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Old 12-13-2012, 01:15 AM   #21
germanmade84
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I just tryed a sample after 12 days in bottle.........it needs 6 months or so i agree. It tastes more like a belgian yeasted barley wine. I guess it should the abv is almost 12%! Im starting a post off this situation.

 
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Old 12-13-2012, 02:45 AM   #22
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How long did you ferment it? If ot did not spend a lot of time in the fermenter then it will need plenty of time in the bottles.

Also a beer like that will need a couple of months in the bottles to get good. Set it aside and forget about it for a few months.

 
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Old 12-13-2012, 06:12 AM   #23
TAPPAR
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So can you guys elaborate more what flavors candi syrup, medium and dark candi sugar will impart?

Also, if you take a recipe with (pulling numbers out of the air) 6 lbs of amber malt extract and brew it along side a recipe with 6lbs of amber malt extract and 1 lb of white sugar, the second recipe will be drier? I don't see how adding the extra lb of sugar will give the beer less body and make more of the amber extract ferment out unless I am missing something (which I very well may be)

Thanks!

 
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Old 12-13-2012, 02:47 PM   #24
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Dry is relative, not absolute.

Assuming sugar ferments completely, it becomes pure alcohol which is less dense than water (or finished beer), making the overall product less dense...but this effect is fairly small. Maybe you finish a point or two lower. The real shift is in the relative proportion of residual sugar / alcohol / density etc...boosting perceived dryness. That is to say, two beers with the same FG could be very different in terms of perceived dryness.

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Old 12-13-2012, 06:18 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TAPPAR View Post
Also, if you take a recipe with (pulling numbers out of the air) 6 lbs of amber malt extract and brew it along side a recipe with 6lbs of amber malt extract and 1 lb of white sugar, the second recipe will be drier?
No.

This is commonly implied here, but not true. To make the beer drier, you'd need to drop a pound of amber malt (5# total) and REPLACE it with 1# of sugar in order to dry out the end result. (That's because amber extract generally has some crystal malt in it and other things that are less fermentable than plain sugar... plus you generally don't know the mash temp used to produce the extract, which may play a role as well.) Sugar being almost completely fermentable, it will drop your FG compared to the original recipe.. and supposedly that produces a "drier" beer, but that's a whole different thread.
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Old 12-13-2012, 06:23 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piratwolf View Post
No.

This is commonly implied here, but not true. To make the beer drier, you'd need to drop a pound of amber malt (5# total) and REPLACE it with 1# of sugar in order to dry out the end result. (That's because amber extract generally has some crystal malt in it and other things that are less fermentable than plain sugar... plus you generally don't know the mash temp used to produce the extract, which may play a role as well.) Sugar being almost completely fermentable, it will drop your FG compared to the original recipe.. and supposedly that produces a "drier" beer, but that's a whole different thread.
Scale of dryness:
5 lbs DME < 5 lbs DME + 1 lb sugar << 4 lbs DME + 1 lb Sugar

Again, it's a relative thing. So in the case of 5 lbs + 1 lb, you're essentially just adding pure alcohol, which would boost perceived dryness, even if FG is relatively unchanged.

 
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Old 12-13-2012, 06:31 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TyTanium View Post
Scale of dryness:
5 lbs DME < 5 lbs DME + 1 lb sugar << 4 lbs DME + 1 lb Sugar

Again, it's a relative thing. So in the case of 5 lbs + 1 lb, you're essentially just adding pure alcohol, which would boost perceived dryness, even if FG is relatively unchanged.
A more complete answer. Good point!
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Old 12-14-2012, 12:33 AM   #28
germanmade84
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So what really happens over 6 months in a bottle that improves the taste?

 
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Old 12-14-2012, 01:14 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by germanmade84 View Post
So what really happens over 6 months in a bottle that improves the taste?
Well, if you have a clean ferment it'll be good in a normal timeframe (weeks).

Those Belgian yeasts can get pretty crazy (high temps) so a lot of times they'll throw off fusels. Time helps those to mellow.

But, lots of high-gravity belgians are simple with lots of alcohol, so time helps mellow the alcohol heat and blend the subtleties of the flavor.

 
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Old 12-14-2012, 02:35 AM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by germanmade84 View Post
So what really happens over 6 months in a bottle that improves the taste?

Belgian yeasts act a lot like wine yeasts. They continue to evolve with age. The flavors blend and improve with age just like a good wine.

Also a. lot of Belgian brews are pretty high alcohol brews and they always do better with age.

 
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