessarily, but what harm could it do?? The more you expose yourself to, the more possibilities you open up for yourself. The same can pretty much be said for the majority of people in any other country in the world, too.

 
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Old 12-17-2012, 03:12 AM   #5
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i had to learn this from moving to Europe for 2 years, left the U.S. drinking nothing but coors, came back and never touched a coors. At first the beer in, lets say germany, was quite different then it grew on me. Now thats all i drink and homebrew of course

 
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Old 12-17-2012, 03:14 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ogri View Post
Those two examples were originally pretty good examples of pilseners. Wasn't it InBev on your side of the pond that turned them into sh!te?
Maybe, but InBev was formed by the merger of Belgian and Brazilian companies.

 
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Old 12-17-2012, 03:17 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by McGarnigle View Post
Maybe, but InBev was formed by the merger of Belgian and Brazilian companies.
It's so hard to be a Nationalist or even an anti-Nationalist in this post-modern world....
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Old 12-17-2012, 03:18 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ryno1ryno View Post
Does an American need to learn how to drink world wide beers with unique taste profiles?

No. Why should anyone do that? If they try something and don't like it why try to "learn" to like it?

I don't like coconut. Why the h*ll would want to learn to like it?
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Old 12-17-2012, 03:19 AM   #9
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I wouldn't be shocked if people all over the world drink pretty much the same stuff, even if the major brewer is different. I'm pretty sure you'll find anywhere you go it's either AB-Inbev, Molson/MillerCoors/SABMiller/whatever it's called now, Diaego, Carlsberg, and I'm sure there's some conglomerate owning the bigger Asian breweries.
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Old 12-17-2012, 03:26 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by McGarnigle View Post
Maybe, but InBev was formed by the merger of Belgian and Brazilian companies.
Sorry, I should have said Anheuser-Busch InBev. But yes, you are right.

 
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