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Old 12-11-2012, 02:19 AM   #1
brewski65
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Jun 2012
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I'm brewing my first lager. Northern Brewer Bavarian Helles, 5 gallon brew, extract kit. I used WYEAST 2352 Munich Lager II. My question is how long should I do a diacetyl rest and at what temperature?

I brewed 8 days ago. OG 1.042. I did a yeast starter. Pitched at 72 degrees (room temp) then put the carboy in a temp controlled chest freezer and cooled to 62 degrees for 8 days now. Active fermentation stopped at about 3 days, visible fermentation slowed by day 4 and stopped soon after.

After D-rest am planning to slowly cool to 40 degrees and lager for one month before bottling.

Any thoughts on d-rest temp and how long to do it for is much appreciated!



Primary: Bavarian Helles, Belgian Dubbel
Secondary: Dry Irish Stout
Bottled: Belgian Tripel, Belgian Dubbel; Belgian Strong Golden Ale, Bavarian Hefe, California Common
On Deck: German Ale, Belgian Tripel

 
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Old 12-11-2012, 02:21 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brewski65 View Post
I'm brewing my first lager. Northern Brewer Bavarian Helles, 5 gallon brew, extract kit. My question is how long should I do a diacetyl rest and at what temperature?

I brewed 8 days ago. OG 1.042. I did a yeast starter. Pitched at 72 degrees (room temp) then put the carboy in a temp controlled chest freezer and cooled to 62 degrees for 8 days now. Active fermentation stopped at about 3 days, visible fermentation slowed by day 4 and stopped soon after. I used WYEAST 2352 Munich Lager II.

After D-rest am planning to slowly cool to 40 degrees and lager for one month before bottling.

Any thoughts on d-rest temp and how long to do it for is much appreciated!



Primary: Bavarian Helles, Belgian Dubbel
Secondary: Dry Irish Stout
Bottled: Belgian Tripel, Belgian Dubbel; Belgian Strong Golden Ale, Bavarian Hefe, California Common
On Deck: German Ale, Belgian Tripel
Do I understand you right? You've been fermenting at 62 degrees with Munich lager II?
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Old 12-11-2012, 11:35 AM   #3
brewski65
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correct, fermenting at 62 degrees with Munich lager II. The extract kit instructions say the optimum temp range is 52-62.

 
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Old 12-11-2012, 12:19 PM   #4
k47k
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I would have pitched that yeast closer to 50 and fermented at 52-53. At 62 you did not make a lager and at 8 days the ferment is long finished, missing the window for drest.

 
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Old 12-11-2012, 12:33 PM   #5
brewski65
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Oh. Is this recoverable or doomed to failure?

 
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Old 12-11-2012, 12:59 PM   #6
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If they sugested the upper range of 62 degrees, and your at within that your flavor profile might be different then what was intended. The yeast used was what determined what was put on the kit interms of ferment temps. I'm a lager brewer, and I've done primary ferments at 59 before for a certain profile I was looking for. Just keep it there for 20 days or so and crash it to 39-35 for Lagering for a month, and you'll have great beer Im sure. Normally I would do a diacetyl rest, after that period, at 65-68 for two days, but since your primary was warmer you might not need to. Sometimes, IMHO, the best beers come from either accidents, or brewing outside the norms.
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Old 12-11-2012, 01:00 PM   #7
k47k
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It will still be beer, it wont be a helles though. if you adjust your expectations and not try to sell the beer as a helles or a lager it may be fine.

 
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Old 12-11-2012, 01:12 PM   #8
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Lager yeast differs from ale yeast, It's bottom fermenting. Also the process of secondary conditioning at really cold temp for longer periods of time is called Lagering(between 1-6months) and it's where the style got it's name. I'm thinking the OP new this when he bought the kit, and has a place to "Lager" at colder temps.

Also just checked the profile of wyeast 2352...states that it's a low sulfur, and low diacetyl producer so you should be good. Also will still be nice and malty
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Old 12-12-2012, 12:21 PM   #9
brewski65
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Jun 2012
Panama City, FL
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thanks all, appreciate the guidance and words of encouragement. I now get why so many brewers say lagering is more labor intensive and requires attention to detail compared to brewing ales!

@ patthebrewer, I was incorrect, the yeast used was Wyeast 2308 Munich Lager. Does this change anything in your recommendations for how best to proceed from here? Still do the drest after I lager for a month?

Primary: Bavarian Helles, Belgian Dubbel
Secondary: Dry Irish Stout
Bottled: Belgian Tripel, Belgian Dubbel; Belgian Strong Golden Ale, Bavarian Hefe, California Common
On Deck: German Ale, Belgian Tripel

 
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Old 12-12-2012, 12:51 PM   #10
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Well, you fermented way too warm for that yeast strain. Here's the info:

This is a unique strain, capable of producing fine lagers. It is very smooth, well-rounded and full-bodied. A thorough diacetyl rest is recommended after fermentation is complete.

Origin:
Flocculation: medium
Attenuation: 70-74%
Temperature Range: 48-56 F (9-13 C)
Alcohol Tolerance: approximately 9% ABV

Go ahead and do a diacetyl rest now (even though you've sort of been doing one all along) and taste for diacetyl. If you have ANY slickness on the tongue or teeth, do NOT lower the temperature for the lagering phase yet. Keep the beer warm until the diacetyl is gone.

If there is absolutely no hint of any slickness or oilyness or butter flavor, you can rack and begin lagering. This won't really be a "lager" but instead what we call "steam beer"- an ale fermented with lager yeast at ale temperatures, like a California common.
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