Making Traditional Sake! The difference between it and Rice wine. - Page 3 - Home Brew Forums
Home Brew Forums > Wine, Mead, Cider, Sake & Soda > Winemaking Forum > Making Traditional Sake! The difference between it and Rice wine.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 01-22-2013, 02:49 AM   #21
Leadgolem
Recipes 
 
Jul 2012
Denver, Colorado
Posts: 3,719
Liked 1037 Times on 781 Posts


Looks great. Be sure to link back here if you start a thread for the jiuqu. I would love to follow that too, my rice wine is a little behind your sake.

Uh, what's the cardamom for?


__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by Remmy
I'd rather work with yeast than work with people.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-22-2013, 03:11 AM   #22
Arpolis
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Recipes 
 
Jan 2012
Tulsa, Oklahoma
Posts: 2,258
Liked 230 Times on 210 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by Leadgolem View Post
Uh, what's the cardamom for?
Flavor and aroma. I first used Cardamom for brewing in a Pumpkin melomel and have loved it since. Just it little does the trick to accent the Sake. Cardamom is a spice originally from india i believe but was a common import to Japan which was used for many Sake inspired sea food dishes. But I have yet to find a commercial Sake with cardamom in it regardless of how well it works.


__________________
A painting says a thousand words. But a painting while on good mead just looks funny!

 
Reply With Quote
Old 01-26-2013, 12:45 AM   #23
Arpolis
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Recipes 
 
Jan 2012
Tulsa, Oklahoma
Posts: 2,258
Liked 230 Times on 210 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by Leadgolem View Post
Looks great. Be sure to link back here if you start a thread for the jiuqu. I would love to follow that too, my rice wine is a little behind your sake.

Uh, what's the cardamom for?
By popular demand I am linking back to this thread the new thread I started on my jiuqu.

Click here to see the thread on home made jiuqu or dried yeast balls!
__________________
A painting says a thousand words. But a painting while on good mead just looks funny!

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2013, 02:05 AM   #24
JBK
Recipes 
 
Jan 2013
Baltimore, Maryland
Posts: 7

First of all, beautiful thread! Second I was wondering if you have ever tried using polished rice, like what is used in many high quality sakes. My one other question is do you have experience freezing the Komi and keeping a "stock" of it like yeast of maybe keeping it in the fridge to use for a next batch. So then you could use 1 batch worth of spores for two or more batches?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2013, 03:23 AM   #25
Arpolis
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Recipes 
 
Jan 2012
Tulsa, Oklahoma
Posts: 2,258
Liked 230 Times on 210 Posts


I sure have thought about using polshed rice. There are plenty out there but you know I never had used any before. The rice I do use is polished but not down to the 40% - 60% slow careful polished rice that super quality Sake has. Calrose or sushi rice makes a fine Sake so unless going to compatition with the stuff I never thought of spending the extra money.

Kome-Koji can freeze just fine. When you buy the stuff at the store it is often frozen. I would personally not have the Kome-Koji be frozen more than 6 months but hear that it can keep up to a year while frozen. While making this batch I kept my active Kome-Koji in the fridge to keep it fresh. I did not add this to the thread before but did notice that with the non-dehydrated or fresh home made Kome-Koji by the last addition of the stuff to the Sake the Kome-Koji was converting itself to sugar in the fridge and was starting to sludge up a bit. A small dip in with the finger to taste and it was like a faint cheese blended with a simple syrup with a little nutty character. Pretty weired but heh not bad.

So make as much of the Kome-Koji as you want and you can do a gallon batch each month if you like and only make the Kome-Koji 2 - 3 times a year.
__________________
A painting says a thousand words. But a painting while on good mead just looks funny!

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2013, 04:32 AM   #26
Arpolis
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Recipes 
 
Jan 2012
Tulsa, Oklahoma
Posts: 2,258
Liked 230 Times on 210 Posts


Here is a couple pics of the final product prepared the way I like it. Heated to about 120*F in my Onyx tea pot with a tsp of my Mahara ja Chai Oolong tea from Teavna steeped for a minimum of 3 minutes after heating.

Click image for larger version

Name:	GEDC0326_800x600.jpg
Views:	934
Size:	30.4 KB
ID:	98962

Click image for larger version

Name:	GEDC0327_800x600.jpg
Views:	924
Size:	32.3 KB
ID:	98963
__________________
A painting says a thousand words. But a painting while on good mead just looks funny!

Johnnyhitch1 Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2013, 01:52 PM   #27
JBK
Recipes 
 
Jan 2013
Baltimore, Maryland
Posts: 7

Thanks for your response, and I have one more question: so I know it's tradition and a recipie, but what would the problem be with using less Koji every time for each addition. Since it is just a mold than wouldn't it be fine to use less and just give it more time?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-06-2013, 05:43 PM   #28
Arpolis
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Recipes 
 
Jan 2012
Tulsa, Oklahoma
Posts: 2,258
Liked 230 Times on 210 Posts


No because the mold does not reproduce like yeast in the must. There is a specific amount of amalyse per amount of kome-koji and if it runs out then you will get a stalled ferment. You might be able to back off the kome-koji a bit but I would not since you don't want to run out of enzymes.
__________________
A painting says a thousand words. But a painting while on good mead just looks funny!

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2013, 12:14 AM   #29
Adrenaline-Junkie
Recipes 
 
Nov 2012
Posts: 151
Liked 12 Times on 10 Posts


Just a suggestion but id ask a moderator to condense all of your relevant posts together in order at the beginning of the thread. Also, a basic run through of the absolute simplest way to make the sake would be great (for those that dont want to make everything from scratch).

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2013, 02:24 AM   #30
BruBrus
Recipes 
 
Sep 2011
Western Mass
Posts: 15


Thanks for the writeup, Arpolis.

The process required of a sake-brewer makes it seem much more like an art than making beer or mead.



 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Making Traditional rice Wine. Cheap, Fun, and Different sonofgrok Winemaking Forum 5519 Today 09:37 PM
SaTho - Thai traditional rice wine arachnyd Winemaking Forum 6 07-22-2014 11:18 PM
Making Sake, need rice suggestion.... RedOctober Winemaking Forum 5 10-05-2011 11:24 PM
For Goodness' Sake! I need rice wine recipe! Cap'n Jewbeard Winemaking Forum 4 04-11-2011 04:30 PM
Sake "rice wine" question - short term storage of Kome Koji rocky6501 Winemaking Forum 7 03-03-2011 11:00 PM


Forum Jump