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Old 12-15-2012, 11:31 AM   #1
failbeams
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I plan on designing a quantitative assay to profile various wild ales (lambic, gueuze, flander's red and brown). I plan on testing ethyl acetate, acetic acid, and total volatile acids. I am also looking into additional compounds to add to the assay (depending on the ease/cost of creating a quantitative test for them). What are some characteristic compounds that you would like to see added? So far I have only looked into Isoamylacetate and a few phenols, but no sure-fire test methods yet...


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Old 12-15-2012, 01:10 PM   #2
bradjoiner
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I dont know if it can be tested but I love the Butyric acid in Geuze



 
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Old 12-15-2012, 01:17 PM   #3
cheezydemon3
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Your thread was so wildly successful, it spawned a copy of itself.

 
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Old 12-15-2012, 09:29 PM   #4
failbeams
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheezydemon3 View Post
Your thread was so wildly successful, it spawned a copy of itself.
ya thats my fault... i was going for maximum penetration lol


looking into butyric acid now. thanks for the suggestion!
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Old 12-17-2012, 04:10 AM   #5
Crayfish
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What about an assay for species of yeast and bacteria? What would be really neat would be a qPCR assay at different time points during fermentation and conditioning to see how proportions species shift during development.

 
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Old 12-17-2012, 08:05 AM   #6
failbeams
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Originally Posted by Crayfish View Post
What about an assay for species of yeast and bacteria? What would be really neat would be a qPCR assay at different time points during fermentation and conditioning to see how proportions species shift during development.
you've figured out part 2 already!

After the profiling is done I will be using the assay with qPCR to study population dynamics and gene expression is a few different mixed cultures.
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Old 12-17-2012, 10:50 PM   #7
Crayfish
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If you don't mind me asking, is this part of work for a graduate program or do you work in a lab? Or, are you just very rich and inquisitive?

 
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Old 12-17-2012, 11:49 PM   #8
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Is this volatile compound assay going to be on a mass spec? It does sound like you are looking for a grad school project. The proteomics and metabolomics core at my school has loads of collaborations with our local breweries.
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Old 12-23-2012, 11:36 PM   #9
failbeams
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If you don't mind me asking, is this part of work for a graduate program or do you work in a lab? Or, are you just very rich and inquisitive?
Its for a grad school thesis. Inquisitive, yes. Rich, not so much.
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Old 12-23-2012, 11:38 PM   #10
failbeams
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Originally Posted by ColoHox View Post
Is this volatile compound assay going to be on a mass spec? It does sound like you are looking for a grad school project. The proteomics and metabolomics core at my school has loads of collaborations with our local breweries.
They want to avoid using the mass spec because they have a limited number of columns (all being used). I am talking with a few companies about making a biolog type test or a custom ELISA assay. Will hear back in a week or so


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